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  (Source: klamtech.com)
However, hardware and software units will be kept separate

Microsoft announced a restructuring plan back in July that would shift the inner workings of the tech company, and now, we're getting a glimpse of the changes that will take place as this plan is carried out thanks to AllThingsD

The new restructuring plan is called "One Microsoft," and the main idea is to bring the Windows Phone, PC and Xbox units closer together for a more seamless experience across multiple devices. This unified approach would make using multiple Microsoft devices easier for users who want a similar experience with details unique to each machine. 

To execute this sort of unification, Microsoft is adjusting executive roles. For starters, Windows and Windows Phone head Terry Myerson will have at least seven direct reports under the new plan. They include leaders for development, test and program-management positions; those heading Microsoft's phone, tablet, PC, Xbox and service departments, and a person in charge of future special projects (such as smart watches).

Other leadership changes include putting Henry Sanders (who had worked with Myerson on Windows Phone) in head of development; having Joe Belfiore (also from the Windows Phone team) lead a group focused on phones, tablets and PCs; putting Marc Whitten in charge of the Xbox team, and allowing Chris Jones to continue heading services.

Some big executives were left out of the list, such as Windows testing head Grant George, Jon DeVaan and Windows services head Antoine Leblond. It's not clear if they will move to other positions in the company or leave quite yet, but their absence from the list of those being repositioned within raises a few red flags. 

While Microsoft is looking to bring device departments together, the company will keep hardware and software units separate. This is a move contradictory to that of Apple, which only recently started pushing software and hardware units together in the development of devices like iPhones and iPads for a more integrated experience. 

Microsoft is in a serious transition period, and many believe that it's much needed. Microsoft has had a difficult time stirring up enthusiasm for Windows Phone against competitors like Apple and Samsung, and the Windows maker was late to the tablet game -- releasing its Surface tablet in October 2012 after the iPad had already been out for over two years.
 
To make matters worse, Microsoft's Surface was initially released with the Windows RT operating system (the full Windows 8 Pro-powered Surface wasn't released until February 2013) and it was a major flop. Many say RT isn't a full Windows 8 experience, lacking the ability to run legacy apps.

While the decision to restructure Microsoft was helped by current CEO Steve Ballmer, it was announced last month that he would be retiring sometime in the next year. While he has said that he planned to retire himself, he's also made other statements that show he wasn't ready to leave so soon -- and that Microsoft's board may be pushing him out as part of the transition period. 

Source: All Things D



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RE: Why?
By XZerg on 9/9/2013 2:09:49 PM , Rating: 2
i seriously hope Microsoft gets his right this time around. Build the underlying on the same technologies and security, and cater to different products and markets by providing interfaces that suit them best. One of the prime reasons Windows commands such a high market today is simply because it unified and standardized the experience. But there is a shift coming due to change in user-interaction interfaces (touch vs mouse/kb, small and portable vs desktop), a shift needs to be done to capture that market but not at the cost of breaking the existing world - contrary to how and why Microsoft became the king of the hill.

i honestly felt that Windows 8 was a great idea at first - a common OS to unify all compute process - alas in reality it was not so and it did the exact opposite, create one more stream/ecosystem. It would have been awesome to be able to run the same applications on any device the users chose to do so without needing a special version for it. It would need the OS/GUI theme handle providing some extra enhancements to suit the device usage better.


"Can anyone tell me what MobileMe is supposed to do?... So why the f*** doesn't it do that?" -- Steve Jobs














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