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This is the total from both tablet launches until June 30

Microsoft has been pretty stingy about revealing sales numbers for its Surface RT and Surface Pro tablets, but the Windows maker finally threw a number out there -- just one. 

From the launch of the Surface RT tablet (October 26, 2012) and the launch of the Surface Pro tablet (February 9, 2013) until the end of the company's fiscal year on June 30, Microsoft said Surface tablet sales came out to a total of $853 million USD. 

Microsoft failed to mention which portion of those sales were Surface RT sales and which were Surface Pros.

In an 8-month period, Microsoft sold 1.7 million Surface tablets -- which doesn't look too good sitting next to Apple's numbers. Last November, Apple sold 3 million iPads in just three days around the holiday shopping period. 

In addition, Apple sold 14.6 million iPads in the last quarter alone, and a total of 57 million iPads since the launch of the Surface RT in October. 


Earlier this month, Microsoft took a $900 million charge on the Surface due to the flop in sales. Microsoft also dropped the price of the Surface RT by $150 USD. 

Last month, Microsoft was basically giving Surface RTs away. It announced that it was giving away 10,000 Surface RT tablets to teachers at the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). The idea was to spread RT adoption in schools by supplying teachers with the devices and even training them how to use it. 

Days later, Microsoft introduced the "Microsoft Surface for education limited time offer," which will give discounted Surface RTs to schools and colleges interested in adopting the tablets.

The offer, which will reportedly run until August 31, 2013, will sell Surface RTs (without keyboards) to schools for only $199. If the schools want a touch keyboard with their Surface RT, the total price is $249. With a type keyboard, the cost is $289. 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, analysts had hoped for earnings of around 75 cents per share ($6.33 billion USD) on revenue of $20.73 billion USD (not including the Surface write-down).  Instead they got earnings of around 66 cents per share ($5.56 billion USD) once the Surface write-down was removed.

Sources: Neowin.net, Loop Insight



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perfect except...
By jeepga on 7/31/2013 3:56:57 PM , Rating: 2
The Surface would be perfect for me if it wasn't for the battery. I cannot reconcile the crappy battery life and the fact it's not serviceable. They fix that I'll buy one.

I plan on buying an RT if they're still around when my daughter is a little older.




RE: perfect except...
By kleinma on 7/31/2013 6:33:47 PM , Rating: 2
No matter what you buy, sadly you are going to need to get over the serviceable part of it. That is just the way the industry is going. About half the smartphones on the market don't have user replaceable batteries, and virtually all tablets. Now its all glue, solder, and adhesive keeping these things together. Planned obsolescence.


RE: perfect except...
By spread on 7/31/2013 11:40:11 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Now its all glue, solder, and adhesive keeping these things together. Planned obsolescence.


No it isn't. It's not planned obsolescence. They are glued together because glue takes less space so the device is thinner. Glue is cheaper and the design can be simpler further saving costs and making devices cheaper, lighter and more space can be used for battery instead of screws and places to thread the screw.

You can't buy cheap stuff and then scream planned obsolescence! You got EXACTLY what you wanted.


"I want people to see my movies in the best formats possible. For [Paramount] to deny people who have Blu-ray sucks!" -- Movie Director Michael Bay














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