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  (Source: blogspot.com)
The process of actually removing trans fat from all food could take awhile, even years

Trans fat may get the boot out of every food in the U.S. if the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has its way.

The FDA is starting a 60-day public comment period today regarding the elimination of trans fat from its list of ingredients deemed safe for consumption.

"[The FDA] is responding to the fact that the science really demonstrates that trans fat provides no known health benefit and that there really is no safe level of consumption of trans fat," said FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg. "Consumption should be as low as possible while consuming a nutritionally adequate diet."

The process of actually removing trans fat from all food could take awhile, even years. Food manufacturers will need time to find safe substitutes and change up their ingredients. 

Food manufacturers typically use trans fat to increase product shelf life and maintain flavors, and it's commonly used in items like baked goods, canned frosting, stick margarine and coffee creamers.

What exactly is trans fat? It's partially hydrogenated oil that is made by bubbling hydrogen through hot vegetable oil. This transforms the liquid oil into a fat that is solid at room temperature.

Many studies show that trans fat increasing LDL cholesterol (the bad kind) and decreases HDL (the good kind). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added that 5,000 Americans die of heart disease annually and another 15,000 will get heart disease because of artificial trans fat in food. 

"This is the first step in removing artificial trans fats from processed foods," said Hamburg.

Source: USA Today



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So...
By eBob on 11/7/2013 2:27:56 PM , Rating: 0
this is the first step in removing trans fats from the foods we eat. Has anyone bothered to ask what will replace the trans fats? This sounds like a bunch of unelected and unaccountable bureaucrats coming up with regulations that have the force of law without giving any thought to the obvious unintended consequences. Mark my words, whatever replaces trans fats will be much worse.




RE: So...
By GreenEnvt on 11/7/2013 2:38:20 PM , Rating: 5
We already have these things, there are lots of naturally occurring fats, both saturated and unsaturated, they do the same type of job in food. Things like Olive and coconut oil, even bacon grease. Manufacturers can just switch back to those.

The reason companies switched to these Trans fats is because it makes their products have much longer shelf lives.

So maybe after this switch your box of Oreos won't last a year on the shelf, only a couple months.

This is a simplified response, but it's not like these transfats are letting us make products we couldn't before.


RE: So...
By drycrust3 on 11/7/2013 3:35:59 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
So maybe after this switch your box of Oreos won't last a year on the shelf, only a couple months.

So one consequence of the shorter shelf life will be shorter "Best Before" dates on the packaging, which, as you suggest, really just discourages compulsive hoarding of perishable and semi-perishable foods ... which is what retailers, at least secretly anyway, want. For example, you bought something, put it in the cupboard meaning to eat it later that week, forgot it was in the cupboard, and then one night foraging "Yum! When did I buy this?" - see the date "Oh yuk! One day past the expiry date! Can't eat that! Better biff it. I'll eat something else" meaning you've just got rid of two packets of food, which you'll now replace, instead of one, i.e. the retailer will now sell you two packets of food instead of one.


RE: So...
By inighthawki on 11/7/2013 3:56:56 PM , Rating: 3
So basically it's encouraging people not to hoard junk food that will sit in their cabinet forever. How awful.


RE: So...
By Jeffk464 on 11/7/2013 6:14:37 PM , Rating: 2
Now if we could get people just stop eating junk food period.


RE: So...
By Omega215D on 11/8/2013 12:17:29 PM , Rating: 3
Demolition Man much?

I like to enjoy life and in moderation when it comes to the "bad" stuff. Maybe if they would bring back recess and playground sports then kids won't be so fat (i didn't know tag was outlawed so to speak).


RE: So...
By Jeffk464 on 11/8/2013 3:30:23 PM , Rating: 2
I don't really enjoy junk food, give me real food instead any day of the week.


RE: So...
By conq on 11/11/2013 8:32:39 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I like to enjoy life and in moderation when it comes to the "bad" stuff. Maybe if they would bring back recess and playground sports then kids won't be so fat (i didn't know tag was outlawed so to speak).


I second that except I disagree on trans fats. There is no saving grace for the consumer (other than maybe cheaper products, MAYBE). It's very bad for you. You can still enjoy all of the bad foods just as much without trans fats than with trans fats, albeit pay a fraction more. They could put arsenic to increase shelf life and lower costs too, I wouldn't call that enjoying the bad stuff in moderation!


