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Spark EV can go 82 miles on full charge

Back in November of last year, Chevrolet started talking up its new Spark electric vehicle. One of the more interesting things that Chevrolet offered up about the small electric vehicle was that it would have impressive performance, being able to reach 60 mph in under 8 seconds.
 
Chevrolet also announced the retail pricing for the vehicle at $32,495 before the $7500 federal tax credit. After that tax credit is applied, the new Spark EV would sell for under $25,000.
 
Chevrolet has offered up some additional information about the Spark this week. The EPA estimated electric driving range for the Spark is 82 miles on full charge. The EPA gives the vehicle a combined city/highway fuel economy equivalent of 119MPGe.

Chevrolet says that the Sparky EV could save owners as much as $9,000 in fuel costs over five years.

“Being able to provide our customers with the best overall efficiency of any retail EV has always been a key target for the Spark EV engineering team,” said Pam Fletcher, GM executive chief engineer for electrified vehicles. “We’re poised to deliver to the market an EV that’s not just efficient, but also thrilling to drive thanks to the 400 lb-ft torque output of its electric motor.”

The Spark uses a 21 kWh lithium-ion battery pack that carries an eight-year or 100,000 mile warranty. The Spark will also be the first vehicle to have an option for the SAE combo charger for DC Fast Charging. This charging capability will be available shortly after launch and will allow the Spark EV to recharge to up to 80% of its total capacity in only 20 min. Chevrolet says the vehicle could handle multiple DC Fast Charges each day. Standard charging takes under seven hours using a dedicated 240 V charger. The vehicle comes standard with a 120 V charge cord.
 
The vehicle is set to go on sale this summer in California and Oregon before a broader rollout at a later date.

Source: GM



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RE: $9000 over 5 years????
By ERROR666 on 4/25/2013 11:39:49 AM , Rating: 2
Do you really think you can get 84 miles out of it in city traffic? Good luck to you. 84 miles are easy going miles on a straight road with minimal wind, at 45-50 mph with no ac, closed windows, etc...
Now, if you sit in trafic for 3 hrs it really doesn't matter how many miles you're doing.. You're still using ac, radio, motor, breaks and steering.


RE: $9000 over 5 years????
By BRB29 on 4/25/2013 11:55:32 AM , Rating: 1
EVs are most efficient in city traffic. Like I've said, there's no city folks that drive more than 50 miles a day unless they're taxi drivers. You can sit for a very long time in an EV before it needs recharging. You might want to do some research first before talking silly.


RE: $9000 over 5 years????
By FITCamaro on 4/25/2013 12:05:09 PM , Rating: 2
You're still using more energy in stop and go as opposed to cruising. Speeding up takes more energy than maintaining speed. Plus when you're not moving, the car is still using power for the radio, AC, and other electronics.


RE: $9000 over 5 years????
By BRB29 on 4/26/2013 9:11:35 AM , Rating: 2

Yes it does but low speed is much more efficient than high speed also. Drag/air resistance is also not a problem at low speed. Most of your energy goes into propelling the actual vehicle instead of pushing the air. EVs also only have 1 gear. For the motor to spin faster, the energy requirements is not linear to motor speed. As the motor spin faster, it actually becomes less efficient.
You don't ever wonder why hybrids gets better city mpg than highway?

Radios and other electronics actually eats up very little energy. AC is actually not as much of a problem as heating.

In EVs, the AC doesn't have to work as hard. There is no engine that heats up the car and there is no piping underneath that also transfer some of that heat into the cabin. The AC itself is in an engine bay that is not hot.

Heating is and has been a problem. In cold environments, you lose some battery capacity already and then you have to use more energy to heat up everything. It takes a lot more energy to heat a cabin from 30F to 70F vs cooling from 95F to 75F.


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