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Tegra Note will launch around the world via NVIDIA hardware partners

NVIDIA has officially unveiled its new Tegra Note tablet platform that is powered by its Tegra 4 processor. The new Tegra Note is a complete Android tablet platform that will be brought to the market by NVIDIA partners.

The Tegra Note platform will feature NVIDIA branding, hardware, and software (which supports over the air updates). NVIDIA says that the tablet also features an attractive industrial design and a number of available accessories. Perhaps the best news is that the tablet platform enjoys a number of partners in the game development arena.

NVIDIA says that Tegra Note tablets will be available starting at $199. The seven-inch IPS display with a resolution of 1280 x 800. The tablet has a five-megapixel rear camera and a VGA resolution front camera. 16GB of storage is included onboard and the tablet features a microSD card slot for additional storage expansion up to 32 GB.

 
The tablet uses a Tegra 4 chip with a 72-core GeForce GPU and a quad-core Cortex A15 CPU. The CPU also has a fifth battery-saving core. The tablet promises battery life of over 10 hours for HD video playback.

NVIDIA says that over the next several months its partners with bring Tegra Note tablets to consumers globally, including EVGA and PNY in the U.S. A number of manufacturers will also be bringing the tablet to market in Europe, Asia-Pacific, and India.

Source: NVIDIA



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RE: Crappy Res.
By tayb on 9/18/2013 11:55:28 AM , Rating: 1
Why? What is the point of increasing the resolution so high on a 7" tablet? The individual pixels are already not discernible at practical viewing distances. Unless you use your tablet with a freaking microscope the higher resolution is worthless. Not only that but it is actually a detriment to performance and battery life. Having to push twice as many pixels is quite a bit more work. And for what?

I would much prefer a snappier UI with better performance and battery life than extra pixels that I do not need. I have the new Nexus 7 and the thing heats up browsing the web! I'm not unhappy with the tablet but I think they would have been much better off replacing the panel with a 1280x800 panel.

This resolution crap has simply become a measuring contest for fanboys. It's practically worthless to end users.


RE: Crappy Res.
By karimtemple on 9/18/2013 12:41:50 PM , Rating: 2
I agree that a lower resolution is better for performance, and clearly nVidia is going for the gamer vote. But the tablet getting warm really isn't much of a drawback for 1200p. That's no big deal.

Also, my vision is pretty good and on a 7-inch diagonal the difference between 800p and 1200p is definitely discernible. You'd have a much better argument there if we were talking about phones.

Ultimately I think 1200p is a much better configuration. Lowering the resolution is a quick way to get better gaming performance and to avoid the SoC throttling to dump heat, but that's just the thing: gaming on Android is nothing to write home about, let alone the tablet form factor. I'd go with a 1200p device because I don't care about gaming on Android, but I do like it when texts and images look better.


RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/18/13, Rating: 0
RE: Crappy Res.
By Mint on 9/18/2013 2:09:26 PM , Rating: 4
You're nuts if you think people can't tell the difference between 480x800 and 720p or better.

Load up any web page with text that isn't giant and the difference is obvious. For pictures, dialing people, UI, etc? Sure, you won't care. But for smartphone usage 720p makes a big difference.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/18/2013 2:39:44 PM , Rating: 2
"You're nuts if you think people can't tell the difference between 480x800 and 720p or better."

This guy cant tell the difference . http://i.imgur.com/hQHeh0y.jpg


RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/18/2013 5:25:10 PM , Rating: 1
I know for a fact that they can't. Not on a cellphone-sized screen. And I've proven it, as described above.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/18/2013 5:49:26 PM , Rating: 2
I cant tell if you are just being sarcastic or not.

Clearly there is a HUGE difference and if you or anyone else cant see it, they need an eye exam, badly, right now, before they drive.



RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/18/2013 9:56:30 PM , Rating: 2
There's very little chance that you can see better than I can.

Not being sarcastic in any way.

Do the test yourself as I described.

It doesn't make any difference beyond a certain point. And that point is far, far below 1080p, or even 720p, on a phone-sized display.


