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It is believed that Snowden had access to about 1.7 million files and only 1 percent have been published

The U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) is reportedly considering granting Edward Snowden an amnesty deal. However, the NSA's director isn't onboard, saying too much damage has already been done.

According to BBC News, Richard Ledgett -- head of the NSA taskforce looking into the Snowden leaks -- said he would be open to granting Snowden amnesty as long as the now-famous NSA leaker stops revealing the agency's secrets. 

"I would need assurances that the remainder of the data could be secured, and my bar for those assurances would be very high, would be more than just an assertion on his part," said Ledgett. 

This would be great news for Snowden, who began leaking details on top secret NSA surveillance programs to the media earlier this year. Snowden is a former NSA contractor who gained access to the surveillance program documents and downloaded them illegally. 

Despite Ledgett's views, NSA Director Gen Keith Alexander made it clear that he does not agree with the possibility of an amnesty deal. 

"This is analogous to a hostage taker taking 50 people hostage, shooting 10, and then say, 'if you give me full amnesty, I'll let the other 40 go'. What do you do?" said Alexander. 

For it's part, the White House has maintained that there should be no amnesty provided for Snowden. "Mr. Snowden is accused of leaking classified information and faces felony charges here in the United States," said Security Council spokesman Caitlin Hayden to USA Today. "He should be returned to the U.S. as soon as possible, where he will be accorded full due process and protections."


It is believed that Snowden had access to about 1.7 million files, and only about 1 percent of those files have been published by the media. Recognizing that a lot more could roll down the pipeline, Ledgett is likely trying to prevent further catastrophe for the NSA. 

So far, the U.S. has charged Snowden with theft of government property and unauthorized communication of national defense information as well as willful communication of classified communications intelligence. Each of these charges comes with a maximum 10-year prison sentence.

Last week, it was reported that a a presidential review panel is working on draft recommendations that aim to change how the NSA collects and accesses Americans' data such as phone records. They were to be turned in to the White House yesterday. 

Source: BBC News



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RE: Bad idea
By ritualm on 12/16/2013 9:46:15 PM , Rating: 2
Both Ammohunt and FXi would rather chicken out and take the blue pill, than to face off against their mortal enemies - themselves, ironically - to cherish and preserve what little patriotism and freedoms they have remaining right now.

When you start complaining that the government has too much power over your personal life and are not happy with the way things are progressing, it is already too late.

As far as I'm concerned, both of you deserve to be charged with "Aiding the Enemy" under the Espionage Act.


RE: Bad idea
By Ammohunt on 12/16/2013 10:01:05 PM , Rating: 3
So what you are saying is that the Government which is comprised of you, me and FXi and about 350 Million other Americans which created the NSA and everything bad they have done are the enemy? Sounds like an easy out for you to create a simple us vs them scenario kill em all! to bad for you and bully for the patriots its just not that simple.


RE: Bad idea
By ritualm on 12/17/2013 2:07:22 PM , Rating: 2
Cute of you to think that way, while doing the exact same thing you just accused me with. You gain nothing by relinquishing your freedom and privacy because someone higher up promised "greater safety and protection".

Snowden is not a traitor or an enemy of the state. The laws he broke - the very laws that granted sweeping powers to illegally extract information without accountability - are tyrannical and oppressive by design. The oath to protect the US Constitution from all external and internal threats is greater than all confidentiality agreements combined.

Your problem is your foolish belief that people who broke illegal secrecy laws to uncover the truth are "enemies of the free world", while simultaneously believing every word coming out of the joint US government and mainstream media Kool-Aid(TM) machine as gospel. Snowden is not the problem here - you are.

Good job trying to fool me with your NSF cheque, but no cigar.


RE: Bad idea
By Ammohunt on 12/17/2013 6:44:49 PM , Rating: 1
Like i have stated many times before as long as our society is civilized and Americans are ok with what the NSA is doing for the obvious reasons then government is working..right or wrong. If they aren't ok with it(which seems to be the case) then change will be exacted through level headed people via the governing process and not via a bunch of malcontents such as yourself bitching about how things should be or worse yet people that think they are so special and smart that they can single highhandedly make judgments that directly affects the lives of millions of people globally.

Give it up already their isn't an us vs them only we the government that we have inflicted ourselves with! don't ask what other secrets are hiding that the Snowdens of the world can release but ask what your elected representative knows or doesn't know; you elected them make them work.


RE: Bad idea
By flatrock on 12/18/2013 10:05:50 AM , Rating: 2
He didn't just break secrecy laws to uncover "the truth". I agree that the government's program of gathering up such massive amounts of metadata makes a mockery of the constitutionality of Smith v Maryland. But Snowden didn't stop at narrow leaks to point out likely unconstitutional acts. He also only leaked information about the intelligence gathering efforts of the US and their allies. Counterintelligence is a primary responsibility of the NSA. Do you think he only had access to what the US and their allies were doing? He leaked a huge amount of documents. So why do they all disclose actions taken by the US and their allies?

I won't claim to understand his motives. I am happy that some good may come from his actions, and I think some of his actions can be justified. But they aren't all justified, and he needs to face the consequences of his actions.


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