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  (Source: The Guardian)
But will it be enough to push sales?

Microsoft is reportedly cutting the price of its Windows RT software for smaller tablets in an effort to boost sales of the failing OS

It's not clear how much Microsoft charges hardware makers for Windows RT software, and since the pricing talks are confidential, the exact amount of the price cut hasn't been released either. 

A price cut could be a helpful start to bringing Windows RT back to life. The OS was released October 26, 2012 (when Windows 8 launched) as a platform for ARM-based devices. It's not the whole Windows 8 experience, as it lacks key software (such as Windows Media Player) and isn't compatible with as many desktop applications or hardware as Intel-based Windows 8 Pro devices.

Hardware makers haven't seen a whole lot of success with RT. Back in April, many computer companies started slashing the prices of their RT-based tablets in hopes of clearing their stock. For instance, at that time, Dell's 32GB XPS 10 tablet with Windows RT launched at $500 last fall and dropped to $450. The XPS 10 was slashed again in May to a starting price of $299.99. ASUS' VivoTab RT was another device to take a cut ($599 at launch, cut to $382 for 32GB on Amazon while Newegg listed it as "discontinued").

With Computex getting underway in Taipei this week, hardware makers are unveiling future devices -- and RT doesn't seem to be in too many company plans.

Hewlett-Packard (HP) said it currently doesn't have any plans for an RT device. Acer called Windows RT "immature," and said that it is focusing on Windows 8 Pro and Android-based tablets instead. Samsung said it hasn't decided whether it should make a successor to its RT tablet. 

However, a couple of companies are continuing on with Windows RT. HTC, while deciding against a larger RT-based tablet, said it will develop a 7-inch device with Windows RT. Dell is also working on a new RT tablet and plans to update the XPS 10 this year. 

It looks like Microsoft will keep its original price of $499 for its Surface with Windows RT tablet. 

If Microsoft offers the Windows RT software (which comes pre-installed only) at a discount, hardware makers can sell devices to consumers for cheap and hopefully clear their inventory. But will a price cut be enough to push future device sales and justify R&D on RT-based tablets?

Source: Bloomberg



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How about $100?
By TheNuts on 6/4/2013 1:38:03 PM , Rating: 2
They are offering a 64GB Surface RT at Tech Ed to attendees for $100. Is it worth it?




RE: How about $100?
By Argon18 on 6/4/2013 2:04:22 PM , Rating: 2
I knew this was coming. RT tablets are such non-sellers, they have to resort to deep discounts and freebies to move inventory. Don't buy one unless your comfortable with a dead-end device. The RT ecosystem was dead on arrival, and the situation isn't going to get better. It's just like those HP WebOS tablets that HP practically gave away a couple years ago.


RE: How about $100?
By Moishe on 6/4/2013 5:04:12 PM , Rating: 2
It's not nearly as bad as the WebOS devices because Palm was dead and HP was amazingly slack.

Microsoft may give up on the RT concept, but if they do, it will still have a regular life-cycle of 3-4 years. After that, people will be upgrading anyway. Microsoft knows that ARM is up and coming and it needs to have an ARM OS. They also have deep pockets and plenty of history showing us that they take 2-3 attempts to get into a market.

All in all, it's a sales failure, but that doesn't mean it's a crappy tablet. It's a big failure in marketing mostly.


RE: How about $100?
By Moishe on 6/4/2013 4:39:19 PM , Rating: 2
Yes. I have a 32GB Surface RT and it's a great device. Even if you use it for a year, it's worth $100.

I use mine for school and work (IT). It has things like Remote desktop, VMWare View, VPN, Office 2013 (not Pro), etc. I'm happy with mine. The speed is good. Very responsive device, and I have at least one from almost every OS maker in the house.


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