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  (Source: Techcetera)
Shakeup will consolidate previously separate units, reportedly

A report by Bloomberg cites sources at Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) as saying that Chief Executive Steve Ballmer's leadership change will start be consolidating all of Microsoft's hardware products -- including Surface and Xbox -- under a single new unit, which would be headed by Windows chief Julie Larson-Green.

The Xbox unit (formally the interactive entertainment division) had been left leaderless after Don Mattrick, its former chief, jumped ship to become CEO of Zynga Inc. (ZNGA).  Some reports suggested Mr. Mattrick was fired for making comments about digital rights management (DRM) and the Xbox One.  In an interview Mr. Mattrick had told gamers who didn't have 100 percent reliable internet to not buy an Xbox One, a suggestion many disgruntled gamers took to heart.  Microsoft eventually backed down from that policy.

Microsoft's CIO Tony Scott also recently bailed, prior to the upcoming shakeup.

It is unclear whether Mr. Ballmer would then appoint a new Windows President, or if Ms. Larson-Green would fill both slots.  One source says that Terry Myerson -- the current Windows Phone chief -- will likely be put in charge of all operating system development, including desktop Windows.  That move would likely mean a continuation of Microsoft's "Metro" (aka Modern UI) assault on the desktop/laptop market, much to the chagrin of critics of that design direction.

Terry Myerson
Windows Phone chief Terry Myerson will report lead all OS development at Microsoft.
[Image Source: Reuters]

Marketing for various units (Windows, server, hardware, etc.) would also be consolidated into a single unit, which would be headed by Tami Reller, who currently is marketing chief for just the Windows unit.  Another shift from a financial perspective would be that the chief financial officers (CFOs) of the new units would report directly to company CFO -- Amy Hood -- versus the current situation the CFOs the present units report to their unit chief.

Julie Larson-Green
Julie Larson-Green will reportedly manage all Microsoft HW development. [Image Source: AP]

A final new unit would be tasked with managing acquired/merged-in businesses and with wooing developers.  That unit will be headed by Skype president Tony Bates.

Sources say the exact roles are still being finalized and may be shuffled before an official announcement comes.  Overall the changes are designed to reposition Microsoft as a "devices and services" firm, Microsoft's long term vision.  The shift towards first party hardware and cloud services would make Microsoft look a lot more like Apple, Inc. (AAPL), a radical shift for a company that started off with a narrow focus on software.

Source: Bloomberg



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RE: the hate here
By althaz on 7/3/2013 10:00:48 PM , Rating: 2
Care to elaborate on how Win7 isn't worse than Win8 on the desktop?

You don't think improvements to libraries, cloud backup and significant speed improvements are worth having? You don't like the "Up" button in File Explorer? Or is it the improvements to multi-monitor support you don't like? Maybe you hate the improved class drivers? Or perhaps the storage pool options seem like a waste of time to you? Does the dramatically improved start-up speed rub you the wrong way, or is it instead the new backup features that don't sit well with you?

The only other difference to the desktop experience is a vastly improved app-launcher which allows the use of muscle-memory to launch apps, as well as the traditional search-based option (you do lose the completely useless, slow and antiquated hierarchical menu, but that is actually a very good thing).


RE: the hate here
By StevoLincolnite on 7/3/2013 10:36:02 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
significant speed improvements are worth having?


The speed improvements aren't noticeable on a decently equipped PC.
I'm running a Core i7 3930K @ 4.8ghz, 32Gb of ram and a couple of SSD's in Raid 0, I noticed zero difference, but that's to be expected.

However, throw Windows 8 on a Netbook or low-end Laptop with a slow 5400rpm HDD and the difference becomes more pronounced.

Personally, I went back to Windows 7, Windows 8 isn't for me.


RE: the hate here
By althaz on 7/3/2013 11:25:51 PM , Rating: 2
I'm running a similarly specced PC (4.5Ghz Ivy Bridge, 16Gb RAM, 240Gb Intel 520 SSD) and the performance difference is definitely noticable to me.

Of course the difference is more pronounced the crapier your hardware, but if you didn't notice any improvements, I suspect it's because you didn't spend much time switching back and forth (I had a near identical machine that felt a bit sluggish by comparison under Win7) or you used the Previews (all of which ran like crap compared to RTM).


RE: the hate here
By Reclaimer77 on 7/3/2013 11:30:37 PM , Rating: 2
lol I love how he brings up these under the hood changes while we have the huge gnarled cock of Metro beating us over the head...


RE: the hate here
By althaz on 7/4/2013 12:01:50 AM , Rating: 4
I love how I listed virtually every change to the desktop experience in Win8 and you failed to point out anything bad with any of them.

Metro is an optional extra with Win8. If you don't like Metro apps, don't use them (I don't).

If you mean the start screen, I'm yet to hear a compelling argument for it not being a MASSIVE improvement on the positivly antique start menu - which was vitually useless as an app launcher. If for some reason you hate change, the start menu can be brought back in Windows 8 with any of several apps (most of them free).


RE: the hate here
By Reclaimer77 on 7/4/2013 1:28:17 AM , Rating: 1
Nothing is "bad" about those changes at all. They don't have to be "bad" for my argument to have merit.

They just aren't good ENOUGH to warrant switching to Windows 8.

As far as your "app launcher" nonsense, my goodness. A desktop PC isn't a mobile device. I sure as hell don't need a full screen "environment" to take over my desktop in Windows 7 just to run programs.

quote:
I'm yet to hear a compelling argument for it not being a MASSIVE improvement on the positivly antique start menu


Then you either haven't been listening, or have just dismissed these arguments out of hand. I'm getting really tired of people like you claiming "nobody" has made good arguments, when there's an entire Internet full of them out there. Just because you don't agree, doesn't mean they are not compelling.


RE: the hate here
By djcameron on 7/4/2013 1:57:20 AM , Rating: 2
I don't really like the metro apps, so I don't use them. However, after about a week learning the new interface and keyboard commands, I'm far more productive with Windows 8.


RE: the hate here
By mackx on 7/4/2013 2:36:14 AM , Rating: 2
the point is in the end we decide how much use these features are to us based on our own usage of our PCs

i hardly ever reboot so the boot up time is not a feature to me.
i despise the start screen
i dont use metro apps and removed the folder
i find it worse in multi screen use
i find that i cant right click on a folder anymore and hit 'r' to bring up properties. i can't click file and hit n to create a new folder anymore.

changes that don't benefit me in anyway. takes more clicks to do what i wanted to do in the 1st place. there's more but i can't remember them

the only benefit in win8 for me is the performance tab in task manager (cancelled out that to end a process tree takes more clicks now) and the fact i can pause a copy/move.

microsofts AV is less integrated oddly since i can't right click on a folder and scan - no context menu addin. it doesn't auto update like the old one. i have to run windows update manually to install it.

etc etc etc.

you may like it, a lot of us don't.


RE: the hate here
By bigboxes on 7/4/2013 8:13:51 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed. I reboot about once a month. Other than that, my pc stays on all the time, as does my file server. There's absolutely no reason to put Win8 on any of my PCs. It's just like WinME. As soon as I tried it out I was like "Oh crap! Can I get this thing off and get things back to the way they were??" Microsoft just seems doomed to repeat its mistakes.


RE: the hate here
By althaz on 7/4/2013 7:57:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
i find it worse in multi screen use

This actually doesn't make sense, everything to do with multi-screen displays is worse, unless you don't like the new default options (which are configurable).

quote:
i find that i cant right click on a folder anymore and hit 'r' to bring up properties.

This still works...you obviously haven't tried it.

quote:
i can't click file and hit n to create a new folder anymore.

This doesn't work in Windows 7 either...I know because I'm on Win7 right now and I just tried it.


RE: the hate here
By althaz on 7/4/2013 8:21:39 PM , Rating: 2
lol, I wrote "worse", but I obviously meant "better". Damn you DailyTech, still no edit function?


RE: the hate here
By althaz on 7/4/2013 7:57:30 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
i find it worse in multi screen use

This actually doesn't make sense, everything to do with multi-screen displays is worse, unless you don't like the new default options (which are configurable).

quote:
i find that i cant right click on a folder anymore and hit 'r' to bring up properties.

This still works...you obviously haven't tried it.

quote:
i can't click file and hit n to create a new folder anymore.

This doesn't work in Windows 7 either...I know because I'm on Win7 right now and I just tried it.


RE: the hate here
By LazLong on 7/4/2013 9:54:37 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
by althaz on July 4, 2013 at 12:01 AM

Metro is an optional extra with Win8. If you don't like Metro apps, don't use them (I don't).


How is Metro an optional extra? It's where you get dumped when you log in. And don't get me started on the Metro Start Screen. Gone is a hierarchical structure. All of the app shortcuts get dumped all over it like a file manager with explosive diarrhea.

I may be an 'oldfag' 'cause I started my computer use on a ][+, but I've had experience using several different CLI- and GUI-based interfaces. This isn't the first time I've had to learn a new interface paradigm. But 8's half-baked, neither here nor there abortion of an interface is the worst piece of shit I can ever recall using. Releasing something that is so radical of a change, without having all of the OS apps moved to it was a very big mistake. Inconsistency is the only constant, and users are totally lost when put in front of an 8 desktop. Computer enthusiasts may be willing to stumble around trying to figure out how to use this pile of dung, but most people just want to get stuff done with a minimal amount of hoops to jump through between them and the completion of their task.


"Well, there may be a reason why they call them 'Mac' trucks! Windows machines will not be trucks." -- Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer














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