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No injuries were reported

A Google Street View car recently went on a hit-and-run spree in Indonesia, only stopping after crashing into a truck. 

The Google Street View car, which was driven by an unnamed Indonesian man, was involved in three vehicle accidents on Wednesday. He first hit a minivan just outside of Jakarta in the Bogor region, according to AFP. 

The Google Street View driver allegedly stopped after this first incident, and went with the minivan driver to an auto repair shop to have the damages looked at. But the Google driver panicked over the potential cost of such repairs, and fled the scene. 

The minivan driver followed the Google car for approximately 3km before the Street View vehicle hit yet another minivan. 


The Google car didn't stop after the second hit. Instead, he continued on until he finally crashed into a parked truck. This was the third and final hit in the chase. 

The front of the Google vehicle was damaged after the three hits, and the windshield had been smashed in. 

"We take the safety of our Street View operations very seriously, and though we're glad everyone is OK and that no serious injuries were reported, we're sorry for any damage caused," said Google in a statement. 

This isn't the first time a Google Street View car has gotten into trouble. Back in January of this year, one of the vehicle's was blamed for hitting a donkey in India

Sources: ZDNet, AFP





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By foxalopex on 9/16/2013 12:28:48 PM , Rating: 3
For a second I thought it was one of Google's self-drive automated cars that went on a crime spree but it turns out it's a regular, er more like "crazy" driver that did. I wonder if this gives Google more justification to use their self-driving cars instead of people. With drivers like that I think I'd be more willing to trust a computer.




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