backtop


Print 38 comment(s) - last by danjw1.. on Mar 26 at 2:08 PM

Downsides include up-front costs and sometimes patchy network

T-Mobile USA -- invigorated by a merger with MetroPCS Communications Inc. (PCS), courtesy of the partial acquisition of MetroPCS by parent Deutsche Telekom AG's (ETR:DTE) -- is looking to rock the U.S. cellular market by switching to a mostly subsidy-free "UNcarrier" model.

I. The Rollout

Traditionally smartphones in the U.S. cost anywhere from nothing (free) to a couple hundred dollars.  The true cost of these smartphone devices can be $600 USD or more.  But carriers have transferred that cost to customers over the life of the plan via higher service bills.  

It's long seemed a clever psychological gambit; tricking customers into thinking they're paying less.  But it's not one that everyone is happy with.  Of late opposition to the subsidy model has been mounting.  And T-Mobile USA is leading the critics.

Starting today you'll be able to buy an unsubsidized handset from the carrier or elsewhere and then build a service package buffet-style that works for you.

Unsubsidized plans
T-Mobile rolls out its new unsubsidized pricing scheme today.
[Image Source: T-Mobile USA via TMONews]

Pricing varies based on the amount of data you select (500 MB, 2 GB, 4 GB, 6 GB, 8 GB, 10 GB, 12 GB, and unlimited options are possible).  For the 500 MB option you get that, plus unlimited talk and text for $50 USD/month.  For $20 USD you get "unlimited" data (no overages), while for each $10 USD more, you get 2 GB of unthrottled data.

II. What Do You Gain? What Do You Lose?

So how does this stack up to other carriers? You have to remember; you're not getting your handset subsidized.  

With that in mind let's consider a 1 GB data contract with unlimited talk and text.  On the nation's largest network -- Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ) and Vodafone Group Plc.'s (LON:VOD) joint-subsidiary Verizon Wireless -- you get this for $90 USD/month on a two-year contract.  The same contract is $60 USD/month on T-Mobile.  So you save $720 USD over the course of the two-year contract by picking T-Mobile.

Most premium smartphones on T-Mobile fall in the $400-500 USD range, so even with the cost of the phone, you'll still come out a couple hundred dollars ahead.  Plus T-Mobile USA does offer financing to essentially lessen the blow of paying for your new phone up front.  There's (of course) a small fee (interest) involved, but overall it's not as bad as a subsidized plan.

Also recall that T-Mobile subscribers are now "free" and can leave at any time -- versus subsidized contract customers on other networks who face incremental cancellation fee penalties for jumping ship before the contract's 2 years are up.

HTC One
Buying handsets like the HTC One may be expensive unsubsidized, but T-Mobile's pricing scheme will save you significantly over the course of your contract.

So the upsides are being contract free, saving money, and having a more clear perspective on what you're paying for service versus what you're paying for hardware.

About the only downsides are that you do have to pay up-front, and more importantly that T-Mobile's HSPA+ 3.5G network leaves something to be desired in terms of coverage and speed.  T-Mobile has promised an aggressive LTE rollout this year to catch up with rivals Verizon, Sprint Nextel Corp. (S), and AT&T, Inc. (T), but it's premature to assume it will achieve its ambitious goals for that push.

Regardless, if you want the best contract price-wise T-Mobile is the place to be (or possibly one of Sprint's various pre-paid brands).  With handsets like the HTC One by HTC Corp. (TPE:2498) and the Galaxy S IV by Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd (KSC:005930) incoming, T-Mobile may see a strong pickup if it can properly advertise just how good a deal it's giving U.S. customers.

Source: TMONews



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

By DT_Reader on 3/26/2013 12:51:19 AM , Rating: 2
You forget this has been the Phone Company business model since forever. When AT&T introduced colored phones (they were always black) they charged a premium of around $6/month, which was a LOT in the 1950s. A colored phone was a luxury item. Then, in the late 1960s, anyone could get any color offered for the price of black. But those who already had a colored phone kept paying that $6/month surcharge right up until the government broke up Ma Bell in the 1970s and finally allowed you to own your own phone.

The telephone business has always been, and always will be, a rip-off.


"Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine." -- Bill Gates














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki