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Microsoft is learning to emulate Android

A report from market research firm Interactive Data Corp. (IDC) last month gave some surprising news -- "Windows Phone posted the largest year-over-year gain among the leading operating systems, more than doubling its size from a year ago."

Led by Finnish phonemaker Nokia Oyj. (HEX:NOK1V) -- once the world's largest smartphone maker and currently the company behind roughly four out of every five Windows Phones shipped -- Windows Phone shipped 7.0m units in Q1 2013 for a 3.2 percent market share; slightly ahead of BlackBerry Ltd.'s (TSE:BB) 6.3m units shipped (and 2.9 percent market share).  Google Inc.'s (GOOG) Android widened its lead for the quarter, outselling Apple, Inc. (AAPL) more than 4-to-1, with a 79 percent market share.

Microsoft Corp.'s (MSFT) Windows Phone product manager Larry Lieberman gave an interview to The Verge this week cheering the third place "victory".  He comments, "We think we're solidly the third ecosystem right now.  That's a huge announcement in some respects.  [Windows Phone is] growing faster than anyone else right now."

The news must be bitter for BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins who has long stated that his ambition for his firm is to capture third place in the mobile market.

As for the Windows Phone product chief, he's dismissive of BlackBerry, commenting, "I don't think they can bring to the table some of the things we have.  The fact like we're delivering across such a different set of price points to such a large audience."
After initially pledging to follow in Apple's line with Windows Phone, it now appears that Microsoft is aiming to emulate Google, whose OS is on three out of every four smartphones sold today.  Microsoft and Nokia are hoping that sales of budget handsets will help to drive Windows Phone up a similar path of meteoric growth to Android.

Mr. Lieberman says that Microsoft continues its efforts to woo developers via a growing user base and easy to use APIs.  He did not comment on the lack of a Windows Phone 8.1 preview at Microsoft's annual BUILD Conference, which wraps up tomorrow.  He did hint at one possible feature, though, confirming that a notification center is the feature that is most often request in user feedback messages to Microsoft.

Ultimately Microsoft's decision not to tip its hand too early with WP8.1 may be a wise decision -- after all, early publication of Windows Phone 8 details depressed Windows Phone 7.5 sales last year.  By contrast Apple and Google tend to announce new OS releases just befor they hit the market, to avoid a sales slowdown.

Source: The Verge



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RE: LOL!
By Nutzo on 6/27/2013 1:37:24 PM , Rating: 4
You can laugh, but at least Microsoft gained market share.
They actually had the largest percentage of gain,
2.7% to 3.0% is an increase in sales of 11%

Android increase thier sales by 8%

The bigger story is that Apple sales dropped 20%, and Blackberry dropped 12%

As far as overall market share, Android grew even more than Apple dropped, 6.1% vs 4.6, and Blackberry dropped more than Microsoft gained, .4% vs .3%


RE: LOL!
By LRonaldHubbs on 6/27/2013 2:03:36 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
They actually had the largest percentage of gain,
2.7% to 3.0% is an increase in sales of 11%


http://xkcd.com/1102/


RE: LOL!
By ClownPuncher on 6/27/13, Rating: 0
RE: LOL!
By Mitch101 on 6/27/2013 7:31:21 PM , Rating: 3
I love how he used comScore numbers which are only for the U.S. and before Verizon started selling the Windows phone Nokia 925 instead of using the Kantar Worldpanel ComTech numbers which are for the entire world. Is someones trying to get a job in Apples marketing group?

Among people who bought a Windows Phone in the last year, 23 percent jumped ship from Android, while 25 percent upgraded from another Windows Phone and 42 percent moved up from a feature phone.

Only going to accelerate more after July 11th when Nokia drops the 41 megapixel EOS Bomb on everyone.

Windows Phone grew in the US to 5.6% and is in double digits in several parts of the world now.

The latest Kantar Worldpanel ComTech figures show Windows Phone with an 8.4% market share in the U.K., a 6.4% market share in Germany , a 10.5% market share in Italy, and a 6.2% market share in France.

Canalys concludes that by 2017, Windows Phone will nearly overtake the iPhone in market share. Ill wager it will happen in 2015.


RE: LOL!
By Moto7451 on 6/28/2013 2:11:16 AM , Rating: 3
There's an XKCD for that:

http://www.xkcd.com/1007/


RE: LOL!
By Moto7451 on 6/28/2013 2:12:35 AM , Rating: 2
RE: LOL!
By Mitch101 on 6/28/2013 7:23:47 AM , Rating: 3
I never found that comic strip funny once in a rare occasion its ok but 99% of the time its meh like reading Charlie Brown.


RE: LOL!
By ClownPuncher on 6/28/2013 10:54:57 AM , Rating: 2
You're meh.


RE: LOL!
By millerm277 on 6/28/2013 5:20:14 PM , Rating: 3
It's not really a "funny" comic. It's sometimes/somewhat humorous, but it's more aimed at being "interesting", IMO.

Many people find it to be an excellent comic (as evidenced by the popularity), but I don't think most people would call it the funniest comic ever.


RE: LOL!
By Wererat on 6/28/2013 1:48:38 PM , Rating: 2
In the important battle for developer time, being 3rd and growing definitely means "not a waste of time to code for this."

Actually, the relative newness of WP means a startup might have an easier time writing a breakthrough app. In iOS and Android, it may be a bit challenging standing out from all the chaff games and apps.


RE: LOL!
By BabelHuber on 6/27/2013 3:47:23 PM , Rating: 1
Funny. But this does not change the fact that iOS and Android sold almost 200 Million smartphones combined in just one quarter, while Microsoft sold about 6 Million.

It would not even matter if MS would have sold 7 Million instead. Android's sales in one quarter are bigger than the whole WP customer base.

Hence there is only a little customer base to develop Apps for. For App developers, iOS and Android are much more attractive.


RE: LOL!
By arazok on 6/27/2013 4:51:43 PM , Rating: 2
A little context is in order here.

MS still has a puny market share, but the OS has only existed for 6 months. Win 7 phones were never really in the game in consumers’ minds, so Win 8 is arguably their first real smartphone entry.

You can’t realistically expect them to sell 100M units right out of the gate. They only brought the budget phones into the market 2 months ago. It takes time to get the product out and build market share.

To go from 2% to 6% market share in 6 months is pretty good. Momentum matters, and right now they have it.

People are followers, and most consumers won’t try something unless they see others using it. My wife and I both got a Win 8 phone, and I know two people who have now purchased one solely because we had good things to say about it. From those two, other sales may follow. Once MS hits 10% market share, the snowball effect will be powerful and you’ll see this leap into a much stronger 3rd place.

Give it another year, and you’re going to see this thing really get traction.


RE: LOL!
By Reclaimer77 on 6/27/13, Rating: 0
RE: LOL!
By kleinma on 6/27/2013 5:33:22 PM , Rating: 2
Win7 and Win8 phone while they might look similar with live tiles, are totally different systems. Win8 Phone uses a shared kernel with Windows 8. That has significant implications.

I remember when people were talking about how crappy android was and how iPhone was the new forever king of mobile, and how its market share dominated everything. I also remember when IE had 98% market share in the browser market.

If you think something is "not in the game" because there are others who thoroughly dominate a given market segment at the moment, then all I can say is wait a minute.


RE: LOL!
By Reclaimer77 on 6/27/2013 10:14:28 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
If you think something is "not in the game" because there are others who thoroughly dominate a given market segment at the moment, then all I can say is wait a minute.


No that's not what I'm basing my viewpoint on. I'm basing my statements on the obvious plain-as-day observation of Microsoft's strategy with Windows Phone. Which has been quite lackluster and at times baffling.

Did you know Microsoft has listed July 2014 for when it will end support for Windows Phone 8. Already? Meaning if I bought a Windows Phone today it's basically guaranteed to be worthless before my contract is even up. Hooray!

Sure you can bring up Android "fragmentation", and that's valid. But waiting longer for an OS update is bit different than being left out of an entirely new OS altogether. You would think Microsoft would have learned from what happened when people bought WP7.5 devices only to learn they were completely obsolete as soon as WP8 launched!

Microsoft actually has years more experience than most mobile players. Yet Windows Phone 7 was lacking features so basic, it was hard to imagine a company like Microsoft, combined with years of a head-start in the smartphone OS market, could have missed them.

The lack of apps was obvious in Windows Phone 7 – and there hasn’t been any progress in WP8. Google recently declared that it would NOT be developing apps for the Windows Phone platform as it did not see any consumer demand. I can't stress enough what a massive blow that is. You can’t come up with an alternative to that. iOS has Google Apps, Android has Google Apps. But WP8 doesn’t. It’s doomed.

Honestly I don't see what you people are looking at. Is Windows Phone growing? Sure. Because the entire smartphone market is still growing (believe it or not, not everyone in the world owns one). But to just ignore so many troubling aspects to the Windows Phone ecosystem and say everything will work out, is just insane to me!


RE: LOL!
By themaster08 on 6/28/2013 2:32:40 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Did you know Microsoft has listed July 2014 for when it will end support for Windows Phone 8. Already? Meaning if I bought a Windows Phone today it's basically guaranteed to be worthless before my contract is even up. Hooray!

That's not what it means at all. Way to misconstrue the point.

This is similar to, for example, Google saying they are ceasing support for Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Many devices can still be updated from Ice Cream Sandwich which means they will still be supported.

Current Windows Phones that are updated in the future will still be supported. Those that are not updated in the future (possibly due to hardware constraints) won't be.

quote:
The lack of apps was obvious in Windows Phone 7 – and there hasn’t been any progress in WP8. Google recently declared that it would NOT be developing apps for the Windows Phone platform as it did not see any consumer demand.
Google wouldn't even allow Microsoft access to the APIs to develop a Windows Phone Youtube app until recently. Microsoft actually developed a very good Windows Phone Youtube app very recently, which actually had no ads. This went against Google's terms and conditions and Google filed a complaint, however Microsoft's argument was that Google was not allowing Microsoft access to the APIs to allow ads in their app.

Eventually Google gave in and provided Microsoft access to the APIs, because they knew that if this went in front of a judge, they would be thrown out.

Google is always trying to find ways of preventing Microsoft from progressing with Windows Phone, so it's no surprise that they're not developing any apps for the platform.

Besides, the options we have available on Windows Phone are better (in my opinion) than Google's apps anyway, except for search.


RE: LOL!
By Reclaimer77 on 6/30/2013 11:20:58 AM , Rating: 2
Okay my friend, there is a lot wrong here with your logic.

First off Google makes it's money from ad revenue generated by people using it's services. Google doesn't make it's money from smartphones sales directly. Google doesn't lose profit if someone uses Gmail on a Windows Phone as apposed to Android.

So when you make statements like:

quote:
Google is always trying to find ways of preventing Microsoft from progressing with Windows Phone


I have to question where you're coming up with that accusation.

After all, Apple's iOS is a far bigger competitor to Android than Windows Phone. Yet Google makes a ton of profit from iPhone's/iPad's using their services. It would be crazy to attempt to block competing platforms from using Google services. That makes no sense!

quote:
Eventually Google gave in and provided Microsoft access to the APIs, because they knew that if this went in front of a judge, they would be thrown out.


More wild speculation. Microsoft doesn't have a god-given right to Google's API's. What judge, exactly, do you know who would say otherwise?

This is like saying Microsoft has to release Windows source code so we can all make better programs...

quote:
Besides, the options we have available on Windows Phone are better (in my opinion) than Google's apps anyway, except for search.


