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Chad Hurley  (Source: AFR.com)
Hurley believes broadcasters should stop fighting the inevitable change

Chad Hurley, a co-founder of the streaming video site YouTube, believes that viewers should be able to legally watch content from anywhere in the world any time via the web. Hurley mirrors some of the sentiments recently made by a bipartisan inquiry into “outrageous” prices that Australian consumers pay for IT related products and services.

The Australian inquiry suggested that consumers should try to bypass country-based restrictions for cheaper overseas alternatives. Australians have long paid considerably more for technology products and software than other consumers around the world.
 
Hurley says that traditional broadcasters have business models that are crumbling and viewers are increasingly expecting to choose the content they watch on-demand and online. He also believes that online video streaming sites, such as YouTube, will become more aggressive in pursuing the rights to broadcast live sports and other events.
 
"I definitely think we are in a global consumer environment now," said Hurley. "I think the business models are breaking down and the companies that are going to win in this new world are the ones that make it as easy as possible for the consumers to consume the content wherever and whenever they want."

He also believes that media players need to work with online companies in order to create revenue opportunities rather than trying to fight progress.

"At this point maybe they are all continuing to try and lock things down, but I really do believe there is going to be a new service or company that comes along at some point and just starts to remove those barriers and will attract lots of customers all over the world," Hurley added.

Source: AFR



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RE: Right on!
By overlandpark4me on 8/9/2013 1:24:08 PM , Rating: 2
Not true. On a clear low humidity day, I can reach a station outside my viewing area that is 62 miles away. It's a big antenna with a rotor, so I'll take it with the amount of trees in the area. If it's raining I can never get it. If it is clear with high humidity, and windy, I can pull it in, but it drops out frequently and/or I get a lot of artifacts rearing their ugly heads.

Sweet spot seems to be, less than 50 percent humidity, and 10 mph wind or less. it should also be noted that rain takes out my PBS stations from time to time..


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