backtop


Print 32 comment(s) - last by Wombat_56.. on May 30 at 9:36 PM


Tavis Ormandy  (Source: flickr)
Tavis Ormandy said Microsoft is difficult to work with regarding these issues

A Google engineer has called Microsoft out on a recent security flaw in the Windows operating system, and even said that the Windows creator is hostile toward third-party vulnerability researchers.

Tavis Ormandy, a Google security engineer, exposed the flaw on Full Disclosure. The Microsoft vulnerability, which was in the Windows kernel driver "Win32k.sys," was featured in a Full Disclosure mailing list on May 17. 

Before that, Ormandy revealed the flaw on GitHub back in March in hopes of bringing other security researchers on board to investigate. 

Ormandy said on Full Disclosure, "I don't have much free time to work on silly Microsoft code, so I'm looking for ideas on how to fix the final obstacle for exploitation."

Ormandy posted on Full Disclosure yet again on Monday, saying "I have a working exploit that grants SYSTEM on all currently supported versions of Windows. Code is available on request to students from reputable schools."

Ormandy also insulted Microsoft on Full Disclosure, saying "As far as I can tell, this code is pre-NT (20+ years) old, so remember to thank the SDL for solving security and reminding us that old code doesn't need to be reviewed ;-)."

Microsoft has been annoyed with Ormandy for publicly discussing vulnerabilities before they could be patched. Microsoft prefers "responsible disclosure," where security experts are asked to report flaws privately to the company.

"Note that Microsoft treat[s] vulnerability researchers with great hostility, and are often very difficult to work with," said Ormandy. "I would advise only speaking to them under a pseudonym, using Tor and anonymous email to protect yourself."

Source: ComputerWorld



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Ormandy
By Wombat_56 on 5/30/2013 9:36:39 PM , Rating: 2

quote:
"I would advise only speaking to them under a pseudonym, using Tor and anonymous email to protect yourself."

Interesting suggestion given the context and considering Tor has vulnerabilities.

I'm sure things would have gone smoother had he done the respectable thing and notified MS first like most other researchers of these matters do.


I don't know about Microsoft, but there have been many other instances where people revealing security bugs have been threatened with legal action. Seems like good advice to me. And while Tor may not be perfect, it still provides a good degree of protection.


"What would I do? I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders." -- Michael Dell, after being asked what to do with Apple Computer in 1997











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki