backtop


Print 17 comment(s) - last by Mona1980.. on Jul 27 at 12:29 AM


  (Source: penrosestfrancisblog.org)
It leaves the rest of the immune system alone, though

Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong disease, but researchers at Stanford University are hoping to eliminate the effects of the disease -- and eventually cure it -- with a new vaccine.

Researchers from the Stanford School of Medicine -- led by Lawrence Steinman, MD, professor of pediatrics and of neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford -- have created a DNA vaccine that fights type 1 diabetes by targeting only a certain population of cells in the immune system without destroying the whole thing.

The vaccine consists of an altered piece of DNA, which holds the proinsulin gene. Beta cells, which are the only cells that make insulin in the body, start out as proinsulin precursor proteins. The beta cells, like all cells, display small pieces of the proteins they make on their surfaces called peptides, and the proinsulin peptides on the surface of beta cells cause misdirected CD8 cells (which are immune cells that patrol the cell surfaces for foreign peptides) to attack the beta cells. 

The new DNA vaccine seeks out CD8 cells only targeting proinsulin; not all CD8 cells. If the vaccine had shut down the normal behavior of all CD8 cells, it would interfere with the patient's immune system and stop their bodies from being able to fight off infections and serious issues like cancer. Hence, shutting the whole system down isn't a better option.

That's why the vaccine only targets proinsulin-attacking CD8 cells and stops them from destroying beta cells while leaving everything else alone. 

To test the vaccine, the research team recruited 80 type 1 diabetic patients that required insulin therapy. They divided the patients into five different groups, where four received different doses of the vaccine and one received a placebo. 

Over the course of 12 weeks, the researchers measured levels of C-peptide in the patients, which is a piece of proinsulin that is cut off when insulin is pulled out of the proinsulin molecule. C-peptide is thought to fight off diabetic complications, such as eye and kidney damage. 

The team checked the C-peptide levels before they began, then at five and 15 weeks, and then six, nine, 12, 18 and 24 months after starting on the vaccination. During these checks, blood was drawn 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after patients drank a modified milkshake.

According to results, levels of proinsulin-targeting CD8 cells were significantly depleted in patients who received the vaccine, compared with those getting placebo. However, other CD8 cells remained intact and left alone. Patients on the vaccine either had the same C-peptide levels or even increased levels, which would help them fight off diabetic complications later in life. 

Source: Stanford Medicine



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: wow
By 4745454b on 7/2/2013 9:54:34 AM , Rating: 2
But will it? Will the beta cells regen? I haven't heard anything about their regen ability. It's great if it will happen, and perhaps it could be gave to kids before they come down with it. But seeing as it hasn't been proved to be genetic you'd have to give it to all of them? Or at least those who's parents worry about this.


RE: wow
By betamax69 on 7/2/2013 8:44:27 PM , Rating: 2
Actually, they will. It's trivial to stimulate the beta cells to regrow. Taking an OTC stomach aide called Prevacid will cause other cells in your pancreas that haven't been killed to differentiate into beta cells. It's also hypothesized that not all of them even die.

The tricky part is stopping the body from killing _those_.


"Folks that want porn can buy an Android phone." -- Steve Jobs














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki