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"Can't innovate anymore my ass!" -- Phil Schiller

Apple is definitely getting “Back to the Mac” with the announcement that it has achieved million Mountain Lion installs since launch; Tim Cook even bragged that Mountain Lion is approaching 40 percent penetration on Macs while Microsoft is struggling to meet 5 percent penetration with Windows 8.
 
But Mountain Lion is so last year; Apple is already working on its successor, OS X 10.9 Mavericks. Apple is moving away its "cat themed" names and is instead looking to points of interest in California to carry it through the next decade of desktop/notebook OS development.


Finder Tabs
 
Mavericks will of course have a ton of new features including Maps, tabbed browsing for Finder, enhanced support for multiple displays, and a big focus on improving battery life for notebooks. And although Safari isn't exactly a "sexy" piece of the OS X equation, Apple has brought a wealth of changes to the browser aimed at improving battery life and improving page rendering performance.

 Battery life enhancements (L), new features in Safari (R)

Apple also announced new MacBook Airs that have "all-day" battery life. The new MacBook Airs are built around Intel's new Haswell CPU architecture, and as a result offer 12 hours of battery (13" model) and 9 hours of battery life (11" model). The notebooks now include 802.11ac support and PCIe-based SSDs. The 11" will start at $999 with 128GB of storage while the 13" model will start at $1099 with 128GB of storage.

 
The biggest hardware announcement, however, came in the form of the new Mac Pro. This totally redesigned professional workstation totally throws out the rulebook when it comes to desktops with a cylindrical design.
 
Phil Schiller took this opportunity to exclaim, "Can't innovate anymore my ass!". This is obviously a retort to the score of people that say that Apple has lost its way.

 
The new Mac Pro will support up to 12-core configs of Intel's next generation Xeon processors.1866MHz DDR3 memory, PCIe flash (1.25GBps reads, 1GBps writes), six Thunderbolt 2 ports, and dual AMD FirePro workstation GPUs.
 
The new Mac Pro will debut this fall and will be built in the United States.

Source: Apple



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By Solandri on 6/10/2013 6:16:45 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Its weird that there aren't more case designs with vertical cooling built in mind.

It's because it's a non-optimal configuration which makes airflow perpendicular to heat flow, instead of parallel to it. In layman's terms, if the air is being sucked in from the bottom and exhausted at the top, components higher up your chimney will have less cooling because they're getting air that's been warmed up by components lower in the chimney.

Ideally you want airflow to be parallel to the flow of heat. e.g. heatsink fan sucks in air through the sides of the heatsink and blows it out the top. So the heatsink is hottest at the bottom (closest to CPU), coolest at the top. Air is coolest at the bottom, hottest at the top. That makes the heat gradient consistent across the air temperature gradient (a certain temperature air always sees the same temperature metal), providing uniform cooling.

On top of that, if your heat gradient is in a moving loop (e.g. water cooling), you want the cooling medium (usually air) moving in the opposite direction of heat flow. That sets up a countercurrent heat exchanger, which is the most efficient at both extracting heat and lowering temperature.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countercurrent_exchan...

If they'd set up an active water cooling loop which pumped water across all the CPUs and GPUs, sent the water to the top where it was cooled by hot air being exhausted, then moved down until it was finally cooled by fresh air being taken in, then this would be a really sweet countercurrent cooling setup. But as best as I can tell, they're not using water cooling. They're just shunting a bunch of heat pipes to the center. So if there's any vertical separation of CPUs and GPUs, stuff higher up will run hotter than stuff further down.

Also, I'd need to do some calcs but my intuition says a circular shape is the worst shape for this. To maximize heat exchange, you want to maximize surface area presented to the airflow. A circular cross-section minimizes surface area encountering a given volume of airflow. That's why your car's radiator is a big rectangular grill positioned to present maximum surface area to incoming air. But there are mitigating factors having to do with boundary flow which may flip it the other way (the car's radiator is not as deep as the Mac Pro is tall) - I'd have to run some calcs to be sure. The pics however make it seem like they're not even doing that, and there's a huge open triangular region in the center where air will just pass through without cooling anything. I truly hope they have vanes running through that central space.


By Calin on 6/10/2013 7:04:47 PM , Rating: 2
As the cooling fans are round, and the only forced induction comes from the fan (unlike in a car, where forced induction usually comes from the car moving), I can understand using a round case.
Also, they'll probably patent (if they didn't already) the cylindrical case.

As for the front of the case having nothing hot in it, the front of the case is the axle of the cooling fan, and there's much less airflow there.


By Tony Swash on 6/10/2013 7:47:23 PM , Rating: 1
Let's wait and see before we judge whether the cooling system in the new Mac Pro is good or not. All I can say is that based on their previous work on cooling systems in the pro product line one should be confident they will have done some good work, my six year old Mac Pro running four hard drives and two graphic cards is complete and utterly silent and never overheats. I can only tell if it is one by looking at the power indicator light. That's how good the cooling is.

I wish I had enough money for one of the new Mac Pros, the last time I felt like this about some new hardware it was the NeXT Cube.

Six Thunderbolt 2 ports! The possibilities are endless.


By BRB29 on 6/10/2013 8:50:22 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
my six year old Mac Pro running four hard drives and two graphic cards is complete and utterly silent and never overheats. I can only tell if it is one by looking at the power indicator light. That's how good the cooling is.


Mac book pros can fit 4 hard drives?
When you say 2 graphic cards, do you mean 1 integrated and 1 discrete? If that's the case then it's 2 gpus, not 2 cards

You can tell how good the cooling system is by the power indicator light? wtf? is this apple magic?


By BRB29 on 6/10/2013 8:57:30 PM , Rating: 2
My bad, thought he said macbook pro but he said pro.


By TakinYourPoints on 6/10/2013 9:54:56 PM , Rating: 2
Except that a solution designed around rising air has been proven time and time again to be very efficient. The Silverstone Raven and Fortress cases are well known for their cooling ability, and that is based around pushing air vertically. Adding heat to components high up isn't really something to be concerned about with "chimney" style configurations such as these.

quote:
Also, I'd need to do some calcs but my intuition says a circular shape is the worst shape for this.

...

The pics however make it seem like they're not even doing that, and there's a huge open triangular region in the center where air will just pass through without cooling anything. I truly hope they have vanes running through that central space.


Yes, the massive three sided extruded aluminum heatsink running vertically up the entire chassis that is in contact with the CPU and GPUs is just for show.

/s


By testerguy on 6/11/2013 4:33:43 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
It's because it's a non-optimal configuration which makes airflow perpendicular to heat flow, instead of parallel to it


Um, no. The heatflow, much like the airflow, is vertically upwards.

quote:
components higher up your chimney will have less cooling because they're getting air that's been warmed up by components lower in the chimney


Have you even looked at the design on the Apple website? None of the components are 'higher up your chimney'. They are all at the same level. It's a triangular prism which is effectively a giant heat sink which connects to components on all 3 sides of the prism. This means that if any one part of the system is cooler, the thermal capacity is automatically used to cool down the hotter parts. This single heatsink has airflow parallel to the flow of heat.

quote:
Ideally you want airflow to be parallel to the flow of heat. e.g. heatsink fan sucks in air through the sides of the heatsink and blows it out the top. So the heatsink is hottest at the bottom (closest to CPU), coolest at the top. Air is coolest at the bottom, hottest at the top. That makes the heat gradient consistent across the air temperature gradient (a certain temperature air always sees the same temperature metal), providing uniform cooling.


If the air is coolest at the bottom, and hottest at the top, with the heatsink hottest at the bottom and coldest at the top, you would not see 'uniform cooling' - at all. You would see more significant cooling where the temperature gradient is highest (ie at the bottom). I think you probably meant that you would achieve a temperature at the top and the bottom which are most similar when compared to other configurations.

Anyway, the configuration you speak of is exactly what Apple has built. The CPU is near the bottom and the air is coldest at the bottom and warmest at the top.

quote:
Also, I'd need to do some calcs but my intuition says a circular shape is the worst shape for this. To maximize heat exchange, you want to maximize surface area presented to the airflow. A circular cross-section minimizes surface area encountering a given volume of airflow.


You're confusing the housing with the central triangular prism. It's the prism itself, which has numerous 'bands' to increase surface area which is the part the air will come into contact with. Each 'side' of the triangular prism is effectively the rectangular car radiator you speak of. However, it's not the rectangular nature of a car radiator which gives it the most surface area, it's the grooves.


By lukarak on 6/11/2013 8:18:12 AM , Rating: 2
the circle doesn't conduct heat. The main element is the prism with its fins. Just as a car radiator has fins, which are the main element. It could be circular, or heartshaped, it wouldn't matter.


"Nowadays you can buy a CPU cheaper than the CPU fan." -- Unnamed AMD executive











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