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However, cell phones would still be left off the list of usable devices during these times on a flight

As mobile gadgets become increasingly ubiquitous with new versions released at a rapid pace, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is realizing that it may have to ease back on its rules concerning the use of readers/tablets during takeoff and landing. 

By the end of this year, an industry working group set up by the FAA may announce that the use of devices like Kindle e-readers and iPads can be used during takeoffs and landings of a plane. By this time next year, the new, more relaxed rules could already be implemented.

However, cell phones would still be left off the list of usable devices during these times on a flight.

The FAA set up an industry working group last year comprised of employees from Boeing, Amazon, the Consumer Electronics Association, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the Association of Flight Attendants, aircraft companies, etc. The group first met in January to begin studying whether electronic devices really affect a plane's avionics or not.



The study is not only focusing on tablets and e-readers, but also future devices like Google's Glass product (augmented reality glasses) and Apple's upcoming smart watch. 

The group is expected to present its findings by July 31, 2013. 

While the group may announce that certain mobile devices are safe for takeoffs and landings, the gadgets will still have to be set in airplane mode during those times. 

The upcoming report from the industry group hopes to accomplish a system where flight attendants don't have to police passengers as far as what devices can be used and whether they're in airplane mode or not. It also hopes to move from having several regulations to just one set, which covers the proper devices and their use. 

The FAA has set rules that make it so passengers cannot use electronic devices like smartphones, tablets and e-readers during takeoff and landing on a flight. However, there is no solid proof that electronics affect the way a plane performs. This has been in question for some time, but the FAA continues to impose these rules on passengers, and it has caused panic and even injuries among those who travel by plane. For instance, a 68-year-old man punched a 15-year-old on a plane when the teenager refused to turn off his smartphone during a flight. According to the man, he was doing it to save the entire plane from any harmful consequences.

But in early December 2011, the FAA raised a few eyebrows when allowing American Airlines pilots to use iPads in the cockpit. The FAA allowed iPads to replace paper manuals and charts, and they could be used during takeoff and landing.

In December 2012, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) pressured the FAA to allow greater use of electronic devices during takeoff and landing because "they empower people to stay informed and connected with friends and family, and they enable both large and small businesses to be more productive and efficient, helping drive economic growth and boost U.S. competitiveness."

Source: The New York Times



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RE: Common sense.
By Dorkyman on 3/26/2013 12:15:40 PM , Rating: 2
No studies have EVER shown interference. Mythbusters couldn't find a connection either. Avionics have excellent shielding.

I expect that probably 50% of smartphone users don't bother to either turn their phones off or put them in airplane mode. So the cabin is full of fully-operational devices. And still no issues.

No, I have to conclude it's nothing more than a control issue.


"I mean, if you wanna break down someone's door, why don't you start with AT&T, for God sakes? They make your amazing phone unusable as a phone!" -- Jon Stewart on Apple and the iPhone














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