backtop


Print 129 comment(s) - last by overlandpark4m.. on Sep 25 at 10:15 PM


Federighi, Cook, and Ive  (Source: Bloomberg)
Cook, Jony Ive and Craig Federighi talk about the new iPhones, market share and the competition

Only a week after the big iPhone 5S/5C reveal and a day before their launch, Apple CEO Tim Cook says he isn't worried about iPhone market share, and even managed to throw a few stones at the likes of Nokia and Google's Android. 

Bloomberg BusinessWeek's Sam Grobart sat down with Cook to talk about Apple's place in the mobile market, and whether Cook is worried that competitors like Android will continue gaining market share in various areas as Apple continues to offer luxury-priced phones that appeal to only certain markets. 

“There’s always a large junk part of the market,” said Cook during the interview. “We’re not in the junk business. There’s a segment of the market that really wants a product that does a lot for them, and I want to compete like crazy for those customers. I’m not going to lose sleep over that other market, because it’s just not who we are. Fortunately, both of these markets are so big, and there’s so many people that care and want a great experience from their phone or their tablet, that Apple can have a really good business.”

Apple recently announced the expected high-end iPhone 5S, which has a starting unsubsidized price of $650. The iPhone 5C, which was believed to be a budget version of the iPhone for emerging markets like China, was expected to be priced at a "budget" range. However, its unsubsidized price is only $100 less than the 5S. 

While Apple is working hard to make deals with China Unicom, China Telecom and China Mobile, many wondered if Apple would be able to sell to this market considering the still-high price of the iPhone 5C. 


iPhone 5C

“We never had an objective to sell a low-cost phone,” said Cook. “Our primary objective is to sell a great phone and provide a great experience, and we figured out a way to do it at a lower cost.”

Google's Android is a good example of an operating system that spans both high and low end smartphones, offering a vast price range for those looking to shop on either side of the spectrum. This gives Android the ability to reach various markets, and continue gaining market share. In fact, IDC said nearly 80 percent of the world’s smartphones run Android. It also said the average unsubsidized price for a smartphone fell from $450 to $375 last year. 

But Cook brushes this off, saying that customers tend to buy Android devices and dump them in a drawer while an iPhone is the smartphone they truly use.

“Does a unit of market share matter if it’s not being used? For us, it matters that people use our products. We really want to enrich people’s lives, and you can’t enrich somebody’s life if the product is in the drawer.”

Cook added that he doesn't see Android as just one entity competing against Apple. Rather, the operating system is so fragmented that many users are running versions as old as Gingerbread from three years ago. 

Here's a breakdown: About 45 percent of Android users are on Jelly Bean, the latest version of Android, while 31 percent are still on Gingerbread and 22 percent are on Ice Cream Sandwich. Apple says 93 percent of its users were on iOS 6 at the end of June.


iPhone 5S

“And so by the time they exit, they’re using an operating system that’s three or four years old," said Cook. "That would be like me right now having in my pocket iOS 3. I can’t imagine it.”

Apple's idea is that having one company work on both the hardware and the software makes a big difference when it comes to user experience, instead of Google's method where Android is given out to various hardware manufacturers like Samsung. 

Jony Ive (senior vice president of Design at Apple) and Craig Federighi (senior vice president of Software Engineering at Apple) -- who also took part in the interview -- agreed that the new iPhones marry hardware and software better than other smartphones. And while the iPhone doesn't receive new OS versions or updates as often as Android, they said that Apple doesn't just push out new features for the sake of having them; they take the time to perfect them, and make them better than anyone else. 

“New? New is easy. Right is hard,” said Federighi.

Cook also addressed the Apple/Microsoft comparison of the 1990s, where Microsoft licensed its Windows operating system to hardware makers like Dell and Hewlett-Packard while Apple only used its operating system on its own Mac hardware line. This allowed Microsoft to gain a ton of market share at that time while Apple's plummeted, and many wonder if Apple is making the same mistake in its competition with Android. 

Speaking of Microsoft, Cook said the recent $7.2 billion purchase of Nokia's devices and services unit shows that more companies are trying to follow Apple's lead. He also took a jab at Nokia, saying that it's failure to innovate led to its end as a mobile leader.

“Everybody is trying to adopt Apple’s strategy,” said Cook. “We’re not looking for external validation of our strategy, but I think it does suggest that there’s a lot of copying, kind of, on the strategy and that people have recognized that importance.
 
"I think [Nokia] is a reminder to everyone in business that you have to keep innovating and that to not innovate is to die.”

The iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C hit store shelves tomorrow, and while iPhone market share sits below that of Android and Apple stock has taken a dive since its $700+ high last September, Cook believes that the company is doing the right thing.

Source: Bloomberg Businessweek



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Oh dear.
By silverblue on 9/19/2013 2:21:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
“Does a unit of market share matter if it’s not being used? For us, it matters that people use our products. We really want to enrich people’s lives, and you can’t enrich somebody’s life if the product is in the drawer.”

I don't know anybody with two smartphones (excluding one they've replaced after a contract has finished, and even then they may cash it in or give it to a friend), but one thing I do know is that more and more of the people I know are buying or, at the very least, considering Samsung or Nokia phones. I haven't heard more than a brief mention of the new iPhones at work whereas there was a significantly higher amount of interest when the 5 came out.

And, in any case, sometimes it doesn't matter how much you innovate if people aren't going to notice. I don't see an iPhone with a groundbreaking camera, or stereo speakers, or NFC, or wireless charging - all things that competitors have brought to the table. What's more, Apple adopted the aspect ratio of competing devices with the iPhone 5, and has seemingly latched onto the idea of a polycarbonate unibody being a good thing two years after Nokia first launched the Lumia series (not saying they invented the idea, but it's certainly the most widespread implementation).

It's a bit rich of a company, one that has admitted to stealing ideas in the past, to accuse another of not innovating enough. Nokia didn't leap onto the Android bandwagon and could've provided some very good devices had they done so, but they took a risk with Windows Phone and they practically own that platform. There's no way they could've competed with Samsung - hell, HTC can't. Nokia dared to be different, just like Apple did, its only crime is not doing it years earlier.

You also have to ask whether Apple would've made the iPad Mini or iPhone 5C if Steve Jobs was still around. It's not exactly innovative to make a different sized or shaped version of an existing device.

The Android version breakdown shows 45% are on v4 and up. Considering they own 80% of the global market, that would mean Jelly Bean has a much larger market share than Apple altogether. I do believe they've missed out a couple of percent of users still on Froyo.




"This is about the Internet.  Everything on the Internet is encrypted. This is not a BlackBerry-only issue. If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki