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Print 31 comment(s) - last by marvdmartian.. on Apr 29 at 7:55 AM

Overall phonemaker's profit has plunged, though, amid weakening TV market

LG Electronics, Inc. (KSC:066570) said during its Q1 2013 earnings release that it is preparing a flexible-screen smartphone for launch in Q4 of this year.  The OLED smartphone could be the first flexible smartphone to hit the market, after years of product demoes.

Analysts are concerned that low yields could make for a rocky release for the South Korean Android smartphone maker.

LG is also planning to in May launch in the U.S. a "safer" entry -- an upgrade to the Optimus G Android smartphone, dubbed the Optimus G Pro.  The phone packs a 1080p 5.5-inch screen, a quad-core Snapdragon 600 SoC from Qualcomm, Inc. (QCOM), and Android Jellybean.  That places it in competition with domestic arch-rival Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd.'s (KSC:005930) Galaxy S IV, which launches May 1 on U.S. carriers, and the HTC One from Taiwan's HTC Corp. (TPE:2498).

The Optimus G Pro is already on sale in Japan and South Korea.

OLED flexible
LG is racing to deploy a smartphone with a flexible OLED display. [Image Source: Shiny Plastic]

Overall LG's smartphone unit is performing well, improving its operating margin from 1.4 percent to 4.1 percent.  The unit moved 10.3m smartphones globally in Q1 and hopes to sell at least 45m smartphones this year.

But the company has been hard-hit by declines in its TV business unit.  While its overall revenue rose from 13.2T Won ($11.9B USD) last year to 14.1T Won ($12.7B USD) this year, its profit plunged from 247.5B Won ($223M USD) to 22B Won ($19.8M USD).  This contrasts with Samsung, which posted a record profit.  Samsung and LG are currently embroiled in a contentious court dispute over false advertising.

In related news LG purchased webOS from Hewlett-Packard Corp. (HPQ) in late February.  Thus far it's a bit unclear how that purchase will fit in with LG's smart-TV and smartphone offerings.

Source: WSJ



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RE: Interesting
By Amiga500 on 4/25/2013 5:26:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
i.e. looks at our cool flexible display that otherwise adds no advantage to traditional displays other that being flexible.


Wow - how closed is your mind to the possibilities? :-/

Take a big widescreen monitor... that becomes harder to view at the edges due to angling away from your eyeline. Either get software to orient to the user towards the monitor edges (nigh on impossible given all the settings that would be needed), or curve the monitor. Thats easy now with a flexi display.

No more paper newspapers - just flexible displays and subscriptions instead. Newspapers can now get information out to their readers instantly - no matter if they are in work, on a bus, in a subway. Wherever there is wifi, they have up-to-the minute news.

Your a platoon in the field - you want to get up to date tactical info from your company HQ. They transmit all current data to a UAV in the sky, which relays it to your position. You pull out your "map" from your hip pocket, hit refresh and its all there. You could even get live aerial photography from the UAV on a big display and plan your approach.

Electronic billboards - traditional screens couldn't be used in many locations due to the need to have a firm fixture on the back. Flexi displays could be mounted across a road using wires and cabling from adjacent buildings. OK, in high wind it may be a little harder to read - but most of the time...

Car windshields - want a HUD in the car that can integrate with an infra-red camera to provide imagery of the road ahead at night. No problem with a transparent flexi screen. What about sat nav nearer the driver's eyeline? Or vehicle information without having to take your eyes off the road?

Bound to be loads of others I'm just not thinking of in the 2 mins it took me to write this.


RE: Interesting
By Solandri on 4/25/2013 7:15:15 PM , Rating: 2
I won't go into details, but these are going to be key to developing 3D holographic displays.

Arcing the display gives it a more consistent field of view across wider viewing angles (which is pretty much the whole point of having a 3D display). With a flat display, the further your viewpoint moves from perpendicular, the narrower the FOV becomes (at 90 degrees the angular FOV becomes zero).

Yes you could construct it using a glass display instead of plastic. But molding and grinding glass into arcs, and etching/layering materials onto the curved surface is expensive and a PITA. Portability and durability sucks too. Manufacturing, transport, and durability become much easier and better if you make a flat plastic display, and simply bend it into a circle or arc.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














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