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The new Honda Accord Hybrid is rated at 47 mpg combined

There's a battle brewing in the midsize car market. Midsize cars like the Accord and Camry have long been among the best-selling vehicles in America, but increased competition in recent years (thanks to redesigns of the Hyundai Sonata, Nissan Altima, and Ford Fusion) have led to an ever bigger boom in midsize car sales.
 
With that in mind, most of the major players have added hybrid models (or diesels) to their midsize offerings in order to boost fuel economy. Honda's last Accord Hybrid was a flop (it was positioned more towards performance than fuel economy), but the Japanese auto giant is looking to knock out a few of its competitors teeth with new 2014 Accord Hybrid.

 
The new Accord Hybrid, which is based on the ninth-generation Accord that launched last year, will get an estimated 49 mpg in the city and 45 mpg on the highway (47 mpg combined). Compared to its major competition, the Accord Hybrid more than holds its own:
 
Toyota Camry Hybrid: 43/39 (city/highway)
Hyundai Sonata Hybrid: 36/40
Ford Fusion Hybrid: 47/47
Chevrolet Malibu Eco: 25/37
Volkswagen Passat TDI (DSG): 30/40
Volkswagen Passat TDI (Manual): 31/43
 
The Accord Hybrid makes use of a 2.0-liter Atkinson-cycle 4-cylinder engine, a 124-kW electric motor and a lithium-ion battery pack. According to Honda, the electric motor can power the vehicle alone at low speeds and "medium to high speed cruising."

 
The Accord Hybrid will join the Accord Plug-in Hybrid in Honda's midsize lineup. Pricing hasn't yet been revealed for the Accord Hybrid, but we're guessing that it will be price competitive with the Camry Hybrid ($26,140 MSRP) and Fusion Hybrid ($27,200 MSRP).

Source: Honda



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RE: Data error??
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 6/24/2013 12:10:26 PM , Rating: 2
In the application specific to the Sonata and Optima, only regular is required. It says so in the manual, and the senior powertrain engineer even confirms it.

quote:
The engine is required to sip nothing more exotic than 87 octane fuel. That is, the 2.0T generates its 274 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 269 pound-feet of torque from 1,750-4,500 rpm on the cheap stuff. Typically, elevated specific output and low octane are mutually exclusive, making this achievement worth talking about.

Timothy White, the Sonata's senior powertrain engineer, reckons that this requirement amplified the difficulty of balancing low-end throttle response with a lofty peak horsepower target. This is because boosted engines generate high cylinder pressures, increasing their propensity for pre-ignition (knocking), which in turn limits how much grunt you can safely produce at both ends of the torque curve.


http://www.edmunds.com/hyundai/sonata/2011/road-te...


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