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  (Source: The Guardian)
But will it be enough to push sales?

Microsoft is reportedly cutting the price of its Windows RT software for smaller tablets in an effort to boost sales of the failing OS

It's not clear how much Microsoft charges hardware makers for Windows RT software, and since the pricing talks are confidential, the exact amount of the price cut hasn't been released either. 

A price cut could be a helpful start to bringing Windows RT back to life. The OS was released October 26, 2012 (when Windows 8 launched) as a platform for ARM-based devices. It's not the whole Windows 8 experience, as it lacks key software (such as Windows Media Player) and isn't compatible with as many desktop applications or hardware as Intel-based Windows 8 Pro devices.

Hardware makers haven't seen a whole lot of success with RT. Back in April, many computer companies started slashing the prices of their RT-based tablets in hopes of clearing their stock. For instance, at that time, Dell's 32GB XPS 10 tablet with Windows RT launched at $500 last fall and dropped to $450. The XPS 10 was slashed again in May to a starting price of $299.99. ASUS' VivoTab RT was another device to take a cut ($599 at launch, cut to $382 for 32GB on Amazon while Newegg listed it as "discontinued").

With Computex getting underway in Taipei this week, hardware makers are unveiling future devices -- and RT doesn't seem to be in too many company plans.

Hewlett-Packard (HP) said it currently doesn't have any plans for an RT device. Acer called Windows RT "immature," and said that it is focusing on Windows 8 Pro and Android-based tablets instead. Samsung said it hasn't decided whether it should make a successor to its RT tablet. 

However, a couple of companies are continuing on with Windows RT. HTC, while deciding against a larger RT-based tablet, said it will develop a 7-inch device with Windows RT. Dell is also working on a new RT tablet and plans to update the XPS 10 this year. 

It looks like Microsoft will keep its original price of $499 for its Surface with Windows RT tablet. 

If Microsoft offers the Windows RT software (which comes pre-installed only) at a discount, hardware makers can sell devices to consumers for cheap and hopefully clear their inventory. But will a price cut be enough to push future device sales and justify R&D on RT-based tablets?

Source: Bloomberg



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RE: I don't understand MS
By timothyd97402 on 6/3/2013 6:30:58 PM , Rating: 2
BULL! I work on a lot of computers, laptops, even tablets. I sell them too. Nearly 100% Windows & Android passing through my business.

I own an iPhone 4s. It is quite simply the highest quality piece of gear that I own. The Android devices (mostly) don't compare on build quality. Don't even get me started on the plastic pieces of crap that are the vast majority of Windows laptops.


RE: I don't understand MS
By Argon18 on 6/4/2013 1:50:14 PM , Rating: 2
It's amazing how many folks don't get this basic concept. The majority of Windows laptops are indeed bottom dollar plastic turds. Who cares if its got a faster chip in it, as compared to the Apple product? If it feels like crap in your hands, and it's unpleasant to use, the Apple product is the superior one.

It's the same reason people buy a Mercedes instead of a Chevy. Sure you can get more HP for a cheaper price with the Chevy. But Mercedes buyers aren't comparing spec sheets - they know which one is more comfortable, more luxurious, and just plain more pleasant and pleasing to use, and they're willing to pay a premium price for that.


"Game reviewers fought each other to write the most glowing coverage possible for the powerhouse Sony, MS systems. Reviewers flipped coins to see who would review the Nintendo Wii. The losers got stuck with the job." -- Andy Marken














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