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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison
Mr. Schmidt points out that the U.S. federal courts have not supported Oracle's Android infringement claims

After a federal court jury ruled that Google Inc.'s (GOOG) Android operating system had not infringed in any major way on Java, a furious Oracle Corp. (ORCL) quickly declined its right to pursue lesser damages on its handful of successful claims, instead pushing for an expedited appeal to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.  Even as that appeal approaches, Oracle has been taking the opportunity to snipe at its legal rival.  CEO and cofounder Larry Ellison in a provocative and wide-ranging interview with CBS Corp. (CBS) television host Charlie Rose blasted Google as "absolutely evil."

I. Eric Schmidt Fires Back

Mr. Ellison's harshly worded accusations of intellectual property theft against Google evoked those of late Apple, Inc. (AAPL) CEO and cofounder Steven P. Jobs, who in his final days remarked:

I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple's $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong. I'm going to destroy Android, because it's a stolen product. I'm willing to go thermonuclear war on this.  I don't want your money. If you offer me $5 billion, I won't want it. I've got plenty of money. I want you to stop using our ideas in Android, that's all I want.

Google is usually silent on such attacks, but on Sunday afternoon former Google CEO and cofounder Eric Schmidt took to his company's Google+ social network to counter Mr. 
Ellison's rant.  He posted:

Eric Schmidt

II. Ellison Has a History of Rants in Losing Legal Battles

Mr. Schmidt shouldn't take Mr. Ellison's attacks too personally, though.  Mr. Ellison -- like Mr. Jobs -- has long looked to use verbal attacks for a variety of purposes from devaluing potential acquisitions to trying to sway public opinion in federal court cases.

Intel Corp. (INTC) and Hewlett-Packard Comp. (HPQ) have also born the wrath of Mr. Ellison in recent years. After dropping support for an HP server line equipped with Intel's Itanium enterprise processors in apparent violation of a contract the companies had, Mr. Ellison frequent voiced vehemence against HP.  At one point he commented, "[HP's servers are] slow, expensive and [with] little or no software."

He called HP's "Superdome" server clusters "turtledome".

Larry Ellison
Oracle has lost cases to both Google and HP related to its 2010 acquisition, Sun Microsystems.  These legal battles have provoked emotion rants from Oracle CEO Larry Ellison.
[Image Source: Getty Images]

But as with Google, his words may just have been sour grapes.  In the end HP triumphed over Oracle, proving in federal court that Oracle had breached its contract.  In the aftermath Oracle eventually gave up, agreeing in September 2012 to continue support for Itanium -- slow servers and all.

A final thing worth noting -- the HP and Google cases are somewhat tied to each other, as both involve Oracle's 2010 acquisition Sun Microsystems, who makes both a rival to Itanium servers (Solaris) and who makes a quasi-open platform (Java) which Google's Android is in part built upon.  In the wake of these losses Mr. Ellison may be more than a little bit frustrated that his $7.4B USD acquisition has failed to pay off amidst these high profile court losses.

Source: Google+



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RE: Ellison is Wrong.
By Etsp on 8/26/2013 3:02:32 PM , Rating: 2
The browser plugin provides an interface for the browser to access the JRE installed on the system. The browser plugin isn't normally the source of the security issues, it's the JRE.

Nothing you have said invalidates the fact that Java "is a security joke." All the security problems that Java has been plagued with have been via the browser plug-in simply because it is much easier for a remote attacker to access the system via the browser.

If you downloaded the infected java application and ran it locally you'd still get infected.


RE: Ellison is Wrong.
By sabarjp on 8/26/2013 4:22:57 PM , Rating: 2
.NET framework and Silverlight have both had dozens of security holes as well, so they aren't any better off. Programs written in C or C++ are just as dangerous, if not more so, as they don't even have a semblance of a sandbox environment.

Java web apps make Java dangerous, not the language. Almost any programming language can be used to wreak havoc, especially since nearly anything can hook into the Win32 API and people turn off UAC and run admin accounts.

The interface between the web and your PC will always be vulnerable, whether it is Java, Silverlight, WebGL, Flash, or your browser. It is all about getting the coveted root access.


RE: Ellison is Wrong.
By Etsp on 8/26/2013 5:45:40 PM , Rating: 2
I don't think Silverlight can be compared to Java applets or to the .NET framework.

A couple of things: How many 0-day .NET exploits have there been? How many Java 0-day exploits? How quickly were they addressed?

The thing is, Java's process for updating is terrible, and .NET's is built into the OS and largely automatic. Not that Java can help that really...

So, to have a relatively secure installation of Java, you need their updater application running. Too bad it's terrible.

Java: Have our updater application running in the background at all times, only actually check on login (unlocking your system doesn't count).

I think the UI for the updater was designed to be annoying as possible. Just a few minutes after logging in, you suddenly get a UAC Prompt. No dialog that pops up that says, "We found an update, would you like to install it?" If I click "Yes", then a UAC prompt is appropriate. That'd be nice. Nope, just a UAC prompt out of nowhere, and some text in the bottom corner of your screen saying, "Java update found"

God forbid if you don't install it into the default directory. It doesn't check where you installed it last time, so you need to change it EVERY TIME.

Then, to top it all off: EVERY TIME YOU UPDATE YOU HAVE TO TELL IT TO NOT INSTALL A BROWSER TOOLBAR.

Oracle is just BEGGING people to not regularly update the Java.


RE: Ellison is Wrong.
By spaced_ on 8/27/2013 12:52:43 PM , Rating: 2
To be honest, I think the real problem with Java is that Oracle owns it.

It's only going to go down the toilet from here.


RE: Ellison is Wrong.
By Ammohunt on 8/28/2013 1:34:35 PM , Rating: 2
Having worked at Oracle i can assure you Java is not a product they can or are willing to flush down the toilet. Oracle is in the process of shedding some of their old world ideas in order to remain competitive. Like any entrenched bureaucracy it will take time for them to adapt.


RE: Ellison is Wrong.
By spaced_ on 8/28/2013 3:51:11 PM , Rating: 2
I hope so. I admire your optimism.

But I don't see much of a future for it. How do Oracle make money out of open source? They start close-sourcing it. I think MySQL and OpenOffice are evidence enough that Oracle will fork Java up somehow.

I can see the sparkles in the Oracle lawyers and business man's eyes when they think about how entrenched it is in the industry. I'm sure they're concocting methods to squeeze some $$$'s out of someone for it.

Like Pantene shampoo, it won't happen overnight but it will happen.


"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -- Isaac Asimov














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