Okay well that's your opinion. I don't know how you can arbitrarily state that the alternatives are "better" when such a gigantic majority of people opt-in to Google services daily.

I think my point still stands. The absence of Google Apps (as well as others) on Windows Phone is a major detractor to the platform. As well as perpetuates the stigma that Windows Phone's app marketplace is a barren wasteland.


RE: LOL!
By Noliving on 6/30/2013 11:38:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
First off Google makes it's money from ad revenue generated by people using it's services. Google doesn't make it's money from smartphones sales directly. Google doesn't lose profit if someone uses Gmail on a Windows Phone as apposed to Android.


Exactly, in other words they don't make money on Windows Phone if they don't use Gmail but instead use Outlook.com.

quote:
After all, Apple's iOS is a far bigger competitor to Android than Windows Phone. Yet Google makes a ton of profit from iPhone's/iPad's using their services. It would be crazy to attempt to block competing platforms from using Google services. That makes no sense!


Yes they do but considering Apple is now switching over to Bing as their default search engine....You can see the issue that crops up, Apple starts using Bing Search and Bing Maps until they get their search engine and maps; then you have Windows Phone market share only increasing and with no access to Google apps. Google starts to lose revenue from Apple and no real way to generate any real revenue on the growing Windows Phone.

quote:
More wild speculation. Microsoft doesn't have a god-given right to Google's API's. What judge, exactly, do you know who would say otherwise?


He is not saying that Microsoft has a god-given right to the API's or that a judge would force Google to hand them over. What he is saying is that if Google was to take Microsoft to court over the fact that they were not including Google ads they would lose and thus would set the precedent that you don't need to use Google API's to access Google products. Why is this a problem? Because it means that Microsoft doesn't have to use Google's API's to access Google products thus Google doesn't have anyway of generating revenue to pay for the usage from Windows Phone. It also means that Apple could then develop their own API's to access Google products and not have to display ads or in the worse case with Apple they could display their own ads and reap all the revenue.


RE: LOL!
By fredgiblet on 6/29/2013 5:17:16 PM , Rating: 2
My Android phone came with 2.2, it still has 2.2 and is never going to be updated. Microsoft is not saying that you handset will be worthless, they are saying you'll have to upgrade to WP9 o continue receiving OS updates, that's par for the course in the smartphone market.


RE: LOL!
By johnsmith9875 on 7/22/2013 3:59:10 PM , Rating: 2
I guess that means if you write a virus for Windows 8 you can also infect Windows 8 phone as a bonus.


RE: LOL!
By nikon133 on 6/27/2013 6:02:38 PM , Rating: 2
Even if you include WP7 into account, Windows Phone is growing faster than iPhone was in the same timeframe. I'd lucky-guess Android as well, it had really slow start.

Considering competition Windows Phone is facing (compared to competition iPhone was facing back in it's days), I'd say WP is doing fine - if they manage to keep the momentum, of course.

Personally, I'm moderately optimistic - I think they have reached critical threshold and will keep growing.


RE: LOL!
By BabelHuber on 6/28/2013 3:28:37 AM , Rating: 2
Sorry, but this is BS.

With the first iPhone, Apple reached a market share of 11% within months.

Microsoft is in the smartphone business since 2001 and reached 3% market share in Q1 2013.

I do not buy the marketing nonsense that MS is new in the game. They had 6 a year head start compared to iOS and 8 years compared to Android.

And look where they are now. This is a failure of epic proportions and shows that Ballmer needs to be fired.


RE: LOL!
By fredgiblet on 6/29/2013 5:19:23 PM , Rating: 3
The iPhone was a PR darling that was competing against BlackBerry and Windows Mobile which were both HEAVILY business oriented. Windows Phone is going up again Android and iOS. In short WP is facing far stronger resistance and they don't have the Jobs magic to sell them, they're doing very well for the circumstances.


"It looks like the iPhone 4 might be their Vista, and I'm okay with that." -- Microsoft COO Kevin Turner














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