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IDC shows a smaller 5.6% decline in the global PC market

The latest metrics for the Pc industry are in form research firm Gartner. Gartner shows that the global PC industry declined 6.9% in Q4 2013. That marks the worst decline in the history of the PC market. The upside for the PC industry is that industry analysts think we have reached the bottom.
 
Hitting bottom means that sales and shipments of PCs are expected to level out and hover around the current level. The top computer maker in the industry for Q4 2013 was Lenovo with 18.1% of the market. Lenovo was followed by HP with 16.4% of the PC market. Rounding out the top five were Dell, Acer, and Asus.

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon
 
Gartner's top chart looks a bit different when you consider the U.S. market alone. HP was the top company in the U.S. with 26.5% of the market followed by Dell with 22.8%. Apple was number three in the US at 13.7% of the market with Lenovo not showing up until fourth place with 9.7% of the U.S. market. Toshiba has the fifth place spot in the U.S. with 7.2% of the market.
 
The numbers for research firm IDC are similar, but show a less significant decline in the overall PC market – 5.6% -- for Q4 2013.
 
IDC lists Lenovo as the top firm in the global PC industry with 18.6% of the market followed by HP with 16.8%. The remainder of the top five include Dell, Acer, and Asus. In the U.S., the top firm is HP with 24.6% of the market followed by Dell with 21.7%, Lenovo with 9.8%, Apple with 9.3%, and Toshiba with 8.2%.

Sources: Gartner, IDC



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By Tony Swash on 1/10/2014 6:15:09 PM , Rating: 0
As usual Ben Thompson at Stratechery has some interesting stuff to say (not formatted as a proper link because of DT's brain dead spam filter).

stratechery.com/2014/windows-8-cost-complexity

A couple of quotes from the article.

quote:
the only way that Microsoft makes money (in the consumer market) is through users buying new computers and the associated licenses (this is why Bing’s failure was so critical; by failing to build profitable online services, Microsoft has no way of monetizing consumers over time). This means that people using Windows are in effect worthless to Microsoft; they need people to buy Windows, which usually means buying a new computer.


quote:
Microsoft’s trump card remains Office,5 a product with power that remains under-appreciated by most in Silicon Valley (e.g. my dad’s job). However, the complexities of Windows are rapidly dragging Office down; one of the most critical decisions facing the next CEO6 is whether or not to unburden Office from the Windows strategy tax and leave Windows to figure it out on its own.




“And I don't know why [Apple is] acting like it’s superior. I don't even get it. What are they trying to say?” -- Bill Gates on the Mac ads











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