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Spark EV can go 82 miles on full charge

Back in November of last year, Chevrolet started talking up its new Spark electric vehicle. One of the more interesting things that Chevrolet offered up about the small electric vehicle was that it would have impressive performance, being able to reach 60 mph in under 8 seconds.
 
Chevrolet also announced the retail pricing for the vehicle at $32,495 before the $7500 federal tax credit. After that tax credit is applied, the new Spark EV would sell for under $25,000.
 
Chevrolet has offered up some additional information about the Spark this week. The EPA estimated electric driving range for the Spark is 82 miles on full charge. The EPA gives the vehicle a combined city/highway fuel economy equivalent of 119MPGe.

Chevrolet says that the Sparky EV could save owners as much as $9,000 in fuel costs over five years.

“Being able to provide our customers with the best overall efficiency of any retail EV has always been a key target for the Spark EV engineering team,” said Pam Fletcher, GM executive chief engineer for electrified vehicles. “We’re poised to deliver to the market an EV that’s not just efficient, but also thrilling to drive thanks to the 400 lb-ft torque output of its electric motor.”

The Spark uses a 21 kWh lithium-ion battery pack that carries an eight-year or 100,000 mile warranty. The Spark will also be the first vehicle to have an option for the SAE combo charger for DC Fast Charging. This charging capability will be available shortly after launch and will allow the Spark EV to recharge to up to 80% of its total capacity in only 20 min. Chevrolet says the vehicle could handle multiple DC Fast Charges each day. Standard charging takes under seven hours using a dedicated 240 V charger. The vehicle comes standard with a 120 V charge cord.
 
The vehicle is set to go on sale this summer in California and Oregon before a broader rollout at a later date.

Source: GM



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By BRB29 on 4/25/2013 3:32:06 PM , Rating: 2
I never said lowering drag will increase unstability. Making a car look good and stable requires wind tunnel to shape the body for down force and also how it flows on the sides and underneath. Normally, it adds a bit more drag for obvious reasons. These little cars are meant for efficiency so they just go for the lowest drag while meeting safety regs. If you don't believe me then drive one of these things at 80 mph. I have, it's scary as $%#@ and every gust of wind feels like it's going to blow you away.

And what is your point with these dimentions? It says that the Spark is a smaller car.

What those dimensions doesn't tell you is that the solstice actually have much more overhangs past the wheel base. A solstice is a much longer car overall, not just the wheel base.

Next time, at least try to be more convincing.


By Solandri on 4/25/2013 5:40:26 PM , Rating: 2
It's worth pointing out that lower drag coefficient doesn't automatically mean lower drag. To calculate actual drag, you multiply the drag coefficient by the surface area of the profile the car presents to the wind, times a few constants.

So if it's taller, that's going to increase the profile's surface area and increase the drag. Maybe even enough so there's higher drag despite the Cd being lower. (Likewise, a narrower body will reduce drag.)


By Spuke on 4/25/2013 6:58:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's worth pointing out that lower drag coefficient doesn't automatically mean lower drag. To calculate actual drag, you multiply the drag coefficient by the surface area of the profile the car presents to the wind, times a few constants.
X2 yep


By Spuke on 4/25/2013 5:42:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I never said lowering drag will increase unstability.
Don't you read what you write? You said making a short wheelbase car, wider would make it unstable. It does not. I referenced my own car as an example of a car that's wide and has a short wheelbase. Those two combinations happen quite a bit on sports cars which are very stable compared to typical cars. Your statement was overgeneralized.


By BRB29 on 4/26/2013 8:08:18 AM , Rating: 2
I don't think you know what you wrote so I'll quote it for you.

quote:
Yes they can and have and lower CG does NOT make a car more unstable. It does the opposite. These cars are tall to give the impression of roominess, that's all. Wheelbase comparison Chevy Spark: 93.1 inches Pontiac Solstice: 95.1 inches Track comparison Chevy Spark: 55.5/55.7 inches Pontiac Solstice: 60.1/60.7 inches Overall width comparison Chevy Spark: 62.9 inches Pontiac Solstice: 71.3 inches


When tuning in a wind tunnel. You can go for stability or efficiency or most likely a combination of both. The priority for this car is efficiency because that's the whole point of the car. If you don't tune for stability then any big gust of wind will make the vehicle unstable at high speed.

Yes wheel base does matter for stability at high speed. Have you ever try driving a car that has a nearly squared wheel base? You will spin out very quickly. The only good thing is that you will have a very small turning radius.

And again all passenger cars meant for daily driving have pretty much the same ground clearance. The interior also need to have a certain amount of space for headroom clearance. The overall dimensions are smaller. So yes, a shorter car overall will look taller because they are shorter.
And please don't start listing sports cars and supercars will low ground clearance. It is clearly not meant for buying groceries and driving through pothole littered roads.


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