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  (Source: allthingsd.com)
It even won backing from U.S. President Barack Obama

Legislation for the collection of online sales taxes took a major step forward in a Senate vote Monday evening. 

The legislation -- known as the Marketplace Fairness Act -- scored a big victory in a procedural vote of 74-20 Monday night. It even won backing from U.S. President Barack Obama. 

The Marketplace Fairness Act allows states to force out-of-state retailers to collect online sales taxes. Currently, states can only require merchants within their borders to collect sales taxes.

The legislation offers an exemption for merchants that generate less than $1 million in annual out-of-state revenue.

"It will level the playing field for local small business retailers who are undercut every day by out-of-state on-line companies," said Jay Carney, White House spokesman. 

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid filed a motion in support of the new bill last Thursday. 

Many states are in favor of the Marketplace Fairness Act because the money from sales tax collection could help with financial deficits. For instance, the California Board of Equalization said it made $96.4 million in sales tax on internet commerce from September-December 2012, which is the first full quarter that the state started collecting.

Brick-and-mortar stores are also happy with the legislation, since stores like Wal-Mart and Best Buy have complained about the unfair advantage online retailers like Amazon have when it comes to the lack of sales tax collection in certain states. 

However, not everyone is in favor of the Marketplace Fairness Act. Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) strongly opposes the legislation, and plans to fight it until the end. 

"This is big retailers and big business lining up to put burdens on the Internet for small online business," said Ayotte. "It is so wrong and it is a precursor to other things they will try to grab using the Internet, including taxing the Internet."

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has said that he would comply with sales tax collection if there were some sort of federal legislation regarding the topic. It has been fighting U.S. states that force it to collect sales tax for years (except in Kansas, Kentucky, New York, North Dakota and Washington). Only recently has it started collecting in additional states (like Texas and New Jersey, for example). But in return, Amazon gets to create more distribution centers within these state's borders. 

Source: The New York Times



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Le sigh
By brshoemak on 4/23/2013 4:43:15 PM , Rating: 2
Just a note for those bickering about Democrats/Republicans/Obama/BigBadGov't/etc.:

YOU HAVE ALWAYS BEEN REQUIRED TO PAY APPROPRIATE TAXES ON INTERNET PURCHASES!

You're supposed to go through all your receipts when tax time rolls around, calculate and then pay the appropriate sales tax for your online purchases. However, I can count on zero fingers how many people actually did that. Why should they when it was such a major PITA?

Even if the recession didn't happen, even if Romney was in the White House, even if we were all rich, even if there were budget surpluses - this would still have happened eventually. Therefore, this soap-boxing is not necessary or warranted.

Do I want to pay taxes on internet purchases? Hellz No! I live off Amazon Prime BUT I also knew that this free ride would end eventually. It's pointless to shout about whoever you wish to blame, these wheels were set in motion long ago.




RE: Le sigh
By Jim Vanus on 4/24/2013 12:59:44 PM , Rating: 2
True. Sad, but true.


"We are going to continue to work with them to make sure they understand the reality of the Internet.  A lot of these people don't have Ph.Ds, and they don't have a degree in computer science." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis














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