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It also wants to redirect large asteroids that may harm Earth

NASA is planning to capture both large and small asteroids for the purpose of studying them -- and also redirecting them if they happen to threaten mankind.

NASA's fiscal year 2014 budget proposal talks about catching near-Earth asteroids robotically and sending them to orbit in the Earth-moon system. That way, astronauts can safely travel to the asteroids and explore them.

According to this initiative, it will use both current and developing technology to move large, hazardous asteroids away from Earth and capture the smaller ones for exploration. Some of the current technology that will be used includes the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft.


NASA is preparing for an asteroid landing in other ways too, such as simulating the environment for astronauts. For instance, the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) launched 15 simulated asteroid missions in 2011 and 16 in 2012. These missions simulated various challenges astronauts would face when visiting an asteroid, such as how to collect samples, anchor to it and move around the surface.

Last week, The Space Studies Board and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board held a joint meeting in Washington to discuss the future goals of human space exploration. The parties seemed torn between continuing on with an asteroid landing or planning another trip to the moon.

Al Carnesale of UCLA said there wasn't much enthusiasm for an asteroid landing since its initial announcement three years ago, but NASA Administrator Charles Bolden disagreed. 

“NASA will not take the lead on a human lunar mission. NASA is not going to the Moon with a human as a primary project probably in my lifetime," said Bolden. "And the reason is, we can only do so many things.”

Bolden believes NASA should stick to the plan of sending humans to an asteroid by 2025 and Mars by 2030. 

Source: Science Daily



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By TimberJon on 4/15/2013 11:53:02 AM , Rating: 2
I'm trying to think of how Mars or even the moon would get enough oxygen and water for an extended period, without frequent cargo trips. The payload would have to be big, the crew/staff smaller. Could hydroponics be shipped there as well on the initial phase? Would it be effective enough?

I like to keep thinking that we shouldn't poke out at the stars until we have a much larger ship. Not shuttle size. Larger. Look at www.iter.org. Nearly unlimited power + big ship = more payload + more trips + farther range.

This one book "The moon is a harsh mistress" basically had tunnels dug out under the moon to make habitats because they were already sealed air-tight.




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