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New 8 inch tablet prototype also leaks

Hot on the heels of the announcement of the 10.1-inch Lumia 2520 Windows RT 8.1 tablet and the 6-inch Lumia 1520/1320 phablets -- plus some slick accessories like the "Treasure Tag" -- at Nokia World, more fresh devices are leaking from the Nokia Devices brand.

I. Lumia 929 Set to Rock Verizon

First up is the Lumia 929.  The Lumia 929 will be an iterative bump to Nokia's line to keep up with Jones, i.e. the Android OEMs who are flocking to the quad-core Snapdragon 800, which is becoming available at last from Qualcomm Inc. (QCOM).

Under Microsoft's guidance, Nokia is moving to a more aggressive device rollout schedule, and the Lumia 929 is proof of that.

The device is set to go on sale at Verizon Communications Inc.'s (VZ) Verizon Wireless brand -- the largest LTE carrier in the U.S. -- and is also rumored to be an exclusive (for the holidays at least).  The phone runs Windows Phone 8 Update 3, the last major update to arrive before Windows Phone 8.1.

Lumia 929
  • Price :
    • ??
  • Form Factor
  • Size:   ??
  • Weight: ??
  • Colors
    • glossy white
    • matte black
  • Screen
    • 5.0 inches
    • 1080p (1920x1080 pixel)
    • 440 ppi
    • AMOLED
    • Gorilla Glass 3
  • SoC
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon 800
      • 2.26 GHz quad-core ARM Krait 400 CPU
      • Adreno 330 GPU
  • RAM:
    • 2 GB DRAM
  • Battery
    • ??
  • Storage
    • Internal
    • 32 GB
    • No microSD
  • Camera(s)
    • Rear
      • 20MP (with PureView optical stabilization)
    • Front
      • 1.3MP
  • Connectivity
    • LTE
    • Dual-band Wi-Fi (2.4G/5G) 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac
    • Bluetooth v4.0
    • NFC
  • Other
    • Qi charging

Another leak -- from top Nokia leaker @ev-leaks on Twitter -- revealed an upcoming 8-inch Windows RT tablet from the Nokia Devices brand. 
The tablet is rumored to be in the testing phase under the codename "Illusionist" and will be only Nokia's second large-size tablet computer following the 10-inch Lumia 2520.  If the Lumia 2520 is any clue, the 8-inch Lumia device may pack higher end hardware and a slightly higher sticker price than possible 7-to-8-inch Microsoft Surface branded devices.

The Verge has offered direct confirmation from Nokia Devices that the 8-incher is indeed real.  They add that it will pack a Qualcomm chip (likely the Snapdragon 800).  The small tablet is reportedly due out later next year along with budget Lumia 1310.

Sources: WPCentral, EV Leaks, The Verge



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Doesn't matter.
By Tequilasunriser on 11/4/2013 8:55:28 PM , Rating: -1
Doesn't have Android.




RE: Doesn't matter.
By kyuuketsuki on 11/4/2013 9:11:59 PM , Rating: 3
Thanks for the valuable input. If you don't care about anything that doesn't run Android, then uh, don't read articles about Nokia phones?


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Tequilasunriser on 11/4/13, Rating: -1
RE: Doesn't matter.
By greenchinesepuck on 11/5/13, Rating: -1
RE: Doesn't matter.
By DoubtlessOne on 11/5/2013 3:54:51 AM , Rating: 2
I think he got too much tequila sunrise to appreciate other OSes =P


RE: Doesn't matter.
By elleehswon on 11/5/13, Rating: -1
RE: Doesn't matter.
By crispbp04 on 11/5/2013 10:21:51 AM , Rating: 3
Calling it Windows Mobile alone proves how dumb and out of touch with reality you are. Talking about the app market proves it even further.

you should up your IQ before you post again.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By a5cent on 11/5/2013 10:24:13 AM , Rating: 4
I suspect that people like you, who still call this OS "Windows Mobile" THREE YEARS after MS ditched it and replaced it with Windows Phone, likely have no idea what they are commenting on. If you can't even get the name right, the rest of your opinion is likely also worthless.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By SpartanJet on 11/4/2013 9:37:21 PM , Rating: 3
And that is why I'm interested in this phone!


RE: Doesn't matter.
By retrospooty on 11/4/2013 9:49:01 PM , Rating: 2
I like the hardware, Nokia phones look pretty nice. The only thing I don't like at all is that they all have huge bezels.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/4/2013 10:05:29 PM , Rating: 1
I'm becoming increasingly annoyed with Nokia's naming conventions. Frankly it's lazy.

I know what an iPhone is, I know what a "Galaxy" phone is, I know what a "Note" line phone is.

Nokia appears to have about 50 phones and tablets out, almost as if their goal is to flood the market with phones that have little to no distinction from model to model. The model numbers have no recognizable purpose or designation that indicates to the consumer what it is. I see that, generally, the higher number means "better" phone, and the "20" means it's a new phone (why 20 exactly?), but it's so goddamn vague and confusing!

I'm not complaining about variety, variety is great! But I shouldn't have to Google 30+ different models to get some idea of what the phone is all about.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reflex on 11/5/2013 12:01:20 AM , Rating: 3
This really isn't that complicated....

5xx = Low end, developing market, prepaid, etc
6xx = Slightly higher prices, a few more features
7xx = Low mid range, free on contract
8xx = Mid range, smaller sizes, cheap on contract
9xx = High end, all the bells and whistles, on contract
10xx = Specialty stuff like the 1020

The second number denotes the OS -

x0x = Windows Phone 7.x
x2x = Windows Phone 8.x

The third number denotes carrier variants.

And to answer your question, yes, they do intend to flood the market with versions for every single niche and market. That is exactly how Nokia conquered phones in the last decade, and exactly how Samsung is conquering them now. And it is the right strategy, and is starting to pay off.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By a5cent on 11/5/2013 11:24:42 AM , Rating: 2
> 9xx = High end, all the bells and whistles, on contract
> The third number denotes carrier variants.

So you are saying it makes sense that both the L920 (based on Snapdragon S4) and L929 (based on Snapdragon 800) are in the same "high-end" category? There is a huge generational gap between those two devices that isn't reflected in model number. Additionally, going by your theory, the L929 should merely be a carrier variant of the L920, when it clearly is not.

> Higher numbers are better. End of story really. Is math complicated for you?

Then the L1320 is better than the L920, right? Nope. Everything single thing about the L1320 is worse, except that it has a larger (albeit lower quality) display. I could have compared the L1320 with the L929 and the difference would have been even greater.

The L1020 must also be clearly better than the L920, right? Maybe. Both are EXACTLY the same device, except for the camera module on the L1020. Based on the numbering scheme, most would intuitivly expect a generational gap between the two, where there clearly isn't one.

I could provide many more examples...

Due to the many inconsistencies, the "higher number is better" theory does nothing to help consumers make informed puchasing decisions.

> The second number denotes the OS -
>
> x0x = Windows Phone 7.x
> x2x = Windows Phone 8.x

You're forgetting that Nokia also gave us "x1x" devices, like the L510, L610 and L710. All of these ship with WP7, but then how do you explain the L810, which ships with WP8? Nope, that explanation for Nokia's numbering scheme doesn't work either.

In summery, the third number doesn't consistently denote carrier variant, the second number doesn't consistently denote OS version, and the first two numbers designate absolutely nothing, but at least they do so consistently ;-)

No. I appreciate WP and I think Nokia make great devices, but Reclaimer77 is right. Nokia's naming scheme is a complete and utter mess!


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reflex on 11/5/2013 1:17:35 PM , Rating: 2
The 1520 is the high end phablet.
The 1320 is the low end phablet.

And yes, the 920 is a generation behind the 929. Both are based on WP8. But the 920 is not competing with the 929 and as such they won't be compared to each other. The 929 is competing with the 928, both of which are Verizon variants. And yes, they are both 9xx series(high end), x2x series(WP8) and the 8 vs 9 is the upgraded hardware. Its really NOT difficult to grasp unless you decide to make it difficult.

If I am a Verizon user I have the following Nokia phones -

L822 - Midrange WP8 device, VZ version
L928 - Last year's high end Lumia, WP8, VZ version
L929 - Coming soon, this year's high end, WP8, VZ version

This really is NOT complicated. And the only point you made that seems valid to me is the awkward positioning of the L810, which seemed odd to me at the time as well.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By a5cent on 11/5/2013 2:37:37 PM , Rating: 2
I'm not claiming it's hard. I'm claiming the numbering scheme is just arbitrary enough to be rather useless. There is literally nothing a consumer can expect to correctly and consistently derive from the model number. Even people who care about tech can't intuitivly make sense of it, and even you had to setup a table to explain it. IMHO that's just not intuitive enough, particularly not for the average tech consumer.

Your statement, that the L929 isn't competing with anything beyond the L928 just isn't true either. You can make that claim only for those who choose Verizon first and phone second, but that isn't everyone's approach.

For the average consumer, the model designation "Lumia 1320" is completely useless, as it doesn't help anyone categorize the device. Don't you think calling it, say, a L625 MAX (just as an example) would have been more helpful? Technologically at least, the L1320 is a much closer relative of the L625 than of the L1520, and that suffix would also have been a useful clue.

Let me put it this way:

Do you really think Nokia's current model numbering scheme is as intuitive and descriptive as it could be? If not, then it deserves to be changed, for WP's sake.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reflex on 11/6/2013 2:28:17 AM , Rating: 1
Your statement, that the L929 isn't competing with anything beyond the L928 just isn't true either. You can make that claim only for those who choose Verizon first and phone second, but that isn't everyone's approach.
The crowd you speak if is a tiny minority. Due to contract lock in and multiple lines on an account, it is extremely difficult for the vast majority of cell users to switch. By the time all of the contracts are up the phone they might have switched for is likely obsolete. I used to work for a carrier, I can tell you now from the inside the number of switchers is minimal, and irrelevant. Having model number naming consistently within carrier options is way more important than having it be consistent across all models around the globe.

Do you really think Nokia's current model numbering scheme is as intuitive and descriptive as it could be? If not, then it deserves to be changed, for WP's sake.
Within a carrier it is plenty descriptive. I'm not a fan of MS's normal naming bullshit, in fact "Windows Phone 8" is itself a bullshit name. Keeping it short and sweet is a good thing. So while I would not go out on a limb and say Nokia's scheme is ideal, I do think a model name and a number are a damn good approach. After all it works very well for a wide variety of other products.

And no, adding "MAX" to the end looks terrible.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By a5cent on 11/6/2013 11:31:36 AM , Rating: 2
> And no, adding "MAX" to the end looks terrible.

You feel "Max" is aesthetically unpleasing, that's fine. I don't care. Use your imagination to come up with something you feel is better. Since you aren't willing to say that Nokia's naming approach is ideal, you should be able to. I'm fine with just a brand name and model number too. I'm not advocating for any particular solution. I'm advocating for systematic consistency and transparency accross the board. I don't care how.

The L1320 and L920 are sold world wide, and the inconsistencies I and others mentioned still apply, even if you exclude the L929 from consideration.

I agree that Windows Phone 8 is a BS name. I'm not even convinced it should be called Windows.

IMHO your argument that consistency need only be guaranteed within the line up of a single carrier is BS. I also work for a carrier, albeit in Europe, where carriers have a far weaker hold on customers, and where switching providers is simple. Narrowly limiting your view to only the U.S. market isn't sufficient.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By ritualm on 11/5/2013 12:25:33 AM , Rating: 2
I prefer Nokia's naming scheme over Samsung's. Galaxy is so overused as a product line name, it's not funny.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/5/2013 1:13:46 AM , Rating: 2
Yes but at least you know the difference between a Galaxy S whatever and a Galaxy Note.

