backtop


Print 33 comment(s) - last by JediJeb.. on Feb 10 at 2:59 PM

The device will be presented at the Black Hat Asia security conference in Singapore next month

A team of Spanish security researchers is out to beef up auto security by showing its ability to hack a car with a device the size of your hand. 
 
According to Forbes, security researchers Javier Vazquez-Vidal and Alberto Garcia Illera plan to show a new device they've built at the Black Hat Asia security conference in Singapore next month -- and they're hoping it will be a wake-up call for the auto industry.
 
The device is called the CAN Hacking Tool (CHT) and it attaches via four wires to the Controller Area Network or CAN bus of a vehicle. It draws power from the car’s electrical system and allows an attacker to send wireless commands remotely from a computer. 
 
The researchers say it's as easy as lifting the hood real quick or simply sliding under the car to attach the device to a vehicle and walk away. 
 
From there, the attacker could switch off headlights, set off alarms, roll windows up and down, and access anti-lock brakes or emergency brakes. The researchers have already tested it on four different vehicles, although they won't reveal which makes and models.


CHT [SOURCE: Forbes]

For right now, the device only works using Bluetooth, which means it can be controlled from just a few feet away. But the research team said that by the time the conference rolls around next year, it will implement a GSM cellular radio, which will allow remote control of the vehicle from a few miles away. 
 
“It can take five minutes or less to hook it up and then walk away,” said Vazquez-Vidal. “We could wait one minute or one year, and then trigger it to do whatever we have programmed it to do.”
 
What makes matters worse is that the items needed to build the device can all easily be bought from store shelves, and costs under $20 total. 
 
Also, it's nearly impossible to trace the attacker, according to the researchers.
 
The team said they built the device to show automakers what attackers are capable of, and to call for greater security in cars, which are becoming increasingly connected and more vulnerable to hacks. 
 
“The goal isn’t to release our hacking tool to the public and say ‘take this and start hacking cars,’” says Vazquez-Vidal. “We want to reach the manufacturers and show them what can be done.”

Source: Forbes



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

I'd like to see that
By alpha754293 on 2/7/2014 12:39:01 PM , Rating: 2
Personally, and honestly, I'd like to see someone try and hack into my 2013 Ford Fusion Titanium Hybrid. They'll get ZERO assistance from me and I might even make it so that my key fobs are in a different city/state/country than where the vehicle physically is located and then I would watch them try and get in and hook up without sounding the alarm or damaging/breaking something in the process.

If they fail, then my car is pretty well sealed. (It doesn't even have an ignition cylinder, which I don't know if it will make it easier or harder for them). But if they succeed, then it's time that I spend more time looking at they did it, and then to make suggestions and/or recommendations as to how we can improve the safety/security systems to make it more robust, and even harder to defeat.

Furthermore, CAN bus traffic is encrypted (or you need a CAN bus translator to make the CAN bus messages meaningful).




"This is from the DailyTech.com. It's a science website." -- Rush Limbaugh

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki