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Hon Hai reported a 19 percent sales decline for Q1 2013 compared to Q1 2012

Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. saw an unexpected yearly decline in the first quarter of 2013 thanks to shrinking demand for Apple's iPhone. Hon Hai reported a 19 percent sales decline for Q1 2013 compared to Q1 2012. While analysts were expecting quarterly decline from Q4 2012, they didn't see the yearly decline coming.

Hon Hai posted sales earnings of T$808.87 billion ($26.96 billion USD) for the quarter ended March 2013. This was a drop from T$988.34 billion in Q4 2012 and a further decline from T$1 trillion in Q1 2012. 

Hon Hai, which collects about 60 to 70 percent of its revenue from the iPhone and iPad, saw a decrease in sales due to low demand for the iPhone in particular. 

Apple has hard a hard time keeping up the momentum of its products, and it shows in the company's shares. Shares have fallen from $702.10 in September to $426.98 as of today. Also, Apple's iPhone only represented about 19 percent of worldwide smartphone shipments in 2012 while all Android-powered smartphones accounted for about 70 percent.

Android will even beat Apple in the tablet sector this year, according to a new report from IDC. IPad shipments are expected to make up 46 percent of the tablet market for 2013, down from 51 percent in 2012. Android-powered tablets are expected to increase their market share to 49 percent in 2013, up from 42 percent in 2012.

Samsung is a particularly strong competitor to Apple as far as Android-powered devices go. We even saw a bit of fear in Apple as Phil Schiller (Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing) talked trash about Android on the eve of the Samsung Galaxy S IV release. 

Samsung is even racing Apple to make a wearable device this year -- much like a smart watch -- and has plans to trump Apple's new spaceship campus with a more impressive headquarters in the U.S.

Source: Reuters



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RE: same crap again and again
By TakinYourPoints on 4/10/2013 9:07:36 PM , Rating: 2
I think most of the UI facelift will be simplification and a move away from skeumorphism.

A few of those things have already trickled out with the new lock screen music controls and the new podcast app. We'll see if its more of that across the entire system. Apple is in the same position Microsoft is with desktop operating systems. It is a market dominant UI in the high end that has worked so well for so many people, and there's a risk of alienating existing customers with a massive redesign.

Android got away with major annual redesigns since they were so far behind in polish and stability that it actually needed it. From Froyo to the various iterations of Gingerbread to JB, it had to catch up in polish and stability. Only after Gingerbread could they start to stabilize the UI once the OS started to get up to snuff. Notice the complaints of "not enough OS changes" after JB launched. Things are going to be much less volatile for Android now that Google has passed much of their "polishing" phase.

Microsoft got away with radical change in Windows Phone because they decided to start from scratch. They were in last place anyway, so why not start fresh? It allowed them to open up with something completely revolutionary compared to other mobile OS UIs.

The worst case for an established platform would be something as radical as the move from Windows 7 (basically the same UI for 15 years) to Windows 8. It was a dominant platform that changed things so radically that it alienated much of its userbase. iOS is in a similar potential position right now.

Market domination encourages conservatism, the more users you have the less you want to rattle their cages with huge changes.

Execution obviously matters (its something that the schizophrenic Windows 8 hadn't figured out yet) and good execution trumps short term growing pains, so we'll see what happens if there is a radical iOS 7 update. Maybe they go crazy with it, but I believe it will be mostly cosmetic with the same underlying fundamentals. The grid of icons paradigm isn't going away. We'll see.


RE: same crap again and again
By theapparition on 4/11/2013 10:12:15 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Android got away with major annual redesigns since they were so far behind in polish and stability that it actually needed it.

Completely wrong with this. Google still tends to release updated major Android version on a yearly basis. JB was released last year, and only a minor revision was released since then (and it's still called JB). ICS was released the year before that. Honeycomb the year before that, along with Gingerbread a year before that. So wherever you are getting your info, it's flat out wrong.

quote:
Notice the complaints of "not enough OS changes" after JB launched. Things are going to be much less volatile for Android now that Google has passed much of their "polishing" phase.

Again, what complaints, since JB wasn't even released a year ago. Certainly there were many kudos during the JB release last year, as it brought many advances. Quite possibly your again thinking about the minor JB (4.2) release that changed so little they didn't even bother changing the name.


RE: same crap again and again
By retrospooty on 4/11/2013 11:18:44 AM , Rating: 2
He lives is a very different reality than the rest of us ;)


RE: same crap again and again
By TakinYourPoints on 4/11/2013 6:05:42 PM , Rating: 2
As opposed to the reality you live in where a platform that has slow hardware, sells significantly less, barely registers as a blip in online usage, and has almost no tablet optimized applications has surpassed the one that is objectively superior in every way.

Sure thing dude ;)


RE: same crap again and again
By retrospooty on 4/11/2013 7:20:51 PM , Rating: 2
Context... Learn it, or don't comment.


RE: same crap again and again
By TakinYourPoints on 4/11/2013 5:57:23 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
JB was released last year, and only a minor revision was released since then (and it's still called JB). ICS was released the year before that.


Yes, the point is that major revisions are slowing down since the release of ICS, now that the platform is maturing and catching up in fundamental features (stability, polish, smoothness).

And yes, there were complaints that JB wasn't a big enough improvement over ICS. Again, a mature platform doesn't need the rapid updates that something held together by tape and rubber bands like Gingerbread and before was. Even ICS didn't have everything in terms of smoothness, Android added that feature iOS had way back in 2007 with "project butter", and their big tablets are still laggy and unresponsive.


RE: same crap again and again
By theapparition on 4/15/2013 10:57:57 AM , Rating: 2
You still know absolutely nothing.

quote:
Yes, the point is that major revisions are slowing down since the release of ICS, now that the platform is maturing and catching up in fundamental features (stability, polish, smoothness).

I just proved to you that Google is still on a yearly release cycle. Jellybean (4.1) was released in June 2012 at the Google I/O conference. 4.2 was released in November 2012. Key Lime Pie (5.0) is set to be released in June 2013.
How in the world can you delude yourself to believe that major revisions are slowing?

quote:
And yes, there were complaints that JB wasn't a big enough improvement over ICS.

There's always complaints, but show me a critical review that highlights the negatives. Instead, all reviews have been quite positive towards the improvements in JB from ICS.

quote:
Android added that feature iOS had way back in 2007 with "project butter", and their big tablets are still laggy and unresponsive .

Again, you know nothing but convince yourself you do. There is no "laggyness" with most Android tablets. I'll concede the Asus Transformer Prime had a hardware bug that made it miserable to use in some circumstances, but again, that's a hardware issue where Asus cut corners with a horrible I/O controller and had absolutely nothing to do with Android.

Try using the Nexus 10 and come back to tell me it's laggy.


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