backtop


Print 24 comment(s) - last by boeush.. on May 28 at 6:14 PM

Anonymous launched a global online protest to mark the 100th day of the hunger strike by Guantanamo Bay prisoners

The Guantanamo Bay detention camp is losing all access to wireless internet and social networks due to hacking threats

U.S. military officials have blocked access to wireless internet and social networks like Facebook and Twitter at Guantanamo Bay because it fears that international hacking group Anonymous will launch an attack to disrupt services at the naval base.

Anonymous launched a global online protest to mark the 100th day of the hunger strike by Guantanamo Bay prisoners. The detainees have been protesting their living conditions and indefinite detention at the base. 

About 103 of the 166 prisoners are on strike.


The U.S. military said it has been receiving online hacking threats amid the hunger strike, which were allegedly from Anonymous. 

The hunger strike has captured a lot of attention on networks like Twitter and Facebook. Many, including human rights activist groups, are calling for the closure of Guantanamo Bay.

The Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a prison and interrogation facility placed within the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba. It is ran by the U.S. military, and was established in 2002 by the Bush Administration to hold those connected with the Global War on Terror including Afghanistan, Iraq, the Horn of Africa and Southeast Asia.

Sources: RT, Associated Press



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Let's see here...
By inperfectdarkness on 5/27/2013 8:04:24 AM , Rating: 2
I'm game to hear how YOU would handle the situation.

Everything I've studied on the issue says that the shortcoming has to do with international laws which apply to these cases--not unilateral actions on behalf of any one state actor.


RE: Let's see here...
By boeush on 5/28/2013 6:14:57 PM , Rating: 1
You wrote that granting the bill of rights to these "demonstrated" enemy combatants would be "extraordinarily bad".

I submit that we grant the bill or rights to monsters like Timothy McVeigh and James Holmes, and we do so on principle. What could possibly be so fundamentally different about these creatures, other than the fact that they were born on U.S. soil?

On the other hand, you can't just assume someone is an "enemy combatant", never mind "terrorist", because they were forced to confess under torture, or they're claimed to be guilty by some warlord who probably sought reciprocal advantage, or because some field agent said so with no further proof, or because they just happened to be at the wrong place, at the wrong time, or maybe because they just happen to look like someone or have the same name as someone else.

And it's not as if any of this is really new. Britain was dealing with the IRA for decades, long before 9/11. This stupidity about "war on terror" has to stop. These people, when they are not in fact soldiers on a field of battle, are nothing more or less than criminal thugs conspiring to commit crimes. They must be investigated, arrested, and put on trial as such. It's really very simple.

AFAIK, there are a handful of reasons why this isn't being done with the Guantanamo detainees. First reason, is pure political grand-standing, a.k.a. pure bullshit. Second reason, is most (if not all) of the evidence is fatally tainted because it's obtained via torture or other invalid methods -- so no sane and lawful court would admit such evidence into the proceedings. Third reason, is there is actually no evidence at all, and we're only holding these people to save face: releasing them would be tantamount to admitting we made a series of horrible mistakes, and ruined these peoples' lives and heaped injury upon insult upon injury for no good reason only because we were panicking and losing our heads precisely as Bin Laden hoped we would. All of these reasons, I'm absolutely certain, play some part in the cases of most of the detainees still being held; all of them are unacceptable.

There's only one actually valid reason, and that is classified intelligence gathering methods and sensitive intelligence information that would come to the light of day in a trial. However, I think that's easily dealt with, in closed court proceedings, by swearing the jurors, the advocates, the judge, and all attendant clerks and officers, to secrecy under penalty of treason.


"Let's face it, we're not changing the world. We're building a product that helps people buy more crap - and watch porn." -- Seagate CEO Bill Watkins














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki