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It's expected to have lower up-front costs for fuel efficiency, but only has a lifespan of four years on the battery

A Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based global automotive supplier has developed a smaller micro-hybrid battery pack meant to make gains in fuel efficiency more affordable. 

According to The Detroit NewsJohnson Controls has reduced the size of the micro-hybrid battery pack from that of a car trunk to the size of a shoe box. The system consists of a 48-volt lithium-ion battery pack and an advanced low-voltage lead-acid battery. It supports higher power loads and regenerative braking.

Micro-hybrid technology can be implemented in large gas or diesel-powered vehicles like SUVs and trucks. The idea is to make these vehicles more efficient at a lower price. 

For comparison purposes, a micro-hybrid system with an advanced, lead-acid 12-volt battery coupled with the lithium-ion battery and start-stop technology will improve fuel efficiency about 15 percent (compared to a standard internal combustion engine). Start-stop systems alone, where the engine stops running when a vehicle is stopped and restarts when the accelerator is used, has about an 8 percent improvement. 


While neither of these beat the 20 percent improvement from a full hybrid, the micro-hybrid system is pretty close. And with Johnson Controls' smaller system, the price will be even lower, allowing more drivers to pay hundreds of dollars instead of thousands for full hybrids. 

But there is one feature of a micro-hybrid system that may be seen as a downfall: the smaller lithium-ion battery has the lifespan of about four years while larger lithium-ion batteries in full hybrids have a 10-year lifespan. That means the battery will have to be changed every four years, which is reportedly an easy process, but could be costly. 

But micro-hybrid systems are expected to become more popular in the U.S. auto market by the end of the decade. Global sales projections for micro-hybrids are estimated to be about 40 million annual sales by 2020. Currently, there are about 5 million global annual sales (the systems are most popular in Europe and China). 

The systems are likely gaining popularity in the U.S. due to the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) requirements, which state that automaker’s fleetwide average fuel economy to equal 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025.

Source: The Detroit News



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RE: Do lead-acid batters get hybrid home runs
By futrtrubl on 11/5/2013 12:11:40 PM , Rating: 5
I use lead-acid batter for my pancakes. People don't seem to like them though.


RE: Do lead-acid batters get hybrid home runs
By Motoman on 11/5/2013 12:13:50 PM , Rating: 3
Does wonders for your electrolyte levels though.


By Spuke on 11/5/2013 12:55:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I use lead-acid batter for my pancakes. People don't seem to like them though.

quote:
Does wonders for your electrolyte levels though.

quote:
Of course they do, they're obviously juiced up.


Aaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!! MAKE IT STOP!!!!


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