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Tesla CEO Elon Musk  (Source: Associated Press)
Musk added that a lot of the media has delivered "inaccurate" and "unreasonable" reports in regards to the Model S fires

Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk has responded to the recent Model S fires occurring around North America and he made one thing clear: there will not be a Model S recall
 
“There’s definitely not going to be a recall," said Musk according to a new report from Bloomberg. "We’re about five times less likely to have a fire than an average gasoline car. There are 200,000 gasoline car fires per year in the United States, 200,000. There are on average 250 to 300 automotive fire deaths in the U.S. How many times have you read about that?”
 
Musk added that a lot of the media has delivered "inaccurate" and "unreasonable" reports in regards to the Model S fires. 
 
Musk's comments were prompted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) decision to review the most recent Model S fire.


The first fire took place in early October of this year. A Model S driver in Kent, Washington was traveling southbound on State Route 167 when he hit a piece of metal debris on the freeway and subsequently caught fire.
 
Tesla spokeswoman Liz Jarvis-Shean said that a large metallic object hitting one of the battery pack modules caused the fire. The NHTSA did not investigate the fire at the time because of the partial government shutdown, which suspended such activity. 
 
The second Model S fire occurred shortly after near Merida, Mexico, but that's out of NHTSA's jurisdiction. 
 
The third incident occurred just days ago when a Model S driver in Murfreesboro, Tennessee hit a tow hitch on Interstate 24, which damaged the car’s undercarriage and caused a fire. The driver was able to exit the vehicle safely.
 
Special focus is being placed on the fact that the Model S' battery is located low in the body (to make for a lower center of gravity), making the battery an easy target when striking debris or hitting pavement.
 
Tesla said all three fires were caused by crashes; not spontaneous events.

Source: Bloomberg



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RE: Statistics
By bsd228 on 11/14/2013 2:24:10 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Even on a modest milage count of 12k per year, you are talking about a vehicle with 360,000 miles on it. 240,000 miles if we are on the low end at 20 years.


12k is hardly a modest mileage count. I just retired a 17 yo car with 152k on it, and its last 5 years as my only car it only did 30. If you don't use it to get to work, or your work commute is minor, the miles don't pile on. That said, at 17 it was showing its age. The paint and body looked decent, but the shocks were gone, the wiring getting a little flaky, the door seals weren't at all like they were. I suspect that 15-20 is where most go offline, or become that spare car in the driveway, doing light miles and spending a lot of time getting fixed.


RE: Statistics
By Keeir on 11/14/2013 10:22:00 PM , Rating: 2
Yes it is.

Data shows that both the Average and Median US licensed driver logs more than 13,500 miles a year.

Data also shows that the average age of a registered car is ~11 years.

The typical car in the US "retires" between 15-25 years old with 200k to 250k miles on it.


RE: Statistics
By tastyratz on 11/15/2013 11:56:26 AM , Rating: 2
I don't doubt your data but am curious of your source? Link?


RE: Statistics
By Keeir on 11/15/2013 8:28:16 PM , Rating: 2
"Nowadays you can buy a CPU cheaper than the CPU fan." -- Unnamed AMD executive

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