RE: Crappy Res.
By aegisofrime on 9/19/2013 11:05:05 AM , Rating: 2
Sorry, but I can tell a difference between the 720p screen on my Nexus 4, and the 1080p screen on my friend's HTC One.

Claiming that the entire population of humanity can't tell the difference just because you can't reeks not just of arrogance, but delusion.


RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/19/2013 11:42:58 AM , Rating: 2
Thanks for not reading my posts before commenting.

It's not just me. It's me recruiting unsuspecting lay people at various locations to participate in a little demonstration. I've done it 3 or 4 times now.

If you tell people that the lesser-spec screen is actually the better-spec screen, the power of suggestion pulls through and they agree with you.

If you tell them to pick which screen has the better display, it's 50/50.

It's the way it is, and you can dismiss it all you want to, but I've done this in the real world and I know for a fact that it is true.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/19/2013 1:26:25 PM , Rating: 2
"Do the test yourself as I described."

I see plenty phones almost every day. I have done it. I see differences from 480 to 720 and even 720 to 1080. I can see pixels on an iPhone5 and cannot on an LG G2.

"It doesn't make any difference beyond a certain point. And that point is far, far below 1080p, or even 720p, on a phone-sized display."


Bro, I am telling you, you are wrong. There is something wrong with your "near" vision if you cant tell the difference. Some people cant see the difference between 720 and 1080 at 5 inches and some can, but if you cant see a difference at 480 to 720 or 1080, you really have an eye problem that you should heave checked.


RE: Crappy Res.
By flyingpants1 on 9/18/2013 4:54:48 PM , Rating: 2
Based on what you said, you likely have poor vision.

It's even possible to tell the difference between the S3's pentile AMOLED, and the HOX LCD, it's not even that difficult.

I hope to God these guys stop increasing resolution for a while now that they've hit 1080p. We have 1080p screens, but no NAND to put HD content on, and no battery life to use it with, and the crappiest speakers in the world.


RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/18/2013 5:23:55 PM , Rating: 2
Nope. 20/20, thanks to Lasik.

Laying my phone next to something with a vastly "superior" screen will result in a 50/50 guess if you have lay people try to pick the "better" one. And if you tell them that mine has the better screen to start with, they'll agree.

The resolution wars are so far past making any functional difference it's just ridiculous.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/18/2013 5:53:40 PM , Rating: 2
"Nope. 20/20, thanks to Lasik"

You do realize that 20/20 is not perfect, its average right., That puts you in the middle. If you cant tell the difference in the scenario above, I would go to your Lasik center and demand a refund because they lied to you. You do not see 20/20. Not at 8-16 inches where cell phones are generally held.


RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/18/2013 9:57:07 PM , Rating: 2
Sorry, you're wrong.

Period. And I've personally done the demonstrations to prove it.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/19/2013 8:42:01 AM , Rating: 2
In this case, the science eludes you as badly as your eyes do.

If you cannot see the difference onan 800x480 phone vs 1280x720 or even 1920x1080 your eyes are not funtioning properly at close range (8-16 inches). They just arent. Anyone you tested with that couldnt tell the difference also has vision problems at close range.

The difference isnt just minimal , its huge.


RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/19/2013 10:47:47 AM , Rating: 2
I've proven it. You're wrong. Just stop.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/19/2013 1:28:36 PM , Rating: 2
LOL. OK. I give up. You don't want to admit you have a nearsightedness issue, then fine. But please realize that there isn't just a small difference, its pretty major. Just because everyone's eyes cant detect it, doesn't mean it inst true.


RE: Crappy Res.
By Motoman on 9/19/2013 3:08:20 PM , Rating: 2
Dude...it's not *me*.

It's real people in the real world, some wearing glasses/contacts, some not.

Get that through your head. You keep trying to tell *me* that I have eyesight issues, and you're ignoring the fact that I've actually done this comparison test in the real world, with *other* people.

Just people who happened to be in the office.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/19/2013 3:28:04 PM , Rating: 3
Fine, your eyesight isnt an issue. Let's just leave it at you dont see a difference... Well I do, and so do many others. Are we all hallucinating? When I look at a 800x480 4 inch screen and see pixels am I imagining it? When I look at a 5 inch 1080 screen and dont see pixels, is that real? Come on, I see it, many others here have said the same thing. Are you saying we are all lying? I am telling you I see it.


RE: Crappy Res.
By TakinYourPoints on 9/18/2013 6:12:27 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
The 480x800 display on my Samsung Galaxy Relay is *perfect*.


Ah yes, another DT post defending third-rate tech as "perfect". How totally surprising.


RE: Crappy Res.
By EricMartello on 9/20/2013 1:12:21 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Exactly. It became ridiculous a looooooong time ago.

The 480x800 display on my Samsung Galaxy Relay is *perfect*. You're a liar if you want to pretend you can see any pixellation of anything. I can't possibly imagine anything on that screen looking any better than it does, because it's already entirely bereft of issues.


Not true. On digital panels the pixel resolution usually has a 1:1 relationship with PPI (pixels per inch), but this isn't always the case on phones since their physical size is limited by keeping the dimensions of the device close to something "portable".

The optimal PPI depends on the screen size and the typical viewing distance. Applies to TVs, monitors and yes, even portable handheld devices.

quote:
I've even proven the point to a large number of fanboys thusly: take your S4 (or whatever...doesn't matter) with it's 1080x1920 display, set it next to my phone and then do the following:

1. Get a few unsuspecting victims...I mean "participants"
2. Tell one set of them that the Relay has a better resolution, and ask them if they can tell by looking at the 2 phones...they'll say "yes, that one appears to look better to me."
3. Tell another set that they have to decide for themselves which screen is the better display. It'll be 50/50.


Firstly, the metric is not about being able to see "pixelation" or a lack of it, nor are we worried about being able to discern individual pixels or not - if THAT was all the mattered then you might be onto something, but that's not the only issue were looking at here.

The Galaxy S2 with 800x480 resolution has 219 PPI which is pretty good.

The Galaxy S4 with 1920x1080 has 441 PPI, more than double, and it does make a difference even though the S4's screen is only slightly larger than the S2's.

A 1080p pixel resolution provides over 2 million pixels vs 384,000 pixels of 800x480. That's a huge 520% difference, and the additional pixels translate to better detail on images and text, especially with color transitions (gradations) as well as edges.

Why? Because one pixel can only display one color at a time, and since the pixel is part of a pattern that approximates the color of an image, the more pixels you have in a given area, the greater the potential color detail and sharpness. The maximum number of unique colors you can display simultaneously is limited by your pixel resolution as well as the physical resolution of your screen.

You may not notice the difference immediately just by glancing at the phone's main menu, but to say there is no benefit to having higher resolution is ignorant. You would see the difference when watching video, looking at photos or even with certain games.

quote:
Screen resolution hit "perfect" a long time ago. It's all pure BS now, and the above exercise proves it. And it makes the gadget nerds all verklempt, which is fun to watch anyway.


Completely false. This is just as dumb as saying there is no practical reason for digital cameras to have more than 8 MP.

In addition to the better potential image quality you get with higher resolutions; both motion (animation) and touch sensitivity is improved.

Being able to have a non-mobile website viewable and readable without zooming in is another benefit you get with higher resolution, as well putting less strain on your eyes.


RE: Crappy Res.
By retrospooty on 9/18/2013 1:36:56 PM , Rating: 3
"What is the point of increasing the resolution so high on a 7" tablet? The individual pixels are already not discernible at practical viewing distances"

Yes, they are. If you cant look at a Nexus 7 2012 and 2013 and tell the difference immediately you need to have your eyes checked. I get not caring about the quality difference, and by all means, if you dont mind it, save some $$$ and get a cheaper model, but dont act like it doesnt exist. The Screen on my Nexus 7 2013 is the absolute best feature on it.

"I have the new Nexus 7 and the thing heats up browsing the web!"

Yours may have an issue. Mine goes indefinitely running anything and doesn't get hot at all. Amazing battery life too.


"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -- Isaac Asimov

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