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Buses can be charged as they drive

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology has developed a pair of electric buses called Online Electric Vehicles or OLEV. These buses are different from your typical electric vehicles that have to be parked to recharge the batteries. Instead, they can recharge while driving down the road.
 
Electricity is sent to the bus via cables buried in the road with an 85% maximum power transfer efficiency rate (the wireless charging technology is able to supply 60 kHz and 180 kW of power at a stable and constant rate). There is a gap of just under seven inches between the underbody of the electric bus and the road surface. The charging system uses Shaped Magnetic Field in Resonance [PDF] to transfer power to the bus while it’s in motion.

 
The underbody of the bus has a receiving device that is able to convert the magnetic fields into electricity. The power strips needed to power the bus only cover 5 to 15 percent of the road surface, so only small sections of road have to be rebuilt to provide service.

Both of the OLEV buses are currently operating in the city of Gumi, South Korea. As of August 6, the buses are running an intercity route between the Gumi Train Station and In-dong district spanning 15 miles round-trip.
 
The technology used in the OLEV buses is an offshoot of tech used to power trams at an amusement park in South Korea.

Sources: Phys.org, KAIST



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RE: huh
By ClownPuncher on 8/7/2013 5:50:30 PM , Rating: 3
If I was Big Oil, I'd be investing in building Thorium reactors.


RE: huh
By Mint on 8/9/2013 2:08:11 PM , Rating: 2
Something like this is actually likely to happen in Canada:
http://www.terrestrialenergyinc.com/

The founder, David LeBlanc, has made a very good case that molten salt is the big advantage of the ORNL experiments, and sticking with a uranium non-breeding design only adds 0.1c/kWh and needs 1/6th the uranium of today's reactors. Thorium and breeding add regulatory hurdles and reprocessing costs all to solve a problem that is insignificant (uranium supply).

His design is the IMSR, and he partnering with oil sands developers to fund it. They need a cheap heat source with high temperature (which current CANDU/LWR designs can't provide) for steam assisted gravity drainage, which allows extraction of bitumen from the ground.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4brIE0zlKWU

He's trying to simplify it as much as possible: No thorium, no breeding, no reprocessing, and at first, no steam turbine either.


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