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It will be released in the U.S. during Q2 2014

BMW announced today that the electric i3 will go on sale in the U.S. during the second quarter of 2014.

The BMW i3 will have an abundance of features, such as three trim levels (Mega, Giga and Tera). It will also sport a 22-kilowatt, 450-pound lithium ion battery, which will provide power to a rear-mounted electric motor. The i3 packs 170 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque, allowing the single-gear i3 to accelerate from 0-30 miles per hour in 3.5 seconds and 0-60 mph in about 7.0 seconds. However, its top speed is 93 MPH. 


The i3 has an electric range of 80-100 miles, and the battery can be charged with a standard system in about three hours. For those who need faster charging, there's the SAE DC Combo Fast Charger for a full charge in only 30 minutes. An optional 34-hp, 650cc two-cylinder generator can be added for additional range. 

The EV will also offer its LifeDrive architecture, which is the overall design of the vehicle through the Life Module and the Drive Module. The Life Module is the first mass-produced monocoque made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and it's 30 percent lighter than aluminum for an overall weight of 2,700 pounds. The Drive Module, on the other hand, is an aluminum chassis placed under the Life Module, and it contains parts like the battery. 


"The new all-electric BMW i3 is a landmark in BMW's mission to provide a completely sustainable, electric vehicle that still stays true to the Ultimate Driving Machine moniker," said BMW. "The BMW i3 is the first product of the new BMW i sub-brand, and is a truly purpose built electric car. It's a new era for electro mobility at BMW."

The i3 will have a price tag of $41,350 when released in the U.S. during Q2 2014. 

Source: BMW



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RE: huh?
By Argon18 on 7/29/2013 3:55:52 PM , Rating: 0
ProTip: People in the other 49 states buy electric cars too. Nice try to you. Enjoy your nuclear waste, or whatever it is you use.

And it still isn't sustainable. 490 lbs of lithium ion battery pack in each car? Ever been to a lithium strip mine? I doubt it. Lets just say that it's "less than friendly" to the environment.


RE: huh?
By SublimeSimplicity on 7/29/2013 4:09:08 PM , Rating: 3
Less than 1% of the battery by weight is Lithium.


RE: huh?
By wiz220 on 7/29/2013 5:27:07 PM , Rating: 2
At some point the grid will run on things other than coal, or any other fossil fuel for that matter. The cars are agnostic as to how the electricity they use is produced. Who knows what will power the grid in the future, but we do know that oil, and fossil fuels in general, will run out at some point. The future of the grid most likely lays in many forms of renewables like wind, solar, tidal, geothermal, maybe even nuclear fusion so at that point the car's power will be clean. Better to get our vehicle fleet off of oil ASAP to make the transition that much easier.


RE: huh?
By StormyKnight on 7/29/2013 11:55:08 PM , Rating: 2
Yes, I'm sure there will be. Then you can kiss your weekend drive into the country for the sights. The blue skies, trees and lakes will be blocked by mammoth wind turbines and solar collecting fields. Oh joy!!


RE: huh?
By Spuke on 7/30/2013 1:34:05 AM , Rating: 2
I'm sure there will be areas where the residents won't allow these things to be built much like nuclear powerplants are blocked now.


RE: huh?
By BRB29 on 7/30/2013 8:25:07 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Yes, I'm sure there will be. Then you can kiss your weekend drive into the country for the sights. The blue skies, trees and lakes will be blocked by mammoth wind turbines and solar collecting fields. Oh joy!!


No. If we have to kiss our weekend drive into the country for sights good bye, then it's most likely because of population growth. That will never happen as the earth can only sustain so many humans since we create so much waste and pollution. Before that even happen, humans will probably kill themselves through endless wars or enforce a world wide population control policy.

It's clear that everyone is looking at nuclear fusion for the future. Stop imagining some BS world covered with wind turbines and solar panels. We don't even have the resources to do that. This is the real world, not Final Fantasy


RE: huh?
By Spuke on 7/30/2013 12:42:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's clear that everyone is looking at nuclear fusion for the future.
Except the environmentalists that attempt to block every single nuclear plant with endless lawsuits. Also, you must not get out often (most city folks don't despite their claims to be "worldly") as wind farms are ALREADY "polluting" formerly beautiful views.


RE: huh?
By Reclaimer77 on 7/30/2013 12:53:58 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
No. If we have to kiss our weekend drive into the country for sights good bye, then it's most likely because of population growth. That will never happen as the earth can only sustain so many humans since we create so much waste and pollution. Before that even happen, humans will probably kill themselves through endless wars or enforce a world wide population control policy.


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


Liberal alert!!!


RE: huh?
By Cheesew1z69 on 7/30/2013 3:34:49 PM , Rating: 2
More like a retard alert....


RE: huh?
By johnsmith9875 on 7/29/2013 6:24:17 PM , Rating: 2
Lithium is recyclable


RE: huh?
By Keeir on 7/29/2013 10:11:24 PM , Rating: 2
Friend, I think you don't really understand what your talking about...

Most states use relatively minor amount of coal. In the last 12 months, only 38% of ALL US electricity was generated by coal.

If you power an electric car off the US grid as an average, there is not a less poluting or less CO2 producing car. If you stick 3-4 people in one, you reach modern bus/train efficieny.

For Lithium. Typically it takes around ~3 lbs of Lithium Carbonate to refine enough likely for a 1 kWh Lithium Cobalt battery. Assuming this ratio is common/similiar to others, a 15 kWh battery (perfectly fine with a range extender) means you need... 45 lbs of Lithium Carbonate. (As a side note, Lithium Carbonate costs less than 1/lb right now. So in a Tesla Model S, you get around 300 dollars of lithium)

Lithium is not "strip" mined. Lithium disolves in water. The typical method today is to find a place that is hot and dry. Pump water in the ground and dry it out in pools.

Oh course, we could always just refine it out of Sea Water for around 2.50-5.00/lb. I think adding an additional 750 dollars to the cost of a 90,000 EV would be hardly noticable.

Or, best yet, a better type of battery is discovered. Zinc-Air for instance would work well in a 100% battery swap type system. Lithium is just the first that offers the power, recharging efficieny, and kWh/kg to make a car feasable.


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer

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