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  (Source: media.salon.com)
France wants answers

France is concerned about the U.S. National Security Agency's (NSA) spy programs and its intentions when it comes to the involvement of French citizens, and now, the country is demanding answers.

France summoned the U.S. ambassador on Monday after French newspaper Le Monde detailed the NSA's actions in spying on French citizens. It turns out the amount and depth of the NSA's spying on France is more than the country was aware of, and it plans to get detailed justification. 

"We have extremely useful cooperation with the United States in the struggle against terrorism, but this cooperation does not justify everything," said French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius. "So we've asked the United States to provide clarifications, explanations and justifications extremely quickly."

According to the U.S. embassy in Paris, Ambassador Charles Rivkin promised Fabius's chief of staff that he would tell Washington about France's NSA worries. 

Le Monde said the NSA recorded 70.3 million bits of French telephone data between December 10, 2012 and January 8, 2013. The NSA also collected tens of thousands of French phone records.

While the NSA says it targets those suspected of terrorism activity or involvement, those part of French business or politics were also spied on through the NSA's surveillance programs. 

Back in July, Paris prosecutors opened a preliminary inquiry into the NSA's Prism program after The Guardian in Britain and Der Spiegel in Germany uncovered a more widespread spying effort by the NSA. 

The NSA has been under the microscope ever since former NSA contractor Edward Snowden uncovered the spying methods used by U.S. intelligence agencies earlier this year, which included collecting data from phones. This was used to fight terrorist attacks, but the public feared for their privacy after such revelations.

In August, reports said that the NSA admitted to touching 1.6 percent of total globe Web traffic. Its technique was to filter data after harvesting it, which led to over-collection on a major scale. 

Days later, an internal audit showed that the NSA broke the law nearly 3,000 times from 2011 to 2012. More specifically, the May 2012 audit revealed that the NSA had abused its power to either accidentally or intentionally spy on Americans and green card holders 2,997 times in that time period. 

Just last week, The Washington Post revealed that the NSA seized the email and IM contacts lists of 700,000+ accounts daily in 2012.

Source: Le Monde



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RE: just wondering...
By theapparition on 10/22/2013 9:57:35 AM , Rating: 2
What's crazy is your reply. The very definition of spying is gathering intelligence from foreign sources. That is not illegal, but other countries may have issues with it and getting caught with foreign secrets in another country will gat you put in their jail. Espionage is a game and every country does it.

What is illegal is spying on your own citizens in the US. That is forbidden, yet our administration has conveniently disregarded the law.

France is just upset now, not because of the US monitoring their citizens, just that the US went further than it initially allowed. By allowing the us to gather intel on their own citizens, it absolves them of spying on their own. It was a win-win for France, except now that its public, they have to save some face.


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