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Texas just shut Tesla down on the state level

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is determined to win the dealership fight by any means necessary -- even going to the feds.

A new report from Automotive News says Musk may take the dealership fight to the federal level since working at the state level hasn't been completely successful.

Here's the deal: Musk believes that auto dealerships don't do a very good job at selling specialty cars like Tesla's high-end electric vehicles (Roadster, Model S). Hence, he's looking to run his own Tesla stores around the U.S. where he believes his cars will get a fair shot at being sold. 

However, auto dealerships are fighting back. If Tesla were to succeed at opening its own dealerships, other automakers could try to do the same. The National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) said that dealerships are necessary to ensure competitive prices for customers, and that it will continue to defend franchise and consumer laws in the states.

While Tesla has been able to fight off auto dealership assaults in some states -- like North Carolina -- it has had a more difficult time in others, like Texas. The state has laws that protect the franchise dealership system where car manufacturers are not allowed to run and own dealerships -- and Texas isn't looking to budge on that issue.


Musk has worked quite a bit to eliminate the conventional dealership model for his cars in Texas, going as far as supporting a recent Texas bill called House Bill 3351, which would allow distributors and manufacturers of electric vehicles (EVs) only to sell directly to customers without the use of dealerships. He also offered to build a second manufacturing plant in Texas, and is even trying to appeal to Texas consumers by discussing a design for an electric pickup truck that would be stronger than any current gasoline truck.

Tesla made a case before the state legislature this past session that Tesla should be one exception to the state laws, and be allowed to sell its cars to the public directly. The state legislature blew it off without even taking a vote, and that was that. According to NPR's State Impact, the reason was because Tesla failed to lobby as much as the dealership associations. Tesla spent about $345,000 in lobbying while dealerships spent about $780,000.

Texas isn't alone in attempting to keep Tesla at bay. New York, Massachusetts and others have attempted to shut down Tesla's stores as well. 

With that, Musk is looking into taking his fight to the federal level in order to bypass each state's restrictions. Musk may lobby Congress or file a federal claim saying that the state laws banning Tesla-owned dealerships are unconstitutional. 

Musk said in April that he'd be willing to make the fight a federal battle. 

"If we're seeing nonstop battles at the state level, rather than fight 20 different state battles, I'd rather fight one federal battle," said Musk.

Sources: Automotive News [1], [2]



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Tesla is here to stay
By bigi on 9/17/2013 12:34:27 PM , Rating: 3
Fvck them. Tesla is here to stay.

It is sad that people will go out of state to buy and drive Teslas.




RE: Tesla is here to stay
By Motoman on 9/17/2013 1:01:59 PM , Rating: 3
Has nothing to do with Tesla or not. It has to do with the ridiculous manipulation of the consumer auto market by having state governments require dealership networks.

Good on Tesla for pressing the issue though. The vacated-tube supertrain thing is nothing but a pipe dream (heh), but this is a good social issue that he's taking on this time.


RE: Tesla is here to stay
By Samus on 9/17/2013 1:18:12 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly. These types of laws violate the free market and cripple smaller startup's. The thing is Tesla isn't really a startup anymore...they *could* run a dealership network, but I stand for their reasons not too. Buying a car through a dealer is so stressful I don't even bother. My last 3 vehicles have been from a private party because negotiations are easy, there is no BS fees or paperwork, and it takes 5 minutes, not 5 hours before I'm driving away.


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