backtop


Print 30 comment(s) - last by timothyd97402.. on Jun 16 at 12:17 PM

He added that Palm's technologies are now seen in Apple, Android and Windows devices

Former Palm CEO Jon Rubinstein said that selling Palm to Hewlett-Packard (HP) was a "waste," considering Palm's technologies are now seen in today's most popular devices.

Rubinstein told FierceWireless in an interview that Palm's innovative technologies were lost in the sale to HP, and he would reconsider the Palm/HP sale if he could go back in time. 

"I'm not sure I would have sold the company to HP. That's for sure," said Rubinstein. "Talk about a waste. Not that I had any choice because when you sell a company you don't get to decide that. Obviously, the board and shareholders decide that. If we had known they were just going to shut it down and never really give it a chance to flourish, what would have been the point of selling the company?"

Rubinstein added that Palm's technologies, like multitasking and Synergy, are now seen in mobile operating systems like iOS, Android and Windows Phone. He said it's even said in desktop operating systems like Mac OS X. Palm may have been ahead of its time.


"It's not just mobile platforms," said Rubinstein. "If you look at the notifications on Mac OS X, it looks just like webOS, too. We did a lot of things that were very, very innovative. Obviously, multitasking, notifications, Synergy, how we handled the multiple cards… Our over-the-air updates and mechanism has been updated by everybody. Our whole Synergy concept is now becoming much more common. I don't think anyone has implemented it as well as we did yet, but clearly they're all heading down that direction."

For those who need a refresher, Palm was an American smartphone manufacturer founded in 1992. During its time, the California-based company developed smartphones like the Pre, Pixi, Treo and Centro. It later released its one and only tablet, the TouchPad. Older devices ran the Palm OS Garnet operating system, but webOS was introduced as a replacement in 2009.

In April 2010, Palm was sold to HP for $1.2 billion USD. Rubinstein stuck around after the acquisition, and HP seemed optimistic about its new purchase. 

"Palm's innovative operating system provides an ideal platform to expand HP's mobility strategy and create a unique HP experience spanning multiple mobile connected devices," said Todd Bradley, executive vice president of HP's Personal Systems Group, at the time of the acquisition. "And, Palm possesses significant IP assets and has a highly skilled team. The smartphone market is large, profitable and rapidly growing, and companies that can provide an integrated device and experience command a higher share. Advances in mobility are offering significant opportunities, and HP intends to be a leader in this market."

But a little over a year later, HP said it was discontinuing all production of webOS devices. In August 2012, HP created a wholly-owned subsidiary called Gram, which consisted of Palm's remaining components. 

So what is Rubinstein doing today? 

"I'm on two boards," said Rubinstein. "I'm on Amazon and Qualcomm. And there's a logic behind those two boards. I'm a big believer in mobile and integration of the home, and wearable computing and all that stuff, and having it all tied up in the cloud. There's sort of a common theme across those companies. I think they're uniquely positioned for the future of where things are going. That's how I spend some of my time. I help out some small companies with some time. And I'm taking some time off as well right now."

Source: FierceWireless



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: No...
By lagomorpha on 6/12/2013 1:14:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Well technically there's no fundamental difference between a smartphone and a tablet either,


Yes there is. With the exception of the iPhone, smartphones can be used as phones.


RE: No...
By karimtemple on 6/12/2013 1:51:00 PM , Rating: 2
There are tablets with cell calling enabled. I'm going to need you to try a real rebuttal.


RE: No...
By Just Tom on 6/14/2013 11:57:45 AM , Rating: 2
The rebuttal was fine. Every smart phone IS a cell phone; the vast majority of tablets are not.

They are all computers though...


"Intel is investing heavily (think gazillions of dollars and bazillions of engineering man hours) in resources to create an Intel host controllers spec in order to speed time to market of the USB 3.0 technology." -- Intel blogger Nick Knupffer














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki