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BenQ's BW1000 Trio recorder
Another PC Blu-ray devices gets a price tag

After months of waiting, it's finally here: the BenQ BW1000 Trio PC Blu-ray recorder. BenQ announced the player just one month ago, claiming it would become one of the more prolific recorders on the market

The single-layer recorder can record BD-R media at speeds up to 2X, but can read dual-layer Blu-ray media as well. The drive features a single-lens optical pickup with three separate lasers that will read and record Blu-Ray, DVD+/-R and CDRs.  BenQ claims the device will also write single-layer DVD+/-R media at 12X, 4X for DVD+/-R DL, 8X for DVD+/-RW, and 32X CAV for CD-R.

Like other Blu-ray PC recorders, the BW1000 has an estimated MSRP of $1,000 USD, but will not hit store shelves until August 2006.  Earlier this year Lite-On announced the company would take over the majority of BenQ manufacturing. To no surprise, the Lite-On LH-2B1S announced last month and the BW1000 are very similar.



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By sevendust62 on 7/4/2006 1:24:11 PM , Rating: 2
You are exactly correct that this high price is normal.

The first CD-R recording system, introduced in 1988, cost $50,000, was the size of a washing machine, burnt at 1x speed, and blanks costs $100 each.

Then, in 1991, Phillips introduced its 2x recorder, the size of a stereo, for $12,000.

In 1993, JVC introduced the first 5 1/4" drive, 2x speed. In 1995, Yamaha introduced its 4x drive for $5000.

HP released a 2x drive for under $1000, which, according to Upgrading and Repairing PCs by Scott Mueller, was the breakthrough needed, after which a surge of popularity caused prices to rapidly plummet.

So the first drive was $50,000. You can't try to say that this BluRay drive is too expensive for the market. Someone will pay for it.


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