You can tell me Nokia's ambiguous catalog system is preferable, but that sounds like bias.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By themaster08 on 11/5/2013 2:05:06 AM , Rating: 2
Whilst I agree somewhat with your opinion, you have to consider the circumstances which Nokia is under.

the iPhone and Galaxy series of smartphones command a significant share of the market. Both of these brands came to rise in a less established market, which means now all carriers want those same devices on their networks.

Nokia no longer has any market dominance and is at the mercy of carriers demanding exclusives. As a result, there are an abundance of different Lumia models which are carrier exclusives, all of which have different names and slightly different appearances/specifications.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reflex on 11/5/2013 3:19:13 AM , Rating: 3
What's ambiguous about it? Higher numbers are better. End of story really. Is math complicated for you?

And no, I highly doubt a typical consumer can tell the difference between a Galaxy S and a Galaxy Note based on the name. They obviously look different, but the names do not mean anything inherently.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/5/2013 7:42:21 AM , Rating: 3
You don't have to be a condescending jerk. I already said in my op I get higher numbers are better, generally. That still tells me nothing about the phone.

How hard is it for YOU to get marketing? There's a reason most products have names and not a generalized serial number. Numbers are cold and lack personality. We don't identify with numbers like we do names.

You're just being way too defensize about this. Grow up, I'm not here to take your precious from you.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By troysavary on 11/5/2013 7:59:46 AM , Rating: 2
So S2, S3, and S4 are not numbers? The fact you are calling him a jerk for disagreeing with you shows me who is really getting defensive.

Your agenda is just as transparent as Tony's. You used to say that Nokia had obsolete hardware in their phones. Now that the hardware is just as good as Samsung, the problem is the numbers annoy you?


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/5/2013 8:53:53 AM , Rating: 2
And if Samsung released them as that, you would have a point. Those are Galaxy S(x)'s devices.

And I called him a jerk because he was being hostile and condescending for no reason. Of course I "get' what numbers are, that wasn't my point.

This isn't some huge manifesto against Nokia, you whiney little tool that follows me around. I just think they need to better identify and differentiate their product lines. Omg the horror!


RE: Doesn't matter.
By troysavary on 11/5/2013 1:58:10 PM , Rating: 3
I don't follow you around. You just post stupid in such volume that no matter what article I am reading, there you are posting stupid. So it is "Hostile and condescending" when someone proves you wrong. but "whiney little tool" is not hostile and condescending for no reason?


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/5/2013 2:08:17 PM , Rating: 2
Yet you always ignore others who post the same opinions or who agree with me. Look below, Labotimizer gets this, is he "stupid" too? Below him, is crisp being stupid? Nah you'll ignore them and pretend its all the big bad Reclaimer

Troll me all you want, ignore all evidence that clashes with your world view, with each pathetic post you only prove I own you.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By troysavary on 11/5/2013 2:15:31 PM , Rating: 2
Own me, you didn't even address a single point I made. You simply jump on any post about any phone not Android and pathetically try to find anything to nitpick about. Lobotomizer doesn't go from thread to thread spreading FUD about non-Google devices. And he simply stated that Nokia could differentiate the products better, which is a valid point. You, on the other hand, claimed Nokia was "annoying" when you would never buy the product anyway, so the naming convention should not affect you one way or another. To be annoyed at the number Nokia attached to their phone tell me you need help.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/6/2013 12:04:36 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
And he simply stated that Nokia could differentiate the products better, which is a valid point.


I said this like 8 times here.

Man you're a joke lol. Start a Reclaimer fan club and get it over with, tryhard.

quote:
pathetically try to find anything to nitpick about.


Some guy made a thread whining about this models lack of SD slot. Again, you're curiously silent about that. Only when I speak, it's an issue to you...