RE: So...
By quasibaka on 11/7/2013 2:47:05 PM , Rating: 1
Trans-Fat are a type of chemical that is formed when poly-unsaturated fatty acids are partially hydrogenated using chemical methods. The resultant unsaturated fatty acids are formed in both 'cis' and 'trans' forms . The TFA are a minor byproduct of this reaction. To not make TFA , more expensive catalyst will have to be used for the reaction.

TFA are not found in nature and hence Humans cannot break them down.So even minor quantities of TFA will accumulate in your body over time .They don't affect LDL levels much , however they cause stiff cell memberanes which lead to Atherosclerosis , Heart attacks , DVT and stroke.

So unless you know something more please shut up FFS eBob.


RE: So...
By Reclaimer77 on 11/7/2013 3:04:05 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
They don't affect LDL levels much , however they cause stiff cell memberanes which lead to Atherosclerosis , Heart attacks , DVT and stroke.


I've seen the establishment wrong on so many food items from coffee to the egg to protein, that I'm sure in a few years we'll also see reports showing TFA's are not the smoking gun we thought they were either.

Anyway I've all but given up on here advocating for a limited Constitutional Government. But because I'm well - me - I'll state this is yet another completely unfounded over-reach of federal power.

To quote my Liberal friends, it's my body, it should be up to me what I choose to put it in. Do we really need an FDA ban here?


RE: So...
By CaedenV on 11/7/2013 3:11:20 PM , Rating: 3
TFAs have been a known problem for a while now, and many companies have already been moving away from them for some time. It may not be as big of a health risk as they are stating it to be, but TFAs pose a very real potential threat while no longer being necessary, so it should be phased out either way.


RE: So...
By Reclaimer77 on 11/7/2013 3:24:18 PM , Rating: 5
meh

"We have lost perspective on the important threats to our health: smoking, obesity, excessive alcohol use and more. And if we ban trans fats, we move one step closer to endorsing the principle that government should determine what we eat and how we should live — even when the data and expected benefits are skimpy."

http://acsh.org/2006/11/trans-fat-threat-exaggerat...


RE: So...
By slunkius on 11/11/2013 2:26:33 AM , Rating: 2
how ironic that your quoted article mentions smoking. Not that long ago tobacco companies were swearing that smoking is not harmful, and i bet there was reclaimer-like figure shouting "only communists want to regulate business"


RE: So...
By joshuasims1981 on 11/7/2013 3:21:09 PM , Rating: 2
It has nothing to do with what you eat. It has to do with what companies are allowed to put in their product. For example: Dutch Oil is very useful in the production of PVC and as a solvent, but it is banned in the US because it's a toxic & carcinogenic material that remains as a residue for a long time.
If it wasn't banned, it'd still be in use and poisoning the public at large because it's cheap and effective. Similarly, trans-fats are cheap and easy to produce and have several beneficial properties from an engineering standpoint. Unfortunately, they're detrimental to a consumer's health.


RE: So...
By Reclaimer77 on 11/7/2013 3:29:14 PM , Rating: 5
Okay so what's next? Sugar, salt, carbs? Maybe we'll try Prohibition again too while we're at it!

quote:
Unfortunately, they're detrimental to a consumer's health.


That is VERY dangerous thinking. Don't give them that much power. A great many things can be construed as being "harmful" to our health. But that's the cost of Freedom. We, as a society, should be free to make choices that aren't always in our best interests!

I'm not arguing that Trans fats don't pose any health risks, but is it at the level that we need the Government to step in? Certainly not.


RE: So...
By JediJeb on 11/7/2013 3:59:58 PM , Rating: 2
My Biochemistry teacher in college got off on a similar topic back then. It was when saturated fat was the big buzz word and everyone was pushing the use of polyunsaturated fats as being healthy because they didn't cause heart disease. As he said, do you want to die from heart disease or cancer, because by their very nature unsaturated fats are potentially carcinogenic, yet nobody was worried about that, only that they could prevent heart disease by switching to them.

Too often one or two very vocal people end up setting policy even when their assumptions are wrong.


RE: So...
By augiem on 11/7/2013 5:18:46 PM , Rating: 3
I am all for smaller government, but some level of regulation is required. Just look at any of the rising 3rd world countries in the world and you'll see if people can gain some kind of profit by doing something terrible to others and get away with it, they will, no matter how evil it is. From dangerous chemicals in baby food to fake prescription drugs that kill people to shoddy products that cause fires to rip-off liquors that contain acetone and isopropyl alcohol, on and on and on.

We already have tons of regulations, some are overzealous, some are not. You wouldn't advocate repealing all of those would you? Let's get rid of all food safety laws. Restaurants should be able to (legally) leave buckets of chicken unrefrigerated under the sink with a family of rats living in it. Canned food processes shouldn't have to be regulated so they kill all the bacteria in it so people don't get botulism. But it's their choice to put it in their bodies! The thing is, the average consumer must be able to make the assumption that something they're buying to eat is reasonably safe, otherwise they wouldn't buy it at all and there goes society. Regulation is an evil but necessary part of society because not everyone is nice.

Knee jerk reactions go both ways.


RE: So...
By Reclaimer77 on 11/7/2013 7:21:38 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I am all for smaller government, but (goes on to justify big-Government actions)


Not picking on you, but I've seen this WAY too many times. Either you're for a small limited Government, or you're not.

I'm not asking for the Wild Wild West here or Anarchy. But Trans Fatty Acids falling under Federal Government jurisdiction? That's ridiculous!

But we're talking about the same Government that literally banned a light bulb...so who am I kidding?

Sometimes I honestly wish I could be like you guys and just not give a goddamn. Life would be easier.


RE: So...
By augiem on 11/7/2013 10:06:53 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Not picking on you, but I've seen this WAY too many times. Either you're for a small limited Government, or you're not.


I said smaller, not zero. And I gave great justification for you. You are wayyyy too idealistic. It's not based in reality. Someday you'll understand I hope.


RE: So...
By Reclaimer77 on 11/8/2013 10:39:01 AM , Rating: 2
This is not some epidemic or toxic chemical being pumped into our water. Or a drug that causes birth defects.

There isn't even direct causation here, just correlation.

I totally support action when warranted. I just don't see that it is here.

Banning tobacco products and alcohol would save way more lives and improve the health of millions. But those are taxable cash cows for the Gov.


RE: So...
By sorry dog on 11/10/2013 8:49:57 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe we should reform corporate shield laws such that if the corporation is criminally negligent, then the managers and their bosses shall serve the jail time for the corporate "person."

I bet Koch brothers and ADM executives will start acting waaayy differently if that were to happen....and those 8 figure salaries might be justified.

...of course we'll be getting our food from replicators before that happens....


RE: So...
By Jeffk464 on 11/7/2013 6:22:48 PM , Rating: 2
The government isn't banning a final food product its just regulating what can be used to make the food product. Don't worry you will still be able to buy your favorite junk food.


RE: So...
By Reclaimer77 on 11/7/2013 7:15:10 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The government isn't banning a final food product its just regulating what can be used to make the food product.


May I offer an alternative?

1. Check if Trans Fatty Acids are in food product.
2. Don't buy said product.

Amazing!!!!


RE: So...
By Samus on 11/7/2013 10:22:27 PM , Rating: 2
Food products don't have to list trans fat if it contains less than 0.5g/serving. That's still a huge amount of trans fat when you consider there are 8 servings in a carton of Goldfish crackers and its pretty easy to eat 1/3 of a carton in a single bowl of soup. That'd be nearly 2 grams of trans fat, more than you used to get in a large French fry from McDonald's before they started reducing the amount they used.

New York city banned trans fat years ago and the substitutes are healthier oils such as coconut, peanut or even grape seed for uncooked goods.

This is an example of good government regulation in the same way blocking the ATT/ T-Mobile merger was.

The government isn't completely corrupt and evil, just inefficient and expensive.


RE: So...
By superstition on 11/8/2013 1:59:54 AM , Rating: 2
That was done on purpose so companies could hide the trans fat they still wanted to use.

A fun one is the way packaging labels will read: "canola oil and/or partially hydrogenated soybean oil"

The product should list how much total trans fat is in the package, along with how much sodium. And, companies need to start using iodized salt again.


RE: So...
By ipay on 11/8/2013 8:34:40 AM , Rating: 2
Am who ensures that you're able to tell what's in a food product?

You're ridiculous.


RE: So...
By mike66 on 11/7/2013 7:46:11 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
is it at the level that we need the Government to step in? Certainly not.

Sometimes you really just argue for the sake of it.
The government has stepped in and said enough, the levels are to high. You have complained before that industry has to much influence on your government and as soon your government regulates you say it impinges on your personnel rights! Go have a doughnut.


RE: So...
By augiem on 11/7/2013 10:05:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Sometimes you really just argue for the sake of it.


Sometimes???


RE: So...
By gookpwr on 11/7/2013 5:19:10 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly!! Now they no longer allowed the use of High fructose corn syrup and Aspartame, I think we would see a dramatic improvement in health for the general public that ignorantly consumes anything the FDA deems legally allowed to be used in making food.


RE: So...
By Jeffk464 on 11/7/2013 6:19:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
To quote my Liberal friends, it's my body, it should be up to me what I choose to put it in. Do we really need an FDA ban here?


The problem is that without government oversight we would have no idea what they are putting in our food. How many people are dead because we had no idea what the impact of tras fats was.


RE: So...
By Reclaimer77 on 11/7/2013 7:09:34 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
How many people are dead because we had no idea what the impact of tras fats was.


This is the kind of hyperbole being spread around over this. People dying from Trans Fats alone? Not lack of exercise, not neglect, not being overweight. But Trans fats...

So after you ban Trans Fats and we still have the same problems, what then?


RE: So...
By mike66 on 11/7/2013 7:50:45 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
So after you ban Trans Fats and we still have the same problems, what then?

Then they will figure out that it is not the only culprit and ban refined cane sugar after that.


RE: So...
By Jeffk464 on 11/8/2013 10:48:00 AM , Rating: 2
Personally I think the problem is people don't work for a living anymore, they buy all factory food, and they sit on their ass eating potato chips between meals. Everything we've done to play into human laziness(convenience) has contributed to the physiological disaster that is the modern suburban lifestyle. Show me all the pictures of fat Vietnamese farmers that work the land by hand, and live off the food of the that land. :)


RE: So...
By Jeffk464 on 11/8/2013 11:05:46 AM , Rating: 2
Supposedly the life span of New Yorkers is about 10 years longer than people living in suburbia. The best theory for the discrepancy was that living in New York basically forces people to walk on average about 5 miles a day. How many times have you gone to the grocery store and seen people driving up and down the rows in the parking lot to try and get the closest parking spot?


RE: So...
By JediJeb on 11/8/2013 1:08:43 PM , Rating: 2
Better yet, watch people drive up and down looking for the closest parking spot to the front door the the gym :)


RE: So...
By mmc4587 on 11/7/2013 8:24:27 PM , Rating: 2
Biological processes create and modify fats in particular ways.
Chemical processes (even cooking) are not nearly so discriminate, and produce ISOMERS that are not found in nature (like trans-fats) and damaged fats. These fats are functionally different than their non-damaged & natural counterparts, and can cause all sorts of problems.

Much of the advertisements regarding heart disease show linkages that are NOT CAUSAL. Just like we shouldn't say that hospitals cause mortality simply because they are associated with the sick and dying... Unfortunately, saturated fats and cholesterol have gotten a bad rap just because they are associated with heart disease and not because they cause heart disease.
...For instance High/Low-Density-Lipo-Proteins (aka HDL/LDL--which is a protein not a cholesterol) transfers cholesterol to and from the liver. If we consume high levels of damaged cholesterol... then we will have increased levels of damaged cholesterol absorbed into our bodies NECESSITATING the increase of HDL/LDL so that the damaged cholesterols and debris can be processed by the liver and replaced with healthy un-damaged cholesterol. (Looking at the situation this way, we can understand that HDL/LDL are really akin to a cellular ambulance service) So, the LAST thing you want to do in such a circumstances is to take cholesterol lowering drugs!

Our Health Care System (so called) is full of such issues. If you want to get your feet wet, and gain establish a healthy foundation, I suggest starting with these two related reads:

http://drbenkim.com/articles-cholesterol.html
http://drbenkim.com/articles-fat.html


RE: So...
By mike66 on 11/7/2013 8:21:48 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Mark my words, whatever replaces trans fats will be much worse.

Maybe something natural like butter or lard? I used to watch my grand parents eat both in huge quantities and neither had heart problems, both lived to above their 90's. Those are not hydroxyl effected fats, trans-fats and margarine are.


RE: So...
By jeffbui on 11/8/2013 8:32:33 AM , Rating: 2
Interesterified fats are commonly used to replace trans fats and they seem to be really bad for the body as well


RE: So...
By piroroadkill on 11/8/13, Rating: 0
"Game reviewers fought each other to write the most glowing coverage possible for the powerhouse Sony, MS systems. Reviewers flipped coins to see who would review the Nintendo Wii. The losers got stuck with the job." -- Andy Marken














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