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11.6-inch, $249 USD laptop is drawing rave reviews

The top selling notebook on Amazon.com, Inc. (AMZN) currently is... a Google Inc. (GOOG) Chromebook?!

This news may come as a shock to many, but the Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. $249 USD Wi-Fi model Chromebook seized that crown recently, placing #3 in overall PC sales on Amazon.  The $310 USD 3G-equipped model settled for a respectable #19 place in notebooks.

The only "PC" that's currently outselling the (Linux) Chrome OS based Samsung laptop on Amazon is the 7-inch $170 USD Galaxy Tab 2.

Amazon sales aren't everything, but Chromebooks are clearly rising fast and appear dangerous.  According to Gartner, Inc. (IT) they accounted for nearly 5 percent of PC sales last quarter (1 in every 20 PCs sold).  Moreover, they comprised roughly 25 percent of sub-$300 USD notebook sales.
Samsung Chromebook
That's a shocking comeback for an operating system that appeared all but dead after abysmal sales half in H2 2011.  The key appears to be what drew excitement to Chromebooks in the first place -- prices.

Prices were originally expected to be in the $200-300 USD range, when Chrome OS was first announced way back in Nov. '09, but when it finally landed in May '11 they slotted in at $350-500 USD.  Samsung refused to release sales on its original Chromebook priced at $430 (Wi-Fi); $500 (3G), but it was rumored to be in the tens of thousands of units.

By contrast, after cutting its price nearly in half, Samsung is moving millions of Chromebooks.  Aside from the price, another key to the Chromebook resurgence is a tweaked operating system user interface, which Google has devoted a lot of TLC to, even when Chromebooks weren't selling.

For its price the 11.6-inch Wi-Fi model includes impressive specs:
  • 1366x768 11.6-inch display
  • 2 GB DDR3 (1333 MHz)
  • 1.7 GHz dual-core Samsung Exynos 5250
  • 16 GB NAND Flash hard drive
  • Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • USB 2.0
  • USB 3.0
  • Weight: 2.4 lb
  • Dimensions: 11.40 x 8.09 x 0.69 inches
Is Chrome OS the next Android?  It's too early to say, but it's enjoying a similar meteoric rise in sales after a slow start much like Android did.  For Google, it appears patience and devotion to its craft is yet again paying off.

Source: Amazon



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RE: This is how
By Samus on 7/18/2013 2:39:58 PM , Rating: 2
Every Apple product essentially runs Linux, with OSX being kernel compatible (application recompilation required.)

That's why I'm surprised there aren't as many programs for Mac...but I guess it comes down to there just aren't many programs for Linux.


RE: This is how
By Luticus on 7/18/2013 2:55:32 PM , Rating: 2
There are lots of programs for mac just as there are countless programs for Linux distributions. OSX is no more Linux than Android is. To say Android is Linux is a huge stretch. It's Linux "like", but it lacks several things that today's "GNU/Linux" distributions have. Android is based on Linux just like OSX is based on FreeBSD, this does not mean that Android IS Linux, just as Ubuntu is not Debian.

To further stress this: "Android consists of a kernel based on Linux kernel version 2.6 and, from Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich onwards, version 3.x", "Android's Linux kernel has further architecture changes by Google outside the typical Linux kernel development cycle.[63] Android does not have a native X Window System by default nor does it support the full set of standard GNU libraries, and this makes it difficult to port existing Linux applications or libraries to Android." Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_%28operating_...


RE: This is how
By nafhan on 7/18/2013 4:40:46 PM , Rating: 2
The reason Android apps are generally not compatible with other Linux based systems is because most Android apps are written for the Dalvik VM. Dalvik is essentially a JVM like layer that runs on top of Android. The fact that Android does not include various unnecessary (for Android) OS utilities has nothing to do with whether or not it's Linux.


RE: This is how
By nafhan on 7/18/2013 4:10:58 PM , Rating: 3
Every Apple product runs a BSD derived kernel that's POSIX compliant. Linux kernel based OS's are mostly compliant. There's some level of interoperability between most POSIX compliant systems, but that's nothing like "essentially running Linux".
quote:
That's why I'm surprised there aren't as many programs for Mac...but I guess it comes down to there just aren't many programs for Linux.
I think it's more likely that you want a specific program you are used to using in Windows and can't find it on OS X or Linux.


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