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Reports say consumers want the more colorful iPhone 5C

IPhone 5S inventory is significantly lower than that of the iPhone 5C, according to mobile carriers. 

A new report from All Things D says that carriers have received the iPhone 5S in extremely low numbers for the Friday launch. One carrier even said it will have "grotesquely unavailable inventory.”

However, the carriers say they have a plentiful amount of iPhone 5Cs available, which will launch this Friday as well. 


So why the gap in supply? All Things D says it's because customers prefer the colorful 5Cs as opposed to the 5S. The 5C comes in five vibrant colors while the high-end 5S comes in grey (black), silver and gold. 

The report notes that demand for the high-end version may be less than expected, as well.

The iPhone 5C is touted as the "budget" iPhone, sporting a $99 price tag for the 16GB model and $199 for the 32GB model (both with two-year contracts). The iPhone 5S runs $199, $299, and $399 for 16GB 32GB, and 64GB versions respectively. Both phones are expected to launch at Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile this Friday. 

Source: All Things D



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RE: Is this any surprise?
By TakinYourPoints on 9/18/2013 6:03:26 PM , Rating: 4
From Anandtech: http://www.anandtech.com/show/7335/the-iphone-5s-r...

quote:
The iPhone 5s is quite possibly the biggest S-update we've ever seen from Apple.

...

The A7 SoC is seriously impressive. Apple calls it a desktop-class SoC, but I'd rather refer to it as something capable of competing with the best Intel has to offer in this market. In many cases the A7's dual cores were competitive with Intel's recently announced Bay Trail SoC.


It may be an iterative design, but what an iterative design! The A7 is benching about as fast as a 2010 mobile Core 2 Duo. Its as fast as the fastest Bay Trail Atom while drawing a lot less power and being on a much crappier process.

Its also worth noting that the 5C benches very favorably against the (internally) much newer GS4.

http://images.anandtech.com/graphs/graph7335/58181...
http://images.anandtech.com/graphs/graph7335/58180...
http://images.anandtech.com/graphs/graph7335/58179...

This isn't leapfrogging, this is pulling away.

I have no need for a new phone. I like to keep mine for at least two years and the iPhone 5 is still plenty fast. Its still very impressive what Apple is doing with their silicon. A thinner lighter iPad with an A7X though, that's something I'll pick up.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By Tony Swash on 9/18/13, Rating: 0
RE: Is this any surprise?
By Reclaimer77 on 9/18/2013 6:43:57 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Meanwhile all the 5s reviewers are saying the same thing which is once you start using the iTouch fingerprint recognition system going back to devices that use unlock pin codes feels clunky and absurd, and replicating iTouch will prove extremely difficult and possibly impossible because Apple owns all the patents for the basic technology that's involved.


This is a sales tactic more than a useful security feature. Most people don't lock their phones anyway. But those who use pin coded or other methods, have a far more secure phone than the iPhone.

And save the marketing speech for someone who isn't ignorant. There hasn't been a single viable fingerprinting method that can't be defeated by using a lifted print. And guess what your iPhone has all over it? Your thumbprints.

Just wait, in a few weeks the Internet will be ablaze with how-to videos showing how easily defeated iTouch is from a security standpoint using lifted prints.

Using the favorite term of Android bashers like yourself, iTouch is a gimmick.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By Tony Swash on 9/18/13, Rating: 0
RE: Is this any surprise?
By ritualm on 9/18/2013 9:30:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You are such a technical neophyte.

Written by someone who is himself literally a technical neophyte.
quote:
Somehow all the technical discussion... has passed by you.

There is nothing unique about the fingerprinting system you're so fond of raving about. The US government had it for decades. PCs had it for years. Even Android phones beat Apple by at least three years.
quote:
This fingerprint technology is so superior

Indeed, it is so superior that most security experts - whose reputations are worth their weight in gold - highly recommended it be used in conjunction with other security measures.

It is not foolproof.

It is easily circumvented with methods a thousand times cheaper than the phone itself.

It provides absolutely zero security, in return you willingly give the NSA a full, verifiable, and traceable copy of your fingerprint with your explicit permissions.

It is more complicated than entering a PIN, let alone slide-to-unlock.

Nope, your tactics aren't flying past my BS detectors.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By Monkey's Uncle on 9/19/2013 11:14:43 AM , Rating: 2
Tony, Tony, Tony *shakes head*

Fingerprint biometric security systems have been in use for several years now in far more complex systems than an iPhone. I've had the misfortune of trying to use them in many iterations only to disable them due to the constant hassle of misreading and having to re-register my fingerp4rints multiple times.

As well most of my colleagues that have used these biometric devices have experienced the same pain and themselves proceeded to disable them.

At best biometric security devices are hit and miss. At worst they actually hamper your ability to use the device.

Go ahead and shout your joy over this gimmick foo the highest mountain all you like. I would also love to see your tears when your uber-secure iPhone locks you out (and possibly erases itself) of it because you scuffed the skin on your thumb and it no longer recognizes you.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By Kiffberet on 9/19/2013 8:15:13 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Most people don't lock their phones anyway.


You just made that statement up, didn't you?


RE: Is this any surprise?
By retrospooty on 9/19/2013 8:54:35 PM , Rating: 2
"Just wait, in a few weeks the Internet will be ablaze with how-to videos showing how easily defeated iTouch is from a security standpoint using lifted prints"

Hehehe

http://www.slashgear.com/iphone-5s-fingerprint-sca...


RE: Is this any surprise?
By ritualm on 9/18/2013 9:10:14 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
The iPhone 5s is easily and by a wide margin faster than the fastest Android handset.

Wrong. It's barely any faster, and the problem is we've already reached the point in smartphones where the current stuff is "fast enough" for most people.

So the only thing Apple can lay claim to is 64-bit (some bragging rights in benchmarking, but effectively zero benefits for all current users, because synthetic benchmarks do not translate to a better daily usage experience!). "by a wide margin faster"... yeah right.
quote:
The M7 co-processor unlocks a whole new way to do versatile and super power efficient location and activity monitoring

Yawner. Nothing new to see here.
quote:
The iPhone 5s is the first handset to use Bluetooth Low Energy technology

Wrong. The iPhone 4s from October 5, 2011 had Bluetooth 4.0 LE.
quote:
There is nothing like the ARMv8 architecture...

The doom and gloom you're so fond of predicting against all things Android have not happened once. You're akin to the doomsday prophets who routinely claim we're all gonna die tomorrow or some other chosen date. They've been proven wrong time and time again.
quote:
Meanwhile all the 5s reviewers are saying

Touch ID is not about security, it's all about convenience. Or, in layman's terms, it's worthless to me. I've never bothered setting up a PIN on my 4s at all, because I know - and you don't - that if my phone is stolen/missing, all the data on it is going to be compromised, so a PIN is meaningless.
quote:
which sets a new benchmark for a top end phone

It's funny. You keep dismissing benchmarks as meaningless when Android handsets beat your fruit logo company's phones, then turn around and say how it's meaningful when your stuff's doing the rounds. Hypocritical much?
quote:
Apple are set for another bumper growth year.

Not gonna happen. This ain't 2007. Your competitors are no longer asleep in their driver's seats. Your favorite "benchmark" phone has a key component in which abysmal yields directly affect global inventories.

And your best answer? More of the same.

Your shipment of fail has arrived.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By Tony Swash on 9/19/2013 7:49:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Wrong. It's barely any faster, and the problem is we've already reached the point in smartphones where the current stuff is "fast enough" for most people.


It may be that Android handsets are fast enough for the lower end stuff that's available on that platform but over in iOS land we have lots of power apps and very high end games that will get a big boost from this massive CPU speed up.

This info graphic brings home the power of the new Apple designed CPU.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/x1brett/9797549125/

The speed of the new A7 chip is a game changer. And there is more to come because Apple designs it's own chips and can achieve the sort of SOC integration between hardware and OS that is impossible with Android handset made from off the shelf generic parts.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By ritualm on 9/19/2013 8:56:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
achieve the sort of SOC integration between hardware and OS

Just last night, I found an Android app that uses the NFC tech in my SGS4 to read transactions I made on a suICa card.

No such app exists in iOS land, why?

Because Apple never integrated any NFC hardware into their hardware.

Oh and by the way: I don't give a rat's ass about your fancy schmancy "performance graphs". How many of those "lots of power apps and very high end games" do you use daily? So few, you can count with one hand. Which means all of that massive speed up ends up going totally unused.

In other words - that A7 SoC is useless.

Your shipment of fail has arrived.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By Reclaimer77 on 9/18/2013 6:30:34 PM , Rating: 2
What is your agenda here? I know the phone is fast. EVERY new iPhone is fast. And yet every new iPhone is completely missing the feature set that I interact with my phone on a daily basis. Hell it's 2013 and iOS is still completely unable to convey any information to the user (outside of notifications) without requiring an app to be launched.

Mobile apps just aren't all that demanding when it comes down to it. Like you said, the iPhone 5 is still plenty fast and responsive.

But I acknowledge that I'm not Apple's target demographic. They aren't making products for people like me, and that's fine. If you want me to come out and say I'm impressed by their custom SoC's performance, don't worry, I am. But to me the product as a whole is very iterative, and you know what, for people who love the iPhone that's not a bad thing.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By Tony Swash on 9/18/2013 6:40:14 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Mobile apps just aren't all that demanding when it comes down to it.


That may be true on Android which has far fewer high end apps and games but the top range stuff you can get on iOS will benefit from the new speed.

I forget to mention that the new iPhones come with the new iOS7 which has been rewritten and redesigned form the ground up, and which makes the feeble point releases that Android now gets look pretty pathetic especially as even those feature light incremental upgrades take years to actually roll out onto actual handsets in any great number.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By ritualm on 9/18/2013 9:57:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
the new iOS7 which has been rewritten and redesigned form the ground up

Yet it looks like someone took a dump on a plate and used it to doodle the wall with the gooey poo. Hardly revolutionary at all.
quote:
which makes the feeble point releases... pretty pathetic

Upgrades under the hood beats your "coat of pastel watercolor paint" iOS7 nonsense.


RE: Is this any surprise?
By troysavary on 9/18/2013 11:35:41 PM , Rating: 2
Rewriting the kernel for a new instruction set is not "upgrades under the hood?"


RE: Is this any surprise?
By retrospooty on 9/19/2013 8:51:57 AM , Rating: 2
Only you would be this impressed by "the same exact thing only faster"

The 64bit thing is a good move, and will play out in the future, but simply being faster was expected. Jeebus, any high end phone from 2012 is plenty fast enough. Same tiny low res, low PPI screen, and giant bezel. Same lack of features... I know, its good enough for most users, and obviously its a popular phone, well built and fast, but as someone that visits tech sites and is somewhat technical, would you like it to have more?

To quote an occasionally wise man "Ah yes, another DT post defending third-rate tech"


"Nowadays you can buy a CPU cheaper than the CPU fan." -- Unnamed AMD executive














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