backtop


Print 38 comment(s) - last by BillyBatson.. on Jul 26 at 6:01 PM

Official debut will be July 29

BMW has announced the official pricing for its first electric vehicle. The BMW i3 will have a starting price $41,350 in the U.S. That makes BMWs little electric car nearly 30% more expensive than a base 3-Series sedan. However, this news shouldn’t come as a shock since BMW hinted in May that the price of the vehicle would be around $40,000.

The starting price for the i3 in Germany will be €34,950, which works out to about $46,000. The car will be available in Germany starting in November, with U.S. availability early next year. The official debut for the i3 will be on July 29 at events held simultaneously in New York, London, and Beijing.

Bloomberg reports that BMW has invested $600 million in production facilities for the electric car. Among the facilities built specifically for this car are new factory in Washington State to make carbon fiber for the vehicle's passenger cell.
 
BMW also plans an interesting method of selling the electric vehicle. The automaker plans to sell the car on the internet, via sales people that visit customers at their homes, and through some select BMW dealers.


BMW i3 Prototype

The people at Autoblog recently drove the 2014 i3 for the first time at an autocross event in Germany. It appears that this will be a different sort of driving pleasure than most BMW enthusiasts are used to, with complaints of lots of body roll. The little car uses a 168 hp electric motor (184 lb-ft of torque) combined with a 22 kWh lithium-ion battery pack, and BMW promises 124 miles per charge when driven in Eco Pro+ plus mode.

One complaint Autoblog had about the vehicle is that when closing the front doors the structure the vehicle sounded plastic-like and cheap, whereas BMWs are known for being premium automobiles.

Sources: Business Week, Autoblog



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Here's what none of you are understanding
By flyingpants1 on 7/23/2013 6:34:53 AM , Rating: 2
Here's what you're all misunderstanding about the look of the BMW i3. It's attempting the perfect vehicle body from a weight, materials cost and efficiency point of view, especially important for an EV.

This is blatantly obvious if you look at the i3 from the side. BMW simply took a normal sedan and cut off everything in front of the front wheels (no need for a front engine compartment), and everything behind the rear wheels (no need for a gas tank or huge trunk - small hatchback design). No need for superfluous materials or weight. This is probably the lightest they could make it. Oh, plus it's made of plastic and carbon fiber.

It looks like one of those concept designs that never made it. Head-turner for sure. Some people just like to talk trash, but if you saw one in person (especially in that color) your eyes would be locked.

I think it's ugly too by today's standards, but I'm willing to look past fashion for the sheer brilliance of the design. I know most of you are over 40 and very set in your ways due to an aging brain, but give this i3 a chance.

The range extender thing comes down to the implementation. If it really only costs $2,000 and I can recharge my car constantly while driving, the sun may be setting early on Tesla.




By Monkey's Uncle on 7/23/2013 10:05:27 AM , Rating: 2
One thing they forgot in this perfect vehicle body. Aerodynamics.

Sure if the thing won't go faster than about 40 MPH, they wouldn't have to worry about that. But as anyone who has ridden a motorcycle on the highway knows, wind resistance at highway speeds (60 MPH+) can push on you/your vehicle pretty damn hard.

If you want to take this misshapen lump of metal/plastic to highways speeds, aerodynamic drag will require twice the power to overcome than a vehicle that can slice through the air with half the drag. That directly relates to battery range. Even their piddly excuse for an 'extender' won't help that.

I am shocked that someone with BMW's performance background would even design something this backward. It is just not like them.


By flyingpants1 on 7/23/2013 12:39:32 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed about the aerodynamics. That's the one flaw and it's a pretty big one..


"We can't expect users to use common sense. That would eliminate the need for all sorts of legislation, committees, oversight and lawyers." -- Christopher Jennings

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki