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Roamio DVRs come in three flavors ranging from $200 up to $600

TiVo was one of the early companies to come into the DVR market and the company has announced a new line of DVRs this week promising TV viewers more control over what they watch. The new “Roamio” DVRs allow users to control what they watch on traditional TV channels and over the internet.

"What TiVo is doing here is pressing home their advantage. That is, they know TV," said Colin Dixon, chief analyst at nScreen Media, a research firm in Sunnyvale, Calif. "What they are doing here is actually very difficult for anybody else."

The target audience for the new Roamio DVRs is high-end consumers that pay top dollar for TV and internet video services. The Roamio DVR supports traditional functions expected of the DVR today such as the ability to pause and rewind live TV. However, the set top box also allows users to watch streaming video services like Netflix Hulu.

 
The new DVR also promises easier searches for content across all available viewing options. Users will be able to find shows to watch based on title, actor, director, genre, or keyword.

Some of the new DVR models allow users to be able to watch live and recorded shows on the iPhone or iPad without any other accessories required. TiVo plans an Android app early next year and sometime this fall TiVo will enable out-of-home viewing using the new DVRs over Wi-Fi networks.

The middle of the road Roamio Plus can store 150 hours of HD programming and record up to six channels at once. It features integrated streaming and Wi-Fi support with a price tag around $400. The high-end Roamio Pro can store 450 hours of HD programming and sells for $600. The cheapest of the new DVRs sells for $200 and can store 75 hours of HD video. It's only able to record four channels at a time and lacks the ability to stream video to iPhones or iPads. The base model is able to record over the air broadcasts while the other two versions require cable service.
 
None of the new boxes support satellite services.

Sources: Yahoo! News, TiVo [1], [2]



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RE: 6 Shows?
By ammaross on 8/20/2013 10:49:58 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Last I recall, only one of the satellite providers even offered that many simultanious feeds.


Well, considering "None of the new boxes support satellite services." they're obviously talking about cable TV.

I can full-well see needing at least 3 or 4 channels at a time, as most prime-time shows compete against each other in time slots, and if you want to watch more than one, your DVR has to be able to record more than one at a time. Scale this out to all of your (or TV fanatic's) favorite shows, and you can very likely hit 6 concurrently.


RE: 6 Shows?
By Mitch101 on 8/20/2013 2:23:42 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed 4 is about perfect until we truly get to video on demand and put cable/time slots to rest.

The big one is SPORTS
I want to watch the football game while I dont want to lose any series the wife and I watch as well. The seasons overlap so there are times where you need that third tuner.

HBO and Showtime
HBO and Showtime also are competing in other popular TV series time slots its not just ABC,CBS,NBC,FOX any more even though CBS owns Showtime and I forget who owns HBO. There are some other really good shows on other channels too. Boardwalk Empire, Dexter, Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, American Haunting, etc.


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