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Mitch101 on 11/6/2013 11:05:30 AM , Rating: 2
He pulls the same excuses and rants against everyone who has a different opinion than his and I agree with your posts on him joining every subject spewing crap.

Its almost like badge of honor when Reclaimer calls you troll or condescending jerk when he does it himself. Like dealing with a child he called it first.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Labotomizer on 11/5/2013 9:37:47 AM , Rating: 2
Perhaps his point is that there should be different names for Low/High/Tablet? I personally don't understand using the Lumia brand for a tablet and calling it a 2520.

Another good example is it would appear the 929 is a better device than the 1320. It's actually better than the 1020 outside of the camera. I think VZW forced them into the 929 name as I was think something like a 1400 series would have made more sense. High end specs but 5" screen. 1500 could have been 6" screen. Or perhaps move to something even better. A 15xx could equate to the 1 equaling the new SnapDragon, the 5 could represent approximate screen size and the last two could be a revision. So the 929 could have been the 1500, the 1520 could have been the 1600. At least that would make more sense.

Then you have the 2520 tablet... Who knows, maybe the 8" tablet with be a 2920? It's really, really hard to tell.

Nokia's numbers are indeed very arbitrary. I'm a huge fan and follow it very close but it's really hard to argue that point. Most people would assume that the bigger number is better. But that's not always the case.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By troysavary on 11/5/2013 2:21:05 PM , Rating: 2
Samsung used the Galaxy brand for their tablets too. Lumia has come to mean Nokia Windows device the same way Galaxy has come to mean Samsung Android device. Hell, Galaxy even means watch now in Samsung speak.

Seems simple to me 1-10 series, phone, 11-19 series, phablet, 20+ series, tablet. If they stick to that naming, there is no confusion. Way less ambiguity than the 20+ different names attached to Galaxy devices.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By crispbp04 on 11/5/2013 11:29:51 AM , Rating: 2
I see what you're saying, to an extent.

The number system is meaningful from a technical standpoint because it offers clear distinction, but you're right in that it is confusing to an average consumer. This is the reason Apple dropped the numbering on iPads. Brand identity is above all. Samsung recognized this, and the success of Galaxy speaks for itself.

The criticality of brand Identity can be shown easily if you look at google trends and type in "Galaxy,Android,iPhone,Droid,Lumia" into the search box.

Droid has the worst attempt at creating a brand because there was too many devices with the branding for people to "get it". It never stuck and nobody would say "hey is that a droid you're using?". Galaxy and iPhone on the other hand... they took it to the bank. Android can thank Samsung for what it is today solely because of the Galaxy line... But I digress...

Back to Nokia with their Lumia brand. The word Lumia itself is not concrete: hard to remember, it's not generic enough, and I think they could have done better with something that sticks easier in someone's mind. It's a shame that the Surface brand wasn't used all along.

They now have several ranges all targeted at different price ranges with their Lumia Brand.. 5xx,6xx,7xx,8xx,9xx,10xx, and now 20xx with their tablets...

They really need to consider modifying their approach, all focused around strengthening brand and recognition:

1) Pick three consistent and distinctive device tiers:
I would suggest a 4", 5", and 6". Let's call them "Lumia", "Lumia S", and "Lumia XL" for this example. Have the same physical measurements for each tier, regardless of build material (plastic vs. metal like the 925vs920).
The accessory market thrives when a device has longevity to it's form factor, as shown by the iPhone 4 thru 4s, 5->5s

2) build out from each tier in the same fashion: budget, Prosumer, Niche
Lumia => + => + Pro (instead of 5xx/6xx/7xx/8xx)
Lumia S => S+ => S+ Pro(instead of 9xx/10xx)
Lumia XL => XL+ => XL+ Pro (instead of 13xx/15xx)

maybe the series can be kept as a subtitle to maintain the ability to be iterative (920 should go to 921, 922, etc. but maintain form factor for accessory success)

3) Drop carrier exclusive customizations. The Lumia 928 blows (I'm on my 3rd one, two cracked screens in less than a month). The Lumia 929 carries over the same flaw as the 928 (no bezel to protect the glass) The 920 was a better phone, should have released a 921. 520,521,820,822,821,620,720,721... list goes on.. that's a joke.

