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The device will be presented at the Black Hat Asia security conference in Singapore next month

A team of Spanish security researchers is out to beef up auto security by showing its ability to hack a car with a device the size of your hand. 
 
According to Forbes, security researchers Javier Vazquez-Vidal and Alberto Garcia Illera plan to show a new device they've built at the Black Hat Asia security conference in Singapore next month -- and they're hoping it will be a wake-up call for the auto industry.
 
The device is called the CAN Hacking Tool (CHT) and it attaches via four wires to the Controller Area Network or CAN bus of a vehicle. It draws power from the car’s electrical system and allows an attacker to send wireless commands remotely from a computer. 
 
The researchers say it's as easy as lifting the hood real quick or simply sliding under the car to attach the device to a vehicle and walk away. 
 
From there, the attacker could switch off headlights, set off alarms, roll windows up and down, and access anti-lock brakes or emergency brakes. The researchers have already tested it on four different vehicles, although they won't reveal which makes and models.


CHT [SOURCE: Forbes]

For right now, the device only works using Bluetooth, which means it can be controlled from just a few feet away. But the research team said that by the time the conference rolls around next year, it will implement a GSM cellular radio, which will allow remote control of the vehicle from a few miles away. 
 
“It can take five minutes or less to hook it up and then walk away,” said Vazquez-Vidal. “We could wait one minute or one year, and then trigger it to do whatever we have programmed it to do.”
 
What makes matters worse is that the items needed to build the device can all easily be bought from store shelves, and costs under $20 total. 
 
Also, it's nearly impossible to trace the attacker, according to the researchers.
 
The team said they built the device to show automakers what attackers are capable of, and to call for greater security in cars, which are becoming increasingly connected and more vulnerable to hacks. 
 
“The goal isn’t to release our hacking tool to the public and say ‘take this and start hacking cars,’” says Vazquez-Vidal. “We want to reach the manufacturers and show them what can be done.”

Source: Forbes



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RE: Lol what?
By Motoman on 2/6/2014 1:52:57 PM , Rating: 2
Well, first of all lots of people don't lock their cars...intentionally or because they're absent minded. So easy enough to open an unlocked car door and pop the hood open.

There's also proven ways to hack remote car door openers too...has been for many, many years. There's no reason to assume that a group of people so sophisticated as to be able/willing to pull this off wouldn't be able to firstly find their way into the car.

If you did want to get under a car, all it takes is a bottle jack or two and an extra 60 seconds. BFD. Although I agree that for the vast majority of cars that's not going to help you get to any major wiring harnesses.

Lastly, on the issue of "bare wires" - if you can quickly find the correct wiring harness and slice open the casing, you just take the bare wires and some of those Scotch wire splicer thingies and *bam* - done. Probably the easiest way to do it.


RE: Lol what?
By Spuke on 2/6/2014 5:34:57 PM , Rating: 1
BAM! Good luck with all that on my car. Bottle jack? LOL! Wiring harness from the bottom? LOL! What car has the wiring harness running on the BOTTOM? Look, if you have THAT kind of knowledge of a particular car (where you know what part of the harness does what), you don't need this hack AT ALL. Just steal the car!


RE: Lol what?
By Motoman on 2/7/2014 8:46:05 PM , Rating: 2
Did you even read my post? I just...nevermind. I sense a disturbance in the force telling me there's not any point in telling you what you did wrong.


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