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Next-generation Volt could cost as much as $10,000 less to produce

In the world of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles, the Chevrolet Volt has been the most high-profile entry aimed at consumers. However, the biggest problem for GM when it comes to the current Volt is that the vehicle isn't profitable.

"This car, on a technology scale, is off the charts vs. what you [have] seen," said GM CEO Dan Akerson, who owns one personally. "We've sold about 26,500 of them [and] we're losing money on every one."

Akerson says that the loss GM takes on every Volt that it sales will soon come to an end. The automaker has significant improvement planned for the second-generation vehicle, including making it lighter. Less weight means that the electric driving range can be made extended without adding larger battery packs -- the battery pack on the current generation Volt battery weighs 400 pounds alone.


According to Akerson, GM believes that the cost to build the Volt can be reduced in the range of $7,000 to $10,000 on the second-generation model. That doesn't necessarily mean buyers will see a discount, but it will mean GM doesn't take a loss on each vehicle it sells.

The current Volt has proven to be a hit with owners, as many are claiming they can go as far as 900 miles between fill ups.

Source: Fortune



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Bailout Mentality
By Reclaimer77 on 5/3/2013 9:50:21 AM , Rating: -1
quote:
"We've sold about 26,500 of them [and] we're losing money on every one. "


Does anymore need to be said honestly? They owe billions to the US taxpayer still. Yet they've invested who-knows how much in a vehicle that's not profitable, and might not ever be. Because of politics.

Would a GM today that's free of Cronyism and went through a proper restructuring throw away money like this on Obama's dream machine? I don't think so.




RE: Bailout Mentality
By kelmerp on 5/3/2013 9:56:06 AM , Rating: 5
The first gen vehicle is basically sunk R&D. GM needs to spend this money to stay competitive in the global marketplace. Toyota and Honda are spending money like crazy on hybrid technology and are making money doing it, so this is GM just trying to pay catch-up.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By mdogs444 on 5/3/2013 9:59:07 AM , Rating: 2
Toyota and Honda are selling hybrid cars that are about $20,000 without the tax credit. You really think GM is competing with that?


RE: Bailout Mentality
By kwrzesien on 5/3/2013 10:09:00 AM , Rating: 2
That is exactly the problem, they don't know who they are competing against. When deciding to buy a Volt what other vehicles is the buyer considering? A hybrid Camry? Prius? Maybe something like a Mercedes C250 or even a C350? There are a lot of quality cars in the same price range, plenty of near luxury and luxury sedans from Europe and Japan to choose from!


RE: Bailout Mentality
By lagomorpha on 5/3/13, Rating: -1
RE: Bailout Mentality
By RU482 on 5/3/2013 11:36:30 AM , Rating: 2
do ANY cars NOT lock the doors at some point after putting it in gear?


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Spuke on 5/3/2013 11:43:10 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
do ANY cars NOT lock the doors at some point after putting it in gear?
Even my wife's Bimmer auto locks the doors.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By zephyrprime on 5/3/2013 12:04:41 PM , Rating: 2
Pretty sure most all new cars do that.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Samus on 5/3/2013 10:35:35 PM , Rating: 2
This can usually be disabled.

In some Ford's, turn the key three times on/off leaving in the on position and you will hear a ding ding ding, press the brake pedal twice then turn the key to off position. To change back to locking doors, do the same sequence but press the brakes once.

In other Fords its as simple as holding both the remote keyfob lock/unlock buttons for 5 seconds while the vehicle is in motion. The doors will unlock then relock indicating they will lock upon driving greater than 12mph. Do the sequence again and the doors will unlock, lock, then unlock to disable the motion auto-lock feature...

Research...


RE: Bailout Mentality
By marvdmartian on 5/6/2013 8:42:28 AM , Rating: 2
Geez, that's more complicated than using the ruby red slippers to get back to Kansas! ;)


RE: Bailout Mentality
By bradhall on 5/6/2013 10:41:06 AM , Rating: 2
What happened to up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, b, a, b, a, (select for two players), start!


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Midnight Rambler on 5/5/2013 11:05:05 PM , Rating: 2
There's a very good reason that cars now have this feature. It is for safety. Specifically, doors are waaay less prone to open (by a strength factor of almost 4to1) in a crash/impact when the door latch is in the "secondary" latching position. And when the door latch is "locked" it helps to keep the latch in the "secondary" latched position. Furthermore, most passive restraint seat belt systems, as well as air bag systems, "monitor" via sensor the position of the door latch's "fork bolt" (this is the part of the latch that engages the car body's striker bolt, keeping it shut). In some cases, if the latch is not fully latched (ie. in the secondary position) and locked, the belts and/or the bags may not work properly, or at all.

I was one of the product design engineers for the "mini wedge" and the follow-up "global" door latches for GM. These latches are also found on many other vehicles from Toyota, Subaru, Isuzu, etc.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/3/2013 11:37:14 AM , Rating: 2
The locking doors, I assume, are for children and if you think this is stopping cars from selling... all I can say is lol.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BillyBatson on 5/3/2013 11:46:54 AM , Rating: 2
What on earth are you complaining about?!? What use would opening the doors while th car is in drive have other than if pure trying to bailout of the car like in a movie?
And what new car these days doesn't automatically lock it's doors seconds after you put it in drive? None. They all have the feature.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By hughlle on 5/3/2013 12:21:29 PM , Rating: 2
Cars have been doing this for over a decade. I recall our original A class would do it once you passed 10mph.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BillyBatson on 5/3/2013 12:27:31 PM , Rating: 2
I think every car other than my 85' corolla have all done it. I know all 4 cars I have leased since 2007 have all had this feature. I have also never been in a situation where this feature got in the way.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Schrag4 on 5/3/2013 1:27:54 PM , Rating: 1
This "gets in the way" on our van because we're always unloading kids and we have to manually unlock it. That's not a bad thing, though, since it means the kids can't just bolt from the van once we stop.

The car I drive to work auto-locks and also auto-UNLOCKS when I turn off the engine - pretty handy. It would be handiest if every vehicle let the owner set it to work as he or she saw fit for his or her own situation, IMO.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BillyBatson on 5/3/13, Rating: 0
RE: Bailout Mentality
By BillyBatson on 5/5/2013 4:25:24 PM , Rating: 2
down voted for?.... lol some people have issues on this forum, with everything is seems


RE: Bailout Mentality
By theapparition on 5/3/2013 12:28:31 PM , Rating: 2
There's a lot of things to complain about GM for (and every other car manufacturer, for that matter), but if auto locking doors is your issue, that's about the most ridiculous statements I've ever seen.

Besides, find another car these days that doesn't auto lock.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By FITCamaro on 5/3/2013 1:47:04 PM , Rating: 2
Pretty much all new cars do this and honestly I like the feature. Saves me from having to lock the doors myself. And on the second pull of the handle, the door auto-unlocks as well. On my car anyway.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Spuke on 5/3/2013 2:35:21 PM , Rating: 2
On my Solstice, I have to unlock the doors if the engine is running, if the engine is not running, they unlock themselves. My wife's car has to unlock them whether engine is running or not (second pull like your car or press the main lock/unlock on the dash).


RE: Bailout Mentality
By superflex on 5/3/13, Rating: 0
RE: Bailout Mentality
By Samus on 5/3/13, Rating: 0
RE: Bailout Mentality
By AlphaVirus on 5/3/13, Rating: -1
RE: Bailout Mentality
By FITCamaro on 5/3/2013 1:48:00 PM , Rating: 2
Well heck go on Tesla's webpage and look at the "math" that they use to show you a far cheaper monthly cost than what you'll actually pay.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Jeffk464 on 5/3/2013 10:33:16 AM , Rating: 5
Toyota Prius also sold at a loss at first, it is now profitable.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Mint on 5/3/2013 10:49:03 AM , Rating: 5
It's mind boggling how myopic these people are.

Let's see how many of them admit that their mentality here would result in the Prius not being developed. Good thing they're not running any companies.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/13, Rating: 0
RE: Bailout Mentality
By zephyrprime on 5/3/2013 12:07:34 PM , Rating: 2
The ev1 was an electric car but I certainly wouldn't call it a good electric car.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By theapparition on 5/3/2013 12:31:06 PM , Rating: 3
While I agree with a lot of what you have posted, this made me lol.

quote:
The people posting about it are not myopic, they just have a business sense.

Do you actually thing the average readership at DT has a clue how to run a business?


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 1:31:27 PM , Rating: 2
I'm not sure they have the "whole package" that would be required to run a business, but I'm always surprised in everyday life how some people have absolutely no clue about basic fundamentals regarding money or business. Some posters on here do seem to have common sense regarding that.

While many on this site are fanboys of any new tech (since it's a tech site), it requires a little bit of business sense to realize which ideas are practical and which ones aren't.

I'm surprised that some people on here thought Windows 8 was going to be a hit when it was obvious to me that it would flop.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Spuke on 5/3/2013 3:11:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I'm surprised that some people on here thought Windows 8 was going to be a hit when it was obvious to me that it would flop.
IMO, I think the "flop" was due to a too early release. If they would've waited till 7 got "old", I think sales would've been better. I expect "blue" to fail for the same reasons.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 3:37:48 PM , Rating: 2
I think the main reason it failed was because they made drastic UI changes that didn't benefit the customer but rather were tradeoffs meant to push customers towards Microsoft's mobile device initiative. People felt that these changes were not necessary, made no sense, and were being "pushed" onto them. Microsoft took choice away from the customer, and the customer kept their money in their pocket.

I said this once and I'll say it again- the Start Button will return to Windows. People thought I was crazy when I said this around Christmas time and even Microsoft said that it was gone for good. But that's not how business works. The customer dictates demand, not the company. The customer spoke loudly and clearly by voting with their wallets and shunning Windows 8. Microsoft, being a business, wants to make sales. They'll get these sales by delivering what the customer wants.

Expect the concept of choice to return to Windows 8. Alongside the Start screen, the option to boot to the desktop and have the Start button will be there.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Spuke on 5/3/2013 6:41:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think the main reason it failed was because they made drastic UI changes that didn't benefit the customer but rather were tradeoffs meant to push customers towards Microsoft's mobile device initiative.
I disagree. I think it's much simpler than that. Win7 hasn't even taken completely over the market but MS wants everyone to dump that and go to 8? Nah, I'm not even running 8 at home and I bought it last year. 7 works just fine and I'm positive the average user (and average business) feels the same way. The only people I hear whining about the UI are geeky types. Not one regular person or business has complained to me about it (yes anecdotal but so are the complaints about the UI). IMO, 7 won't get replaced by the average person until after "Blue" IMO when their computers get old and they're ready for an upgrade. And by then I expect people to be buying Win9/10/whatever on tablets.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 9:42:56 PM , Rating: 2
You can't deny that the Metro interface has been a flop. Nobody seems to want anything with Metro on it. Businesses don't want it and consumers don't want it. Sales of Windows 8 have fallen far short of projections. Windows phone isn't gaining much traction. Surface isn't selling well either.

Microsoft has to be scared for their future right now. They made a huge investment to get behind this massive push into mobile and it's fallen flat on all fronts.

A couple months ago I was arguing with many people who denied that Windows 8 was flopping. Now those people have vanished. It's a foregone conclusion by this point.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Mint on 5/3/2013 4:55:28 PM , Rating: 2
If GM waited they would just be behind the curve. They'd still have to go through the expense of developing technology and parts for the first time and not achieving minimal production cost in their first attempt.

If Nissan delayed the introduction of the Leaf, they wouldn't have hit an MSRP or $29k today. They got there by taking what they learned from the original Japan plant and improving efficiency for the US one. Yeah, the exchange rate was part of their problem, but not all $6k of the reduction.

Parts for novel industries don't get cheaper before they're invented. GM's Volt transmission is unique. Car batteries have different design goals than those for laptops/cellphones. With cars, you want it to last 3000+ cycles, while a laptops won't lose any sales if it's under 500. The appropriate chemistry would be a niche without EVs, so cost reduction would be slow and inapplicable to EV volumes.

This is why it's important to get the ball rolling.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 5:29:18 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
They'd still have to go through the expense of developing technology and parts for the first time and not achieving minimal production cost in their first attempt.


GM and Toyota usually don't develop this technology; they incorporate off-the-shelf technology into their designs.

For instance, if you wanted to build your own cell phone you wouldn't have to reinvent the transceiver, the GPS chip, the processor, the memory, the compass, etc. These things have already been invented by third party companies and you'd incorporate them into your design. Due to everyone else using these parts in their designs the cost of these parts is reduced compared to only a few years ago.

quote:
If Nissan delayed the introduction of the Leaf, they wouldn't have hit an MSRP or $29k today. They got there by taking what they learned from the original Japan plant and improving efficiency for the US one.


While I'm sure they gained some efficiency by building the car for a few years, the main cost savings is in the parts becoming more popular and as a result cheaper. I'm sure that high-power electric motors and high-capacity batteries are cheaper than they were 5 years ago.

quote:
GM's Volt transmission is unique.


I agree that the Volt's transmission is unique since that's not used in any other application.

quote:
The appropriate chemistry would be a niche without EVs, so cost reduction would be slow and inapplicable to EV volumes.


As far as I know, GM doesn't make the Volt's batteries. They use off-the-shelf cells made by LG Chem in Korea. LG Chem (and other companies) had already developed these kinds of batteries before the Volt was thought of.

http://lgcpi.com/applications.shtml


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Mint on 5/3/2013 7:30:28 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
For instance, if you wanted to build your own cell phone you wouldn't have to reinvent the transceiver, the GPS chip, the processor, the memory, the compass, etc. These things have already been invented by third party companies and you'd incorporate them into your design.
That's because the industry has now been established. You didn't have third parties offering off thee shelf parts this before cellphones were commonplace.

quote:
the main cost savings is in the parts becoming more popular and as a result cheaper.
You're just proving my point. The parts wouldn't have become more popular if they held off introducing EVs until costs went down, waiting for someone else to make them popular. It's a chicken and egg problem.

quote:
They use off-the-shelf cells made by LG Chem in Korea. LG Chem (and other companies) had already developed these kinds of batteries before the Volt was thought of.
The Volt started development in 2006, battery testing was in 2008, and production was in late 2010. Batteries technology from LG advanced during that time to win the contract, and even now it continues to diverge from those used in consumer electronics (which prioritize energy density over cost per cycle).

If the automakers just waited for better batteries, we would be well behind in automotive battery tech today.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Reclaimer77 on 5/5/2013 7:11:02 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Good thing they're not running any companies.


Yes because GM is the epitome of how you run a company. Great example!!!

Are you seriously this stupid?

quote:
Let's see how many of them admit that their mentality here would result in the Prius not being developed.


Completely separate issue and not analogous to GM's current situation at all.

Is baseless trolling all you have?


RE: Bailout Mentality
By bobsmith1492 on 5/3/2013 11:11:51 AM , Rating: 2
There is a big difference between a car with a $10,000 battery pack and a $1000 pack.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By lelias2k on 5/3/2013 11:21:47 AM , Rating: 2
No, GM is developing something that is light years ahead of a freaking Prius. I worked at a GM dealership and was a Volt specialist. There is not comparison between the two cars.

I am not talking about features, nor MPG, but driving experience.

Just do one quick test: put a Prius through a mild uphill and then take the Volt on the same path. Try increasing the speed on both.

Then come back and tell me they are competing vehicles.

The only people bashing the Volt are the ones who haven't tried it.

Is it a vehicles for everyone? Of course not, as that doesn't exist. But it is the first step in a very different direction.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/13, Rating: -1
RE: Bailout Mentality
By jimbojimbo on 5/3/2013 12:01:44 PM , Rating: 2
37MPG? Where have you been? You do know that you can plug in the Volt and charge it right?


RE: Bailout Mentality
By theapparition on 5/3/13, Rating: 0
RE: Bailout Mentality
By Dr of crap on 5/3/2013 12:53:21 PM , Rating: 1
THE HONDA!
AND yes the Volt will go all of 35 miles on a charge. Yahooo, 35 MILES, THEN it uses gas.

IF YOU live in the city, you probably don't need a $40,000 Volt anyway!


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/3/2013 12:56:36 PM , Rating: 2
Honda for me as well. I miss my 05 SI Hatch :(


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BRB29 on 5/3/2013 1:20:47 PM , Rating: 1
I live in the city and I wish I have a Volt. Both prius and volt are great city cars as idling won't use up gas. I save a lot of money as my ICE car right now average 15mpg because I shit in traffic all day.

The Prius blows balls on the highway while the Volt cruises much better.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 2:09:00 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I live in the city and I wish I have a Volt.


Why don't you buy a Volt, then?

I suspect the main reason is the same reason that I and most other people don't buy them- they're too expensive for what you get.

Sure, the Volt looks like a very nice car. I'd like to have one, too. But they're almost $40,000. Even if someone gave me $40,000, there would be more practical uses for the money. I could buy a less expensive car and use the extra money to pay down my mortgage.

My main point of contention isn't the quality of the Volt, it's the practicality of the Volt when you consider the price. The Volt would be an awesome $25k car. It's a lackluster $39,145 car.

It's the same problem that plagues the Mazda 2. I've driven one and it's a great little car. But they priced it almost the same as the Mazda 3. Hardly anyone would buy an awesome "budget" car like the Mazda 2 when it's priced the same as a higher end car like the Mazda 3. It's a sales failure and I wouldn't be surprised if it was discontinued.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Mint on 5/3/2013 5:11:57 PM , Rating: 2
Price will come down, as evidenced by this article.

Plug-in hybrids are basically hybrids with a larger battery and a charger. The C-Max Energy is only a few grand more than the equivalently equipped C-Max SEL Hybrid. You can make up the cost difference in a few years.

However, it clear that in these early stages some manufacturers want higher margins on plugins, e.g. the Fusion Energi. It has the same powertrain as the C-Max, but the price premium for the plugin is way higher.

This'll go away with more competition, once again highlighting the importance of getting the ball rolling.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 1:54:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Don't bust his bubble. It takes a lot of effort to only present the facts that support your argument.


I was clear in the context of my post. The other poster had to go out of their way to pick it apart. They made huge leaps in logic to do so, including completely disregarding key words in my post. It was really just poor reading comprehension and reasoning ability.

quote:
It does cost more, and would take a long while to earn the cost difference back,


Which is a huge problem when your main selling point is its efficiency.

quote:
but a 25mpg Mercedes also costs more than a 25mpg Honda. Guess which one most people would pick if they had the choice.


I would pick the Honda. Until automakers start giving away cars for free, price is going to be a huge factor in a purchase. You get a lot for your money with a Honda. The build quality is excellent, they're comfortable, they're reliable, and they're priced right.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 1:35:27 PM , Rating: 1
How poor is your reading comprehension? Do I have to circle key words in crayon?

Here's what I said:

quote:
and gets 37 MPG on average using its hybrid powertrain


Now let's head over to fueleconomy.gov and look at the official rating for its hybrid powertrain:

http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&...

You'll see that when running on gas using its hybrid powertrain it gets 37 Combined (35 City, 40 Highway)

Reading is fundamental, kid.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BRB29 on 5/3/2013 1:18:33 PM , Rating: 4
Your comparison is whacked. The Prius was funded by both Canada and Japan. The Prius had also been on market for a long time so it is in its profitable stage.

The volt weighs ~3.7k lbs
The Prius weighs ~3k lbs

The volt drives much better
The Prius drives like a boat

The volt can charge and go up to 40 miles in full EV
The Prius can't even get 5 miles

The Volt cost more
The Prius cost less

The volt has just recently been debuted and sold
The Prius has been sold since 97

The Volt has tax credit
The Prius also had tax credit

Conclusion: The volt is a better car but it cost more. It is a compromised evolution to become a full EV.

GM is approaching a practical EV starting from a hybrid. Tesla is approaching a practical EV starting from a luxury high tech EV.

We will get an EV either from Tesla or GM that can get 200 mile range in less than a decade that cost less than 40k. Eventually, we will get full EV with 300 mile range for 30k but don't expect it this decade.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By 91TTZ on 5/3/2013 1:45:33 PM , Rating: 1
As I clearly said in my initial post the Volt is probably a nicer car but it comes at a really steep price.

The problem is that they're selling the Volt at a premium price but they're marketing it as a "practical" car. You market fuel efficient econoboxes as "practical" cars. When you're trying to sell a $40k car you better have a better selling point than "it gets good fuel economy".

As a product goes, it's in "no-man's land". It's too expensive for the "practical" market they're targeting, but too bland for the luxury range in which it's priced.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BillyBatson on 5/3/2013 11:52:56 AM , Rating: 2
So the volt is better than the Prius just because it has more available torque? Yes the Prius is underpowered but this one positive the Volt has over the Prius doesn't make the volt a better car.
I will not be considered a hybrid for another 10+ years because the technology, actual fuel savings, and cost just aren't there yet I'm saving more $ driving a 4 banger. That and both these cars are ugly as all hell!


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Spuke on 5/3/2013 1:03:05 PM , Rating: 2
Better driveability does make for a better overall driving experience IMO. My Solstice ultimately is quicker, better handling, and has better brakes than my wife's Bimmer but her cars a much better driver than mine. Steering is better, brake FEEL is nicer, and steering is quicker/sharper. All that says better car to me.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BillyBatson on 5/3/2013 2:28:20 PM , Rating: 2
it really depends on what you consider to be "better" for some people the way a car drives has nothing to do with what makes a better car some people prefer interior comfort to anything to do with the engine etc. "All that says better car to me." yes all that would make for a better car but we weren't talking about all that we were talking about just torque, for me if a car only had better toque over another I wouldn't say that it's the better car.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BillyBatson on 5/3/2013 11:39:23 AM , Rating: 2
+11!


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BRB29 on 5/3/2013 12:47:35 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Toyota and Honda are selling hybrid cars that are about $20,000 without the tax credit. You really think GM is competing with that?


Those hybrids also received tax credits the first few years they sold(up to $3400). They were also initially not profitable. The japanese have their government to help fund their research for the hybrid system and battery technology. The government did not help them build the Prius, just the technology behind it.
Toyota also received funding from Canada to build the Prius.

http://news.ca.msn.com/canada/toyota-gets-governme...

http://www.topspeed.com/cars/car-news/did-the-japa...


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Reclaimer77 on 5/5/2013 7:30:35 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Toyota and Honda are selling hybrid cars that are about $20,000 without the tax credit. You really think GM is competing with that?


They ARE competing actually, just not with the Volt. The Cruze Eco is everything the Volt isn't. It's profitable, it's selling in huge numbers, it's what people want. It's very competitive with the Prius and other hybrids.

It's almost like Volt supporters don't even know the vehicle exists. That or they just can't bring themselves to acknowledge it's the only real "game changer" GM has brought to the table.

I really wish I knew what it was like to be so out of touch with reality. For something as widely hyped and marketed as the Volt, it's been a complete sales disaster. Seriously, why can't you guys admit it? And nearly a third of Volt sales have gone to Crony company #1 General Electric (supplier of charging stations) and other Federal Agencies and State Governments.

In other words, the public at large is roundly rejecting the Volt and the entire concept of this type of vehicle. And you can insult me and hate me all you want, but those are the facts!!! Stop the rhetoric, and deal in facts.

Sales of the Volt this year are down 35% from where they were last year. And yet all we hear from GM and the media is what an amazing product it is. Wake up! It's not just GM that's losing money on this, it's America as well because our tax dollars are still owed. The business strategy seems to be politically-driven, since there is no economic reason to pursue a technology that has been a proven failure in the free market, despite taxpayer subsidization.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Mint on 5/7/2013 9:42:50 AM , Rating: 2
Why do you think a $20k Cruze Eco competes with a $32k Volt? They have completely different standard equipment and ride quality. Yes, the Eco is a competitor to the Prius, but it only matches up to the Volt if you add a bunch of equipment, and even then you won't get the silent ride or instant torque of the Volt.

Volt sales are down 35%? First four months of 2013 are better than first four of 2012. Sure, GM would like it to do better, but it's a long term investment. They can't get $10k cost reductions in the next gen without going through the first gen.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Richard875yh5 on 5/5/2013 7:53:55 AM , Rating: 2
GM is not trying to play catch-up, but the other auto companies are. You don't seem to know what's really going on.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By tayb on 5/3/2013 10:46:18 AM , Rating: 5
The Volt concept car was debuted in January 2007. Development on the Volt began in 2006. The idea that President Obama forced GM to develop a car 3 full years before he was elected President is amusing. The first GM bailout? President Bush presiding.

Many companies sell products at a loss to gain entrance into a market and then recoup the costs later due to decreases in manufacturing costs or add-on sales.

The Volt is cost prohibitive for most buyers but a $10,000 reduction in price would change the scenario for many people. If The Volt II sells well and is profitable who the hell are you to tell GM they shouldn't have taken a risk developing the initial product? The Volt III may be even cheaper and sell even better and none of it would have been possible without the initial risk and investment.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By lelias2k on 5/3/2013 11:23:30 AM , Rating: 2
I couldn't have said it better. Thank you.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By KCjoker on 5/3/13, Rating: 0
RE: Bailout Mentality
By 1prophet on 5/3/2013 8:23:55 PM , Rating: 3
And if Gm didn't kill the EV1 we probably be on Volt generation 3 or 4 by now,

but that takes long term vision which doesn't sit well with executives that believe in immediate profits, the root cause of GM's problems.

Former CEO Rick Wagoner admitted killing the EV1 was the biggest mistake during his tenure as CEO of GM.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Lord 666 on 5/4/2013 9:14:44 AM , Rating: 2
Crushing them was the biggest mistake.

One can always put a pilot project on hold and revamp it later.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By Arsynic on 5/3/2013 10:49:30 AM , Rating: 2
Didn't you hear, Obama saved them himself, not the American tax payer.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BSMonitor on 5/3/13, Rating: -1
RE: Bailout Mentality
By Skywalker123 on 5/4/2013 11:14:43 AM , Rating: 1
Obama supporters still exist? ROFLMAO!


RE: Bailout Mentality
By BSMonitor on 5/3/2013 11:28:32 AM , Rating: 2
Turn off the Glen Beck videos and get your hand off your peepee.

Surely the government had NOTHING to do with the development of gasoline engine infrastructure... Surely they did not... Oh right, history started when you got your first internet porn machine... Oh, sorry, PC.


RE: Bailout Mentality
By MadMan007 on 5/3/2013 10:30:05 PM , Rating: 4
You should take your own advice:

quote:
Reclaimer77 said:
Actually growing up is about knowing that everyone doesn't always want to hear your opinion. And that you don't ALWAYS have to share yours.


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