backtop


Print 66 comment(s) - last by Kishkumen.. on Jul 21 at 7:24 PM

The company developed 12 internal principles to abide by

Still feeling the pinch of the EU's decision to fine $357 million, Microsoft this week released a formal pledge, a list of 12 rules that the company said it will abide by, in order to facility healthy competition in the software market. Microsoft said that it will comply by the self-imposed rules, as well as comply with industry and government regulations.

During a conference, Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith indicated to an audience made up of industry professionals that his company would be focusing on user freedom, choices and that companies can expect this trend to continue well after Vista. "In the broadest sense, I am here to pledge Microsoft's continued commitment to vigorous competition and vital innovation in the software marketplace -- and to explain how this commitment is guiding our development of the next-generation Windows operating system, Windows Vista," said Smith.

Microsoft outlined the following 12 self-imposed commitments:
  • Installation of any software
  • Easy access for software makers
  • Defaults for non-Microsoft programs
  • Exclusive promotion of non-Microsoft programs
  • Business terms (no retaliation against PC makers that support non-Microsoft software)
  • Disclosure of APIs
  • Freedom of choice in Internet services
  • Open Internet access in Windows
  • No exclusivity in middleware contracts
  • Availability of communications protocols
  • Availability of Microsoft patents
  • Support for industry standards
Microsoft also addressed the issue of net neutrality. Smith said that Microsoft would "design and license Windows so that it does not block access to any lawful Web or impose any fee for reaching any non-Microsoft Web site or using a non-Microsoft Web service." However, Smith admitted that the 12 principles were not entirely comprehensive and that there were a lot of answers still left unanswered.

Meanwhile, the EU has not backed off. According to regulations, Microsoft has until the end of this month to comply with EU regulations or face an increase in fines. The EU stated in a report that it would fine Microsoft double the amount -- roughly $634 million -- it received last week if it failed again on July 31st.


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Who cares if they do or don't?
By jonmcguffin on 7/20/2006 3:49:23 PM , Rating: -1
The fact is, people don't have to buy their products or abide by their rules. The European Union just wants to exert it's power onto private organizations. Just because 96% of the world has CHOSEN Microsoft OS's on their own shouldn't give the EU power to dictate to Microsoft what they can and cannot do. It's absurd.

Microsoft should pull out of sales in Europe. The outcry from citizens within the EU would be SO strong and so decisive that the EU would be forced to back down their stance on this issue.




RE: Who cares if they do or don't?
By Strunf on 7/20/2006 4:01:28 PM , Rating: 2
"The European Union just wants to exert it's power onto private organizations."
No private company is above the law ;)

"Microsoft should pull out of sales in Europe."
And leave a 400+ million people market to others?


RE: Who cares if they do or don't?
By BZDTemp on 7/20/2006 4:22:38 PM , Rating: 3
Are u kidding!

Did the EU case damaged your stocks value or something. Have you not gotten that the EU case is about ensureing that Microsoft does not get total control over the software market, the media distribution market and more.

Have you not read the strong arm tactics used by Microsoft or realised how they use their OS to push other software like browsers, media players, database applications...

The EU case is about making sure there is going to be a choice for people in the future. If you need illustrated what happends when Microsoft used their muscles do google for "browser wars" or "netscape vs Microsoft" and then you will hopefully think otherwise.


RE: Who cares if they do or don't?
By TomZ on 7/20/2006 5:00:36 PM , Rating: 2
The Microsoft vs. EU debate has already been fought out on the following recent DT topics earlier this month:

http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=3296
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=3266
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=3221
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=3147

These topics already averaged 150 comments per topic; 600 total. Maybe we can just skip to the conclusion that folks won't ever agree on this topic?


By rrsurfer1 on 7/20/2006 6:57:44 PM , Rating: 2
Yea there has certainly been some debate :)

To be honest those articles and what was argued actually made me change my position. I no longer agree with the EU. The judgment is far too high and MS doesn't even have anything close to a monopoly in the server market. Plus they seem to want to comply with the orders and EU is not giving them time.


By PrinceGaz on 7/21/2006 8:18:07 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, but we like to get on our soapbox and put forward our own point of view for the umpteenth time, even though everyone here has already made up their minds. We know it's futile, but a good rant is fun :)


“And I don't know why [Apple is] acting like it’s superior. I don't even get it. What are they trying to say?” -- Bill Gates on the Mac ads

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki