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Workers in the division will be reassigned

In previous years, plasma technology was very popular with consumers that demanded large-screen televisions. However, as LCD technology became cheaper and image quality improved, the demand for plasma TVs has dwindled dramatically.

A rumor surfaced in March of this year that Panasonic would be exiting the plasma television market. That exit has now been confirmed according to sources that claim to be familiar with the company’s plans. The sources claim that Panasonic will leave the plasma television panel market by the end of March 2014.

 
Panasonic has continued to eliminate areas of its business that have performed poorly (as witnessed by its recent exit from the consumer smartphone market). Plasma televisions accounted for less than 6% of global shipments in 2012 compared to 87% for LCD TVs.

Sony, Panasonic, and Sharp combined for less than 20% of the worldwide flat-panel TV market by revenue. Samsung has 27.7% of the overall market while LG has 15%.

Reuters’ sources also tipped that the several hundred workers that are currently employed at Panasonic in the plasma television operation will be moved to other divisions within the company. 

Source: Reuters



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RE: Too bad
By UzairH on 10/9/2013 11:51:58 AM , Rating: 3
The consensus on the AV forums is that Panasonic plasmas have the best image quality in the business, handily beating all competing LCDs. These forums are now lamenting the death of the plasma.
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1494093/panasonic-to-end...
http://www.avforums.com/forums/avforums-news-notic...

I myself chose a Panasonic plasma based on the reviews on the forums and Cnet
http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/panasonic-t...
http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/panasonic-t...

The only hope now is that Panasonic focuses on OLED and brings large OLED screens to market with proper pricing rather than the eye-bleeding prices LG and Samsung OLED sets currently have.


RE: Too bad
By kwrzesien on 10/9/2013 12:13:55 PM , Rating: 2
I have two myself, GT30 models, in 55" and 60". They have great PQ and nothing in an LCD can come close for the black levels. We used to watch them a lot more until we put in a 135" JVC projection system for our main room, but the plasmas are great for the kitchen and bedroom.

Something to keep in mind is you can't just use them any which way you want, burn-in is still a problem if you leave it on news channels (MSNBC I'm looking at you - giant white bar across the top of the screen on every program) or CN. For movies it can't be beat. Just don't put one in THX mode (which disables the automatic pixel orbiter) for the first six months or you will get permanent burn-in from any channel logo. My 60" has this and a replacement is already approved by BB, I just haven't gotten around to getting something else (OLED oh where are you?).


RE: Too bad
By superstition on 10/9/2013 2:40:21 PM , Rating: 2
OLED is subject to burn in.

Not only that, the blue pixels still have poor longevity. Sharp (I think) has tried to get around this by introducing a white subpixel to reduce the amount of light the blue pixels need to produce.


RE: Too bad
By tng on 10/9/13, Rating: 0
RE: Too bad
By superstition on 10/9/2013 3:32:39 PM , Rating: 2
LCD is subject to burn-in, too. The menu bar on my 2008 Macbook Pro has been slightly burnt in for years. There are photos of LCD TVs used as displays that are badly burnt it.

PWM dimming may help somewhat with this, since the backlight is being turned on and off. Some of the PWM-free constant control LCDs are likely more subject to burn in.

But, my 2008 Panasonic plasma cannot be used as a computer screen due to image retention. It has no problems with TV content, though.

The main worry is true burn in, rather than temporary image retention.


RE: Too bad
By tng on 10/9/2013 3:39:44 PM , Rating: 1
But image retention means that you will need to age the rest of the screen to match the areas that have the IR. This in effect shortens the lifetime of the screen.

LCD cells can pick up and retain residual charges that will then affect the crystal in the cell. These pixels are left with dark or light image problems.


RE: Too bad
By superstition on 10/9/2013 3:57:17 PM , Rating: 2
Not necessarily. For my plasma, the retained image would disappear quickly -- in a matter of minutes.


RE: Too bad
By degobah77 on 10/9/2013 5:01:20 PM , Rating: 3
After the break-in period of about 200 hours on the panel, there's hardly a chance of burn-in. I've had 3 plasmas so far and not a single one even had IR issues - that's after all day/all night gaming sessions and even leaving a DVD menu up all night after passing out.

Some panels are worse than others, and some people just turn brightness and contrast to 100 and turn on their latest XBOX game as soon as they get the TV. That's just tech abuse.


RE: Too bad
By TakinYourPoints on 10/10/2013 2:41:00 AM , Rating: 1
I've had high quality LCD monitors from numerous manufacturers and every single one has shown image retention. Even my NEC 2490WUXi, still the standard for 24" monitors, has image retention. I haven't once had any IR issues with my Pioneer Elite.


RE: Too bad
By Reclaimer77 on 10/11/2013 9:09:06 AM , Rating: 2
Now we know you're full of it. IR on a modern high quality LCD monitor? BS!


RE: Too bad
By superstition on 10/11/2013 11:15:43 PM , Rating: 2
Any monitor can have image retention, although LCDs tend to be less prone to it. PWM (pulse width modulation) may help some, by turning the backlight on and off.

Some high-res LG IPS panels have had complaints about IR, and that includes the retina Macbook screens and some Dell displays.

LCD tends to be much less prone to IR than my 2008 plasma, though. It can't be used even at 0 brightness with my computer, but it doesn't have issues with TV content (including AppleTV/Netflix interfaces.) My first-generation LED backlit 2008 Macbook Pro has had a light area where the menu bar is for years.


RE: Too bad
By TakinYourPoints on 10/22/2013 4:01:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Now we know you're full of it. IR on a modern high quality LCD monitor? BS!


Absofrickinglutely.

I know you're technically ignorant, but come on dude, you should know this if you have a pair of eyeballs.


RE: Too bad
By FITCamaro on 10/10/2013 11:50:48 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah my 3 year old plasma sometimes has a little bit of image retention that goes away once I use it for something else. But after 3 years of playing games and watching TV, no issues with true burn in. I do try to make sure I don't leave anything paused for long periods of time though. If I might need to, I turn off the TV.


RE: Too bad
By superstition on 10/10/2013 11:00:53 PM , Rating: 2
Perhaps my model is unusual, then. I've had it since 2008 and I can't use it connected to a computer because it gets IR right away, even when the brightness is set to 0. Fortunately, the IR doesn't last long, but it makes it useless as a computer monitor or game console display device. Fortunately, also, I don't need to use it for either of those things because I have a 27" BenQ A-MVA monitor that suffices in my living room. It would be nice to have the larger screen size, but it's not that important.

I don't get IR from TV content.


RE: Too bad
By Spuke on 10/9/2013 12:33:20 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The only hope now is that Panasonic focuses on OLED and brings large OLED screens to market with proper pricing rather than the eye-bleeding prices LG and Samsung OLED sets currently have.
Why would their pricing be any different than the other players on the market? Plasma's were priced even more ridiculously when they hit the market. OLED is dirt cheap comparatively. If I had a dedicated home theater there would definitely be a OLED TV in it (specifically LG's 77" OLED 4K TV).


RE: Too bad
By superstition on 10/9/2013 2:42:36 PM , Rating: 2
The cost-benefit ratio of OLED TVs today does not compare to the improvement offered by plasmas when compared to CRTs and projection screens.

More importantly, plasmas offer competitive pictures today for a much lower price. OLED is still a gimmick at current pricing and with its concerns over blue pixel longevity.


RE: Too bad
By Spuke on 10/9/13, Rating: 0
RE: Too bad
By superstition on 10/9/2013 3:07:14 PM , Rating: 2
and CNET, and plenty of others.

Right now, plasma gives people more square inches of quality picture than any other technology for the money. Plus, they offer excellent color, contrast ratio, and motion performance.

No other technology beats plasma at the moment for the price.


RE: Too bad
By Spuke on 10/9/13, Rating: 0
RE: Too bad
By kwrzesien on 10/9/2013 4:30:46 PM , Rating: 2
If you have a dedicated home theater or media room you need to go big & projector (or go home?). Nothing less than 120" should do, and 130-140" sizes are very practical with decent lumen levels from a good Sony or JVC projector and a quality screen (which one depends greatly on your room and lighting, my media room even has windows in the back and it still looks great - it just looks better at night!) That and a great subwoofer and the experience is 1000% more enjoyable, in fact renting HDX Vudu movies has replaced going to the theaters. Go ahead an take that deep dive into AVSForums and you will never look back! :)


RE: Too bad
By Spuke on 10/9/2013 6:11:18 PM , Rating: 2
In all honesty, I would have a projector AND that TV if I had a dedicated home theater (TV would be behind the screen). Oh and I'm very familiar with AVSForums. :)


RE: Too bad
By Mint on 10/9/2013 9:09:27 PM , Rating: 2
Projectors don't get you great real-world blacks, because they have to shine on a white (or whitish) screen. Unless you watch in complete darkness and have all materials covered in black felt, room illumination will give you mediocre blacks. Older or lower-end plasmas also have this problem to a lesser degree (the ones with grayish screens when off).

OLED (and top end plasma) will always give you better picture quality than a projector. The only reason to get a projector is for size and/or cost.


RE: Too bad
By Dr. Kenneth Noisewater on 10/11/2013 7:23:38 PM , Rating: 2
My 70" Vizio LCD is silent and has passive 3D, my 50" 720p plasma is slightly less so and has no 3D. Are there any affordable front projectors that are silent, have passive 3D, and have comparable color gamut and black levels to the latest LCD sets (with zoned LED backlights)? Spinning wheels and cooling fans just won't do, since I had the latter with a 56" RPTV, and I don't have a dedicated room to build a shushing enclosure with adequate ventilation around a projector.


RE: Too bad
By jeepga on 10/9/2013 12:52:39 PM , Rating: 2
And longevity. The Panasonic plasma TV that I purchased in 2004 is still going strong.


RE: Too bad
By Falacer on 10/9/2013 1:40:27 PM , Rating: 2
Same for us, my wife won a 42" Panasonic Plasma oh about 7 years ago from her work. As much as I would love to upgrade to a 55" tv, which would better suit the viewing distance of our current home, the plasma is still going strong after all these years.


RE: Too bad
By Spuke on 10/9/2013 2:47:34 PM , Rating: 2
I'm still rocking a 55" DLP from 2005 as my main TV. More than likely it will be replaced with a LCD as I'm not waiting for OLED prices to come down. I won't be buying a plasma either as I watch a LOT of TV brightly lit rooms.


RE: Too bad
By Mint on 10/9/2013 9:21:54 PM , Rating: 2
It's crazy how the laws of physics scale down. You'd think that millions of mirrors tilting one way or the other thousands of times a second would be prone to mechanical failure. The reality is that DLP is the most reliable display tech ever.

You should check out the mid-range and high-end Panasonic plasmas before assuming they look bad in bright rooms. My brother got a VT60 (yeah, $2500 is a lot) and it looks fantastic in bright rooms.


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