4) Focus on the customization market, MotoX has the right idea

5) Win


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reflex on 11/5/2013 1:26:08 PM , Rating: 2
I am not being condescending. I think you are the one who does not get marketing. Yes, a good name is important. But in generational products the most effective way to give people an idea of progress is numbers. That is why these are called *Lumia* with a number. Just like many car series, just like Schick razors, just like software versions, just like so many things I could get lost mentioning it. Things that sell well and that people remember. In fact, if a product does not have a number automatically people often simply add one by attaching the model year.

People buy their phones on carriers. On each carrier the model numbers are fairly consistent. Even among them they are mostly consistent with only a couple of oddities(the Lumia 810 example above). If I am on any given carrier I have somewhere between 2-4 Nokia options, and the numbering is consistent to denote what class the device is, and what generation it is.

You seem to me to be inventing an issue to have something to complain about. I'd take this over the Samsung route any day.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Monkey's Uncle on 11/5/2013 4:17:47 PM , Rating: 2
Hold on there a sec.

Reading Nokia's naming conventions, the first number is the rear of the phone, the OS platform the second and specific OEM variant is the 3rd. None of these show that the Lumia 929 is a whole new generation of this model phone. In fact nothing about the phone describes that. If I go to Verizon and see a 929 and at AT&T see a 928, I will assume that these carriers are simply using their own number as the 3rd digit.

Please explain to us exactly how we know if we go and buy AT&T's phone that I am NOT getting a snapdragon 800 processor?

At least a manufacturer like Samsung will at least let you know that a phone like the Samsung Galaxy S4 is the latest & greatest generation of that phone model - you will not find a better phone within the Samsung Galaxy S line.

That distinction is not so apparent with Nokia.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Monkey's Uncle on 11/5/2013 4:19:17 PM , Rating: 2
Sheet...

"...the first number is the rear of the phone..." = "...the first number is the tier of the phone..."


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/6/2013 12:07:45 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Hold on there a sec. Reading Nokia's naming conventions, the first number is the rear of the phone, the OS platform the second and specific OEM variant is the 3rd. None of these show that the Lumia 929 is a whole new generation of this model phone. In fact nothing about the phone describes that. If I go to Verizon and see a 929 and at AT&T see a 928, I will assume that these carriers are simply using their own number as the 3rd digit.

Please explain to us exactly how we know if we go and buy AT&T's phone that I am NOT getting a snapdragon 800 processor?

At least a manufacturer like Samsung will at least let you know that a phone like the Samsung Galaxy S4 is the latest & greatest generation of that phone model - you will not find a better phone within the Samsung Galaxy S line. That distinction is not so apparent with Nokia.


QFT.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reflex on 11/6/2013 2:32:36 AM , Rating: 2
Except I don't agree that its a new generation of the phone. It runs the same OS as the previous gen, its just a spec update and slightly different form factor. But for a user its going to have the same functions as the previous gen.

Had it come out post WP8.1 I might see your point, but really this is just a faster/larger Lumia 928.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By kleinma on 11/5/2013 9:35:52 AM , Rating: 2
You could say the same thing about cars. You have your ford explorers and jeep wranglers. Then you have your BWM 528s and your Lexus LS450s

Do people not know the difference between a BWM 3 series and a BMW 7 series?


RE: Doesn't matter.
By troysavary on 11/5/2013 4:15:24 AM , Rating: 3
What about the Galaxy Round, or the Galaxy Ace, or maybe the Galaxy Pocket Neo. Then there are the Galaxy letters, the S line, Y line, R line, M line, and W line. Within just the S4 line, we have the S4, S4 Mini, S4 Zoom, and S4 Active. Don't forget the Galaxy Wonder, Galaxy Mega, Galaxy Grand, Galaxy Fame, Galaxy Young, Galaxy Win, Galaxy Rugby Pro, Galaxy Beam, Galaxy Stellar, Galaxy Chat. I could go on and on, but I hope my point has been made. Tell me, without Googling it, what all those are and how they are different. And I just scratched the surface of the Galaxy line.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/5/2013 9:00:14 AM , Rating: 1
What point? That Samsung, the world leading smartphone seller, uses names rather than random numbers.

Thanks for making MY point.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Labotomizer on 11/5/2013 9:40:56 AM , Rating: 2
I'm not sure the names are any more logical than the numbers I think was his point...


RE: Doesn't matter.
By kleinma on 11/5/2013 12:11:43 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, especially when if you ask any non tech savvy person what kind of phone they have, they will say "galaxy", and that is probably all they will say.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reflex on 11/5/2013 1:21:02 PM , Rating: 2
Yup, this is exactly my point. I do not think most people could tell you what Galaxy product is better than which other Galaxy products, or infer much about them. The only ones where I think they could are the ones that have numbers such as the S series.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By ClownPuncher on 11/5/2013 1:48:46 PM , Rating: 1
You can't even criticize the hardware or OS anymore, so now you're mad about naming conventions? Shit, I'd offer to buy you one if I didn't know you'd get your olive oil fingerprints all over it. ;p


RE: Doesn't matter.
By Reclaimer77 on 11/5/2013 1:58:16 PM , Rating: 1
Left like your Jew ass ever bought something for someone else! :)

And of course I can still criticize that ugly mess of a UI :p


RE: Doesn't matter.
By ClownPuncher on 11/5/2013 2:26:25 PM , Rating: 2
I am cheap, that might be why I'm still using an old Blackberry from 2009.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By troysavary on 11/5/2013 2:09:22 PM , Rating: 2
So, then, explain to me what the difference between that myriad of Galaxies is. Your original point was that Nokia makes a ton of phones with no easy way to tell them apart. I pointed out that Samsung makes a ton more with even less distinction. Most of those modifiers to the Galaxy name give absolutely no clue how they are different.

To give an even more ludicrous example, there is the Galaxy Player line. They are Samsung's answer to the iPod touch. Except in Europe they are called the Galaxy S Wifi. So does that make them a phone that also has wifi? No, that makes them a music player with wifi. But someone who equates Galaxy S with Samsung's flagship phone could be confused there, not realizing he wasn't even looking at a phone.

Nokia's lineup is much less confusing than Samsung's.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By stm1185 on 11/4/2013 9:51:25 PM , Rating: 2
I did the premium Android on contract thing, now I am using a no contract Lumia 521. I miss having better hardware, but I dont miss Android.

Nokia has caught up with Android high end phones on hardware. Snapdragon 800 all around. Which should mean that I'd want to buy this new Lumia (well the T-Mobile variant).

But Google is selling Snapdragon 800 + 5inch 1080p for $350, and I doubt Nokia will be selling this for less then $500.

So for me it's looking like Nexus 5 will be replacing my 521.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By DFranch on 11/5/2013 10:28:12 AM , Rating: 2
That's because Google makes more money from you using their services than they do your phone. They're selling the phone at cost to get you as a customer so they can spam your gmail, send you targeted ads and sell your info. I stopped using gmail when they started adding Google spam e-mail to gmail. I only use YouTube from Google anymore. They seem to get worse every year.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By stm1185 on 11/5/2013 1:46:39 PM , Rating: 2
That's probably true, but does it matter? I am the one paying the $350 compared to probably what $550 - $650. It's not like you have to use the Google services on Android. They have an Outlook app.


RE: Doesn't matter.
By troysavary on 11/5/2013 2:37:07 PM , Rating: 2
The only thing I use my Gmail address for now is my Spam trap. Since Google is gonna Spam me anyway, I might as well send all my other Spam there too.


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