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"Can't innovate anymore my ass!" -- Phil Schiller

Apple is definitely getting “Back to the Mac” with the announcement that it has achieved million Mountain Lion installs since launch; Tim Cook even bragged that Mountain Lion is approaching 40 percent penetration on Macs while Microsoft is struggling to meet 5 percent penetration with Windows 8.
 
But Mountain Lion is so last year; Apple is already working on its successor, OS X 10.9 Mavericks. Apple is moving away its "cat themed" names and is instead looking to points of interest in California to carry it through the next decade of desktop/notebook OS development.


Finder Tabs
 
Mavericks will of course have a ton of new features including Maps, tabbed browsing for Finder, enhanced support for multiple displays, and a big focus on improving battery life for notebooks. And although Safari isn't exactly a "sexy" piece of the OS X equation, Apple has brought a wealth of changes to the browser aimed at improving battery life and improving page rendering performance.

 Battery life enhancements (L), new features in Safari (R)

Apple also announced new MacBook Airs that have "all-day" battery life. The new MacBook Airs are built around Intel's new Haswell CPU architecture, and as a result offer 12 hours of battery (13" model) and 9 hours of battery life (11" model). The notebooks now include 802.11ac support and PCIe-based SSDs. The 11" will start at $999 with 128GB of storage while the 13" model will start at $1099 with 128GB of storage.

 
The biggest hardware announcement, however, came in the form of the new Mac Pro. This totally redesigned professional workstation totally throws out the rulebook when it comes to desktops with a cylindrical design.
 
Phil Schiller took this opportunity to exclaim, "Can't innovate anymore my ass!". This is obviously a retort to the score of people that say that Apple has lost its way.

 
The new Mac Pro will support up to 12-core configs of Intel's next generation Xeon processors.1866MHz DDR3 memory, PCIe flash (1.25GBps reads, 1GBps writes), six Thunderbolt 2 ports, and dual AMD FirePro workstation GPUs.
 
The new Mac Pro will debut this fall and will be built in the United States.

Source: Apple



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By web2dot0 on 6/10/2013 3:16:41 PM , Rating: 1
If they can improve the battery life by almost 100% (7hrs to 12hrs), that would be pretty impressive. The primary users of MacBook Air will drool over this feature.

MacPro is heading the right direction. It doesn't make sense to buy a big box with a whole whack of empty storage space never to be used. Keep the waste to a minimum and consumers can spend wisely on how they want to store their data ... externally (and promote the use of TB2 ;-D)

Keep the main machine fast (PCIe SSD) and streamline. Most of the targeted customers who uses MacPro don't upgrade their main components. Most just upgrade GPU and memory and nothing else. By the time they need to upgrade everything ... they probably should get a new computer.

Good call by Apple on this one.




By mik123 on 6/10/2013 3:24:58 PM , Rating: 2
As a primary user of Macbook Air, I want a high resolution screen. Battery life is good enough as is. If I plan to use it all day long I will find a power outlet.


By aliasfox on 6/10/2013 3:35:35 PM , Rating: 2
There's the MacBook Pro Retina 13" for a small premium in weight and price.

I presume that will be upgraded to Haswell shortly, hopefully with a quad core (or at least Iris Pro).

I presume Apple wants to keep the Retina display as the differentiating factor between Pro and Air, but if that's the case they could've been more agressive with the Air's price - $999 (or even $899) for the 13" would've done a better job getting it onto my radar, but I think I'd prefer to consider a Haswell Retina 13" for not (too) much more money.


By mik123 on 6/10/2013 4:14:56 PM , Rating: 2
But I don't want any weight premium.
All I want is a good screen and 4-5 hour battery life at MBA weight. If they offered a slimmer, lighter rMBP I would consider it as well (even at its current price).

It seems like I'll be choosing between Asus Infinity and Acer S7.


By m51 on 6/10/2013 10:38:42 PM , Rating: 2
You will probably get your wish. The improved power savings from Haswell will allow them to reduce the battery size in the rMBP 13 and slim up the product. I can't imagine that they won't slim it up, battery life is not a paramount feature like it is in the air. The rMBP is more about horsepower and good display.

It's very understandable that they didn't want to sacrifice battery life or increase size or weight in the Mac Book Air which is targeted at maximum portability. The Retina mbps need a battery 50% bigger than the airs.


By web2dot0 on 6/10/2013 6:52:30 PM , Rating: 2
Battery life is NEVER good enough. Screen resolution will add weigh and cost, which is not good for a $1000 computer.

If you are planning to use it all day, and find a power outlet, then it defeats the purpose of a MacBook Air.

Ultimately, you want a portably device to be ... well, portable, and last you all day.


By mik123 on 6/11/2013 11:46:00 AM , Rating: 2
For me 5 hours of battery life is good enough. In my ~3 years of using MBA, I can't remember a single case where I ran out of battery. I have a charger at home, and I have a charger at work. Typically, I only use the battery when I go to a meeting, or a coffee shop. Neither ever lasted more than 5 hours. When I travel, I'm never too far from an outlet, on a plane included.
Bottom line, the battery life increase from 7 to 12 hours does not make any difference to me. However the low resolution screen is not acceptable in 2013 when there are plenty of competition offering 1440p in a similar form/weight factor.


By embedded_bill on 6/10/2013 3:30:03 PM , Rating: 2
Macbook Air - the battery life win is a Haswell byproduct.

Mac Pro - people who needed the Mac Pro in previous generations go what they asked for, it was the one customer area that Apple seemed to listen to, the "Pro - whatever that means" segment and they wanted to customize and expand their Macs for their niche projects. Now they will have to do this through external thunderbolt devices which begs the question why the Mac Pro then? The CPU horespower will ceratinly be surpassed shortly by other desktops and Mac Pro buyers have certainly showen they are willing to wait as if they had a choice.


By web2dot0 on 6/10/2013 7:00:52 PM , Rating: 1
Air
===
Nobody cares how they got the battery life. The key is they deliver. Do consumers care about where Apple source their parts? People care about performance, and value.

Mac Pro
=====
The direction of the industry is MODULAR computing. That's just the way things are. You keep your interconnect investment (TB 2 storage), and upgrade the CPU/GPU/RAM if you feel it is too slow. If they are surpassed, buy a new computer when it comes out. Simple. All they need to keep up with the cadence. Once every 12months or so, which Apple should be able to deliver. Your assessment is simply wrong.

6xTB2 interconnect is more than any "PRO" user will ever need.

People keep talking about external GPU, yet, there are already 2 slots reserved for the built in GPUs. It's plenty for majority of use case. You can make the case that there's a weakness in that area, but I think the compromise is reasonable.

The most environmentally friendly workstation ever built.


By embedded_bill on 6/10/2013 10:16:03 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Nobody cares how they got the battery life

I care...
I want to know what Apple brings, not what intel brings. Consumers in general may not care, I'm asking a more educated question. What is the new MBA bringing other than the benefit of a new processor? If I were in the market for a new laptop, why an MBA? (I did buy one in 2011, and I admit they are good little machines, but my question not withstanding)

quote:
The direction of the industry is MODULAR computing. That's just the way things are.

Industry moving toward MODULAR computing? Where did you get that from? Give me a few examples of how computers in the target market of the Mac Pro. That's a broad dismissive and BS statement. There aren't really off the shelf competitors because nobody makes really makes them, they are pretty much custom built and hardly modular. A few smart peripherals here and there? Docking stations for your MBA? Pretty sad if you need a docking station for your desktop. Leave it to external PCIe enclosures to provide you with your expansion capability because you didn't already sink enough into your primary module.

quote:
6xTB2 interconnect is more than any "PRO" user will ever need.

Another BS statement, maybe less than the "640KB is more than any user will need" lore but still BS. Maybe more than anyone who buys this Mac Pro will need, assuming anyone builds useful TB2 peripherals, but it's kinda dumb to put a real "PRO" user in one of those silly little boxes, or cylinders if I may.

quote:
People keep talking about external GPU, yet, there are already 2 slots reserved for the built in GPUs

Yes there are two build in GPUs, 2.5 times more powerful than 3 year old middling technology. And those GPU interfaces are very proprietary. It remains to be seen whether anyone would bother to make upgraded GPUs for a machine that will have negligible market share. Hardly awe inspiring. Yes people do talk about external GPUs, and they will be the only way to get a reasonably modern graphics chip for this machine one year from now, unfortunately they will be very disappointed at the money they will have to shell out to get one PCIe 2.0 x16 physical slot with 8 lane performance.

quote:
The most environmentally friendly workstation ever built.

Another unsubstantiated comment, fitting way to end.


By name99 on 6/11/2013 3:44:37 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I want to know what Apple brings, not what intel brings. Consumers in general may not care, I'm asking a more educated question. What is the new MBA bringing other than the benefit of a new processor? If I were in the market for a new laptop, why an MBA? (I did buy one in 2011, and I admit they are good little machines, but my question not withstanding)


Oh for fsck's sake. What an MBA brings is OSX.
If you don't want OSX then buy another ultrabook and enjoy whatever tradeoffs the manufacturer made. But don't waste our time pretending the issue is not what it is.


By embedded_bill on 6/11/2013 9:16:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Oh for fsck's sake

Wow, your a bit emotional.

quote:
What an MBA brings is OSX

Profound yet useless, how does it smell with your head up your a$$?

Upon deeper looks, it brings PCIe SSD. There is something that apple is doing that's not just a simple processor swap.


By TakinYourPoints on 6/10/2013 4:07:58 PM , Rating: 3
Whatever I have issues with regarding the Mac Pro, the thing I love about it is the cooling design. Building all of the components around a massive vertical heatsink with a single fan cooling the whole thing is genius.

Its weird that there aren't more case designs with vertical cooling built in mind. Silverstone is one of the few companies that does this with the Fortress and Raven cases, where the motherboard tray is rotated 90 degrees so that the fans blow upwards rather than to the back.

Basic physics, it is why blowhole mods came out back in the late 90s. Why aren't more OEMs doing this?


By Solandri on 6/10/2013 6:16:45 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Its weird that there aren't more case designs with vertical cooling built in mind.

It's because it's a non-optimal configuration which makes airflow perpendicular to heat flow, instead of parallel to it. In layman's terms, if the air is being sucked in from the bottom and exhausted at the top, components higher up your chimney will have less cooling because they're getting air that's been warmed up by components lower in the chimney.

Ideally you want airflow to be parallel to the flow of heat. e.g. heatsink fan sucks in air through the sides of the heatsink and blows it out the top. So the heatsink is hottest at the bottom (closest to CPU), coolest at the top. Air is coolest at the bottom, hottest at the top. That makes the heat gradient consistent across the air temperature gradient (a certain temperature air always sees the same temperature metal), providing uniform cooling.

On top of that, if your heat gradient is in a moving loop (e.g. water cooling), you want the cooling medium (usually air) moving in the opposite direction of heat flow. That sets up a countercurrent heat exchanger, which is the most efficient at both extracting heat and lowering temperature.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countercurrent_exchan...

If they'd set up an active water cooling loop which pumped water across all the CPUs and GPUs, sent the water to the top where it was cooled by hot air being exhausted, then moved down until it was finally cooled by fresh air being taken in, then this would be a really sweet countercurrent cooling setup. But as best as I can tell, they're not using water cooling. They're just shunting a bunch of heat pipes to the center. So if there's any vertical separation of CPUs and GPUs, stuff higher up will run hotter than stuff further down.

Also, I'd need to do some calcs but my intuition says a circular shape is the worst shape for this. To maximize heat exchange, you want to maximize surface area presented to the airflow. A circular cross-section minimizes surface area encountering a given volume of airflow. That's why your car's radiator is a big rectangular grill positioned to present maximum surface area to incoming air. But there are mitigating factors having to do with boundary flow which may flip it the other way (the car's radiator is not as deep as the Mac Pro is tall) - I'd have to run some calcs to be sure. The pics however make it seem like they're not even doing that, and there's a huge open triangular region in the center where air will just pass through without cooling anything. I truly hope they have vanes running through that central space.


By Calin on 6/10/2013 7:04:47 PM , Rating: 2
As the cooling fans are round, and the only forced induction comes from the fan (unlike in a car, where forced induction usually comes from the car moving), I can understand using a round case.
Also, they'll probably patent (if they didn't already) the cylindrical case.

As for the front of the case having nothing hot in it, the front of the case is the axle of the cooling fan, and there's much less airflow there.


By Tony Swash on 6/10/2013 7:47:23 PM , Rating: 1
Let's wait and see before we judge whether the cooling system in the new Mac Pro is good or not. All I can say is that based on their previous work on cooling systems in the pro product line one should be confident they will have done some good work, my six year old Mac Pro running four hard drives and two graphic cards is complete and utterly silent and never overheats. I can only tell if it is one by looking at the power indicator light. That's how good the cooling is.

I wish I had enough money for one of the new Mac Pros, the last time I felt like this about some new hardware it was the NeXT Cube.

Six Thunderbolt 2 ports! The possibilities are endless.


By BRB29 on 6/10/2013 8:50:22 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
my six year old Mac Pro running four hard drives and two graphic cards is complete and utterly silent and never overheats. I can only tell if it is one by looking at the power indicator light. That's how good the cooling is.


Mac book pros can fit 4 hard drives?
When you say 2 graphic cards, do you mean 1 integrated and 1 discrete? If that's the case then it's 2 gpus, not 2 cards

You can tell how good the cooling system is by the power indicator light? wtf? is this apple magic?


By BRB29 on 6/10/2013 8:57:30 PM , Rating: 2
My bad, thought he said macbook pro but he said pro.


By TakinYourPoints on 6/10/2013 9:54:56 PM , Rating: 2
Except that a solution designed around rising air has been proven time and time again to be very efficient. The Silverstone Raven and Fortress cases are well known for their cooling ability, and that is based around pushing air vertically. Adding heat to components high up isn't really something to be concerned about with "chimney" style configurations such as these.

quote:
Also, I'd need to do some calcs but my intuition says a circular shape is the worst shape for this.

...

The pics however make it seem like they're not even doing that, and there's a huge open triangular region in the center where air will just pass through without cooling anything. I truly hope they have vanes running through that central space.


Yes, the massive three sided extruded aluminum heatsink running vertically up the entire chassis that is in contact with the CPU and GPUs is just for show.

/s


By testerguy on 6/11/2013 4:33:43 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
It's because it's a non-optimal configuration which makes airflow perpendicular to heat flow, instead of parallel to it


Um, no. The heatflow, much like the airflow, is vertically upwards.

quote:
components higher up your chimney will have less cooling because they're getting air that's been warmed up by components lower in the chimney


Have you even looked at the design on the Apple website? None of the components are 'higher up your chimney'. They are all at the same level. It's a triangular prism which is effectively a giant heat sink which connects to components on all 3 sides of the prism. This means that if any one part of the system is cooler, the thermal capacity is automatically used to cool down the hotter parts. This single heatsink has airflow parallel to the flow of heat.

quote:
Ideally you want airflow to be parallel to the flow of heat. e.g. heatsink fan sucks in air through the sides of the heatsink and blows it out the top. So the heatsink is hottest at the bottom (closest to CPU), coolest at the top. Air is coolest at the bottom, hottest at the top. That makes the heat gradient consistent across the air temperature gradient (a certain temperature air always sees the same temperature metal), providing uniform cooling.


If the air is coolest at the bottom, and hottest at the top, with the heatsink hottest at the bottom and coldest at the top, you would not see 'uniform cooling' - at all. You would see more significant cooling where the temperature gradient is highest (ie at the bottom). I think you probably meant that you would achieve a temperature at the top and the bottom which are most similar when compared to other configurations.

Anyway, the configuration you speak of is exactly what Apple has built. The CPU is near the bottom and the air is coldest at the bottom and warmest at the top.

quote:
Also, I'd need to do some calcs but my intuition says a circular shape is the worst shape for this. To maximize heat exchange, you want to maximize surface area presented to the airflow. A circular cross-section minimizes surface area encountering a given volume of airflow.


You're confusing the housing with the central triangular prism. It's the prism itself, which has numerous 'bands' to increase surface area which is the part the air will come into contact with. Each 'side' of the triangular prism is effectively the rectangular car radiator you speak of. However, it's not the rectangular nature of a car radiator which gives it the most surface area, it's the grooves.


By lukarak on 6/11/2013 8:18:12 AM , Rating: 2
the circle doesn't conduct heat. The main element is the prism with its fins. Just as a car radiator has fins, which are the main element. It could be circular, or heartshaped, it wouldn't matter.


"Spreading the rumors, it's very easy because the people who write about Apple want that story, and you can claim its credible because you spoke to someone at Apple." -- Investment guru Jim Cramer











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