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  (Source: media.salon.com)
France wants answers

France is concerned about the U.S. National Security Agency's (NSA) spy programs and its intentions when it comes to the involvement of French citizens, and now, the country is demanding answers.

France summoned the U.S. ambassador on Monday after French newspaper Le Monde detailed the NSA's actions in spying on French citizens. It turns out the amount and depth of the NSA's spying on France is more than the country was aware of, and it plans to get detailed justification. 

"We have extremely useful cooperation with the United States in the struggle against terrorism, but this cooperation does not justify everything," said French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius. "So we've asked the United States to provide clarifications, explanations and justifications extremely quickly."

According to the U.S. embassy in Paris, Ambassador Charles Rivkin promised Fabius's chief of staff that he would tell Washington about France's NSA worries. 

Le Monde said the NSA recorded 70.3 million bits of French telephone data between December 10, 2012 and January 8, 2013. The NSA also collected tens of thousands of French phone records.

While the NSA says it targets those suspected of terrorism activity or involvement, those part of French business or politics were also spied on through the NSA's surveillance programs. 

Back in July, Paris prosecutors opened a preliminary inquiry into the NSA's Prism program after The Guardian in Britain and Der Spiegel in Germany uncovered a more widespread spying effort by the NSA. 

The NSA has been under the microscope ever since former NSA contractor Edward Snowden uncovered the spying methods used by U.S. intelligence agencies earlier this year, which included collecting data from phones. This was used to fight terrorist attacks, but the public feared for their privacy after such revelations.

In August, reports said that the NSA admitted to touching 1.6 percent of total globe Web traffic. Its technique was to filter data after harvesting it, which led to over-collection on a major scale. 

Days later, an internal audit showed that the NSA broke the law nearly 3,000 times from 2011 to 2012. More specifically, the May 2012 audit revealed that the NSA had abused its power to either accidentally or intentionally spy on Americans and green card holders 2,997 times in that time period. 

Just last week, The Washington Post revealed that the NSA seized the email and IM contacts lists of 700,000+ accounts daily in 2012.

Source: Le Monde



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RE: just wondering...
By StevoLincolnite on 10/22/2013 1:38:27 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Actually countries would not have a problem whit the US spying on it citizens if it was only to prevent terrorism, but the problem is that the US is not trusted to do only that, but also use non terror related data that should be trashed will be used for personal (US) economic gain.


I don't trust my own government, let alone an overseas one that I didn't even vote for.

I actually have the right to my privacy, so the question begs, do I have any legal course of action to prevent the Americans from spying on me?


RE: just wondering...
By vol7ron on 10/31/2013 11:15:53 PM , Rating: 2
I'm glad you threw two continents into caring about you, but I assure you Americans (Mexicans, Canadians, United Statians, Brazilians, Argentinians, et al) don't really care about you. And don't be upset, they don't care about me either, especially United Statians - who have their own lives to worry about.


"We are going to continue to work with them to make sure they understand the reality of the Internet.  A lot of these people don't have Ph.Ds, and they don't have a degree in computer science." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis














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