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Print 23 comment(s) - last by Samus.. on Apr 16 at 1:04 PM

Incredibly fast service costs only $51 per month

Sony has announced the world's fastest home internet service. If you're in the United States, don't get excited. This internet service is exclusively available in Japan and offers download speeds of 2 Gbps (uploads are capped at 1 Gbps). The internet service is provided by So-net Entertainment and is called Nuro.

The fiber-optic service was available for qualifying homes as of today including houses, apartments, and small businesses in Tokyo and six surrounding communities.

Incredibly, So-net Entertainment is offering the service for ¥4980, which works out to only $51 per month. There is a rather large installation fee of ¥52,500 ($543), however, those who apply for the service online right now can waive that installation fee.

The web connectivity price includes the rental of an Optical Network Unit (ONU) designed handle the high-speed connectivity and converts signals from the fiber to broadband internet usable in the home. Considering that 2 Gbps is faster than most home routers and adapters support, odds are the hardware within the user's house will be the limiting factor on speeds.

The Japanese government continues to back fiber-optic connections to private residences in Japan. Roughly 25% of all homes in Japan are currently connected to fiber internet services giving Japan the second highest rate of connectivity to fiber in the world. The most connected fiber country in the world is the UAE with over 70%.
 
For comparisons sake, Google Fiber costs $70/month and offers 1 Gbps speeds (up/down).

Source: PC World



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RE: How much bandwidth do you need?
By Totally on 4/15/2013 9:28:47 PM , Rating: 2
So what, you're paying $70 give or take, for that 20Mbps connection. which to them is a few cents. The 2Gbps is most likely their top tier offering and it looks like they could scale it down to something like 400Mps for $10.


By zogmeister on 4/15/2013 9:44:11 PM , Rating: 2
In Tokyo, I share a 200Mbps fiber connection with 90 other households in a high-rise condo for $15/mo, which is better than it sounds--it's cheap, and I rarely find myself fighting over bandwidth. Nevertheless, perhaps we should switch to So-net and share a 2Gbps line instead. :-)

In absence of this kind of arrangement, though, it'd be uneconomical to offer reduced speed for reduced price, as much of that $50/mo is probably being spent on fiber/cable/router depreciation and maintenance (i.e., fixed cost per line) rather than packet forwarding (variable cost).


RE: How much bandwidth do you need?
By Spookster on 4/15/2013 11:50:39 PM , Rating: 2
Uh no I only pay $45 for my 20Mbps service.


RE: How much bandwidth do you need?
By Samus on 4/15/2013 11:59:11 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly, and you could be paying just $6/month more and have the ability to not just stream 1080p Bluray (36mbps) and even 4K (68mbps)

The other factor is latency. The fiber network and its equipment presumably offers single-digit pings to all of Japan.


By Milliamp on 4/16/2013 3:57:52 AM , Rating: 2
There is any inherit reason the latency would be lower on a 2G fiber link vs a 100M fiber link assuming neither of them are congested.


RE: How much bandwidth do you need?
By Shadowself on 4/16/2013 8:56:54 AM , Rating: 2
The Blu-ray standard is 40 Mbps, max, for the video only. There is an additional 8 Mbps, max, for the audio. Thus the maximum total data rate for Blu-ray is 48 Mbps. True, few movies routinely hit these peaks, and extremely few average, over the entire length of the movie, more than 30 Mbps for both video and audio. However, if you're going to try to quote the Blu-ray standard you should know the real data rates. (And just for completeness, the raw, data usage maximum for Blu-ray is 72 Mbps. This is not for use in your Blu-ray video player, but as a data disk.)

Also the evolving standard for a Blu-ray equivalent data rate for UHDTV (2160x3840) ( NOT 4K [2160x4096] which is a Digital Cinema Standard!) will likely include the H.265 standard to get the total video rate down. No one really knows where the standard will end up. However, forcing both video and audio into a 68 Mbps aggregate stream will cause video or audio (or both) to suffer significantly. Still, it is likely to be more on the order of 100 Mbps for both video and audio than the 68 Mbps you mention. UHDTV is four times the video information (even if they don't extend the color range, which is being discussed, which would increase the information rate further) and with the higher efficiency of H.265 it is likely the video rate can be capped at < 92 Mbps, which, when added to the same 8 Mbps audio rate comes to about 100 Mbps.


By Shadowself on 4/16/2013 9:04:00 AM , Rating: 2
Correction:
I did a bit of checking. Seems my data is based upon the data streams themselves and not the marketed disks. I was involved in it way back when and it appears the commercially sold disks got lobotomized a bit from the original specs of the format.

The Max data rate of the standard "1x" commercially available movie disk is 36 Mbps, aggregate.

I really need to keep up on these standards and realize when they've been needlessly limited!


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