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Ford says 66% of new cars we use four-cylinder engines by 2020

With the looming CAFE fuel economy standards, just about every automaker out there is pushing hard to migrate from larger displacement engines to engines with a smaller displacement, typically using a turbocharger to get the same sort of power output. The benefit of this is that it allows drivers to have the same performance with improved fuel economy.

One of the most successful automakers at making this transition away from higher displacement engines has been Ford with its line of EcoBoost power plants. Detroit News reports that Ford is projecting an increase in sales for vehicles using four-cylinder engines and that by 2020 66% of all new vehicles will use smaller displacement four-cylinder engines.

"I think it's maybe a stretch. But I don't find it implausible," said Bill Visnic, senior editor at the car research site Edmunds.com, in a telephone interview. "If you look at where things have been going segment by segment, except pickups, you could say that's been the trend."

In 2008, only 40% of new vehicles sold used four-cylinder engines compared to 53% today. Currently, the majority of small and medium-size cars on the automotive market come standard with a four-cylinder engine. Most compact SUVs also come standard with four-cylinder engine. Full-size pickups and full-size SUVs currently come with six and eight-cylinder engine options. In 2012, sales of pickup trucks accounted for 13% of all new market sales.
 
Mike Osmotoso of LMC Automotive notes that to achieve that 66% goal, "[Ford would be] expecting pickups and full-size SUVs to virtually disappear."

Considering that the Ford F-150 is the automaker's best-selling vehicle, the more likely scenario would have entry-level trucks using EcoBoost four-cylinder engines producing the same power output as current base level V-6 engines.

Source: Detroit News



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RE: "Disappearing" Trucks
By BRB29 on 5/21/2013 3:06:01 PM , Rating: 1
I think what people are thinking about are the actual costs incurred to environment and infrastructure. A truck that weighs 2x and use 2x fuel will pay 2x more on taxes. However, the damage on roads and environment is higher than 2x.

Using more fuels will also cause higher demand and raise prices.


RE: "Disappearing" Trucks
By Spuke on 5/21/2013 3:25:41 PM , Rating: 2
I see what you're saying but I haven't seen a study that has determined how much more a pickup truck damages roads and environment than a lighter vehicle. I'm sure there's some amount more but is it significant enough to charge a fee for?

quote:
Using more fuels will also cause higher demand and raise prices.
Anyone using fuel is causing higher demand and since most vehicles driven are by far CARS not trucks/SUV's/whatnot (see Ford's 13% comment above), a significant reduction in demand will come from driving less CARS not trucks/etc.


RE: "Disappearing" Trucks
By lagomorpha on 5/21/2013 6:00:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I see what you're saying but I haven't seen a study that has determined how much more a pickup truck damages roads and environment than a lighter vehicle. I'm sure there's some amount more but is it significant enough to charge a fee for?


The general formula is that damage to a road from vehicles is proportional to the cube of the axle weight times the number of axles. For example, if a truck weighs 4000 pounds then each axle weights 2000 pounds (yeah yeah different weight distribution than 50/50, this is just an example) so 2000 cubed is 8000000000 times 2 axles is 16,000,000,000 units of road damage.

Try putting in a few numbers and you'll quickly see that it takes a LOT of Suburbans to cause the same road wear as a single 80,000 pound semi.

Of course that's just for vehicle induced damage. Any place that goes through a lot of heating and cooling is going to be repairing the roads frequently whether there is traffic going over them or not.


RE: "Disappearing" Trucks
By BRB29 on 5/22/2013 10:04:02 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I see what you're saying but I haven't seen a study that has determined how much more a pickup truck damages roads and environment than a lighter vehicle. I'm sure there's some amount more but is it significant enough to charge a fee for?

It depends on what truck you are talking about. Any semi will damage the roads and environment more than a regular car. Given its workload and weight, it is actually much more fuel efficient and environmentally friendly.

A consumer truck is usually pretty bad compared a regular sedan. Some people use these trucks for what it's made for but the vast majority just want a truck and hardly use it for anything besides transportation.

quote:
Anyone using fuel is causing higher demand and since most vehicles driven are by far CARS not trucks/SUV's/whatnot (see Ford's 13% comment above), a significant reduction in demand will come from driving less CARS not trucks/etc.


Yes, 13% of new market sales are trucks. But that 13% caused more than 13% of the problem. We don't need statistics to tell us that. Trucks pollute more, use more fuel, and cause more road damage. Most truck/suv owners use them for daily driving.


RE: "Disappearing" Trucks
By Spuke on 5/22/2013 2:47:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Yes, 13% of new market sales are trucks. But that 13% caused more than 13% of the problem. We don't need statistics to tell us that. Trucks pollute more, use more fuel, and cause more road damage. Most truck/suv owners use them for daily driving.
You were being quite reasonable until this post. That's a TON of assumptions with no facts at all just your opinions. At least I asked some questions above to find out some real data. You seem quite satisfied that you're right regardless of whether you've got supporting data or not. Since I don't operate that way at all, we're done talking.


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