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Spark EV can go 82 miles on full charge

Back in November of last year, Chevrolet started talking up its new Spark electric vehicle. One of the more interesting things that Chevrolet offered up about the small electric vehicle was that it would have impressive performance, being able to reach 60 mph in under 8 seconds.
 
Chevrolet also announced the retail pricing for the vehicle at $32,495 before the $7500 federal tax credit. After that tax credit is applied, the new Spark EV would sell for under $25,000.
 
Chevrolet has offered up some additional information about the Spark this week. The EPA estimated electric driving range for the Spark is 82 miles on full charge. The EPA gives the vehicle a combined city/highway fuel economy equivalent of 119MPGe.

Chevrolet says that the Sparky EV could save owners as much as $9,000 in fuel costs over five years.

“Being able to provide our customers with the best overall efficiency of any retail EV has always been a key target for the Spark EV engineering team,” said Pam Fletcher, GM executive chief engineer for electrified vehicles. “We’re poised to deliver to the market an EV that’s not just efficient, but also thrilling to drive thanks to the 400 lb-ft torque output of its electric motor.”

The Spark uses a 21 kWh lithium-ion battery pack that carries an eight-year or 100,000 mile warranty. The Spark will also be the first vehicle to have an option for the SAE combo charger for DC Fast Charging. This charging capability will be available shortly after launch and will allow the Spark EV to recharge to up to 80% of its total capacity in only 20 min. Chevrolet says the vehicle could handle multiple DC Fast Charges each day. Standard charging takes under seven hours using a dedicated 240 V charger. The vehicle comes standard with a 120 V charge cord.
 
The vehicle is set to go on sale this summer in California and Oregon before a broader rollout at a later date.

Source: GM



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By BRB29 on 4/26/2013 12:39:51 PM , Rating: 3
How many times do i have to say this. EVs have their batteries underneath the seat/floorboard. That's a few hundred pounds of batteries. It has to go there.

Given that the clearance has to be the same as any other passenger cars, do you see why it has to be a few inches taller?
The headroom clearance and seat has to remain the same also.

Same cabin height + same ground clearance + added battery space = slightly taller vehicle. It looks like it's only taller by a few inches so what's the big deal?

It is not a marketing trick, it is by design constraints.

When you make full size cars, you give it more leg rooms and trunk space so it is. The extra size is mostly horizontal rather than vertical. The BMW 3 series is virtually the same height as the BMW 7 series. The main difference being interior space extended horizontally.

Comparing height when it's within a few inches of each other is irrelevant when the length of the cars you listed have a significant delta.


By 91TTZ on 4/26/2013 3:11:33 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
How many times do i have to say this. EVs have their batteries underneath the seat/floorboard. That's a few hundred pounds of batteries. It has to go there.


You keep saying it because you have really poor reading comprehension. I've already pointed out the flaws in your reasoning but you can't see it. So now I have to be more blunt and direct, which comes off as rude.

1. This car is a continuation of a line of cars that have always been pretty tall. They've been tall long before an electric version was even offered.

2. This car's current model didn't offer an electric version until 2013. It's been gas or diesel up until now, yet the car was still the same height. The height did not change in the electric version.

3. GM obviously knows how to make a lower profile electric car because their EV1 was only 51 inches tall (a full 10 inches shorter than this beast)

Since I've established that 1) this line of cars has always been tall and 2) the current model was tall before an electric version was offered and 3) other GM electric cars were shorter, I can confidently say that you're wrong about the tall height being due to it being